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CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 



u. 



HARDWARE-METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 
Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 5, 1907 



NO. 1. 




BUTCHERS 
HUNTINGS 5. 
POCKET KNIVES 



"QUEEN'S HEAD" 
SHEETS 



BLACK 



GALVANIZED 



The highest grade on the market. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
Managers, Canadian Branch 



For Sale bv Leading; Wholesale Houses. 



It Pays To Recommend 
The "So ve reign 



tt 



The dealers who recommend "The Sovereign" hot water boiler 
all the time make good friends. BECAUSE the advantages of ''The 
Sovereign' are apparent to all. 

"The Sovereign" hot water boilers certainly emphasise the ad- 
vantages of hot water heating system. 

"The Sovereign" can't help saving your customer's money 
because it is built on scientific principles which assure economy. 

There can be no leak about "The Sovereign" because there are 
no internal joints in the water section of the boiler. EsLfc* 

BS^f- 1 y* does pay to recommend "The Sovereign" 



TAYLOR - FORBES COMPANY, Limited 




T0R0NT0-1O88 
MONTREAL 12 
Head Office and 



King St. West. 
Craig St. West. 
Works CUELPH, ONT. 



AGENTS: 

Mechanics' Supply Co., Quebec. 
Vulcan Iron Works Co., Winnipeg. 
Boyd-Burns & Co., Vancouver. 



Sme Cla+mlfiad Umt of Advert imemmnta on Page 67. 



i 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Brass Bedsteads 



B 




V 
P 28. Iron Bedstead 

l 5 16 pillars, head 61 inches, foot 41 

inches high, 3, 3 ' 2 , 4, 4 ' 2 

feet wide. 



E 
D 

S 




P 126. ^.„ss Bedstead 

Swell *"'■""., 2-inch continuous pillars, 
K oottom, tube head 61 V? inches 
high, foot 41 inches, \y t feet wide. 



BEDSTEADS 

E 
A 
D 

S 





P 136. Brass Bedstead 



Bow foot, \ l A inch pillars, head *J3 

inches high, foot 42 inches high, 

3, 3J£, 4 or 4>2 feet wide. 



Willi; FOE PRICKS AND CIR< LARS 



P 139. Brass Bedstead 

How foot, 2-inch pillars, cross tubes 

j + -inch, head 62 inches, foot 41 

inches high, 4>£ feet wide. 



J 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIH1TED 




TORONTO. 



i 

« 






HARDWARE AND METAL 




A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

CHICAOO SPRINQ BUTT 




TRIPLE-END SPRING BUTT 








CHICAOO BALI -BEARINO 
FLOOR HINOE 



CHICAGO NEW YORK 

CATALOQUE ON REQUEST 



OUR LINES 

FOR XMAS 

ARE SELLERS 

BOKER'S SKATES 

Single and Double Endcra. 

Dominion Perfect, Rover, King Fisher, Crescent 

HOCKEY STICKS 
GILLETTE SAFETY RAZORS 

No stropping ; no honing. 

GILLETTE EXTRA BLADES 

BOKER'S KING CUTTER RAZORS 

RODGER S PEN AND POCKET KNIVES 

CARVERS IN CASES 

SCISSORS IN CASES 

QUALITY HIGH PRICES LOW 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

Wholesale Hardware 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



oth Vo Sl \ZZ\ "YANKEE TOOLS' 



> 



SCREW DRIVERS 

"s 



No. 10 * II — RATCHET, right and left hand and rigid 




are 

SETTER 

The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 



of the KIND. 
DRILLS 





No. 40— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with Ratchet Movement. 



No. 30— SPIRAL RATCHET right and left hand and rigid. 
No. 31— " " (heavy pattern) 

No. 10— " " right hand only. 



Chuck and 8 Drill Polnta 

for tplral ratchet 
icrew driver. 




Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 
screw driver. 




No. 12-RATCHET, 

with stab blade 



No. 60 -POCKET 
SCREW DRIVER. 




No. 44— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 





No 50 RECIPROCATING D Rl LL, for wood or meUli 



SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, F>a. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





1 




i 



Pif\lr^C MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pinks Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rock Maple. 

These are light and durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 

MANUFACTURED BY 

arr thomas pink 

Pembroke, Ont, Canada. 



Established 1855 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

PIG IRON 



ENGLISH and 

Prompt and forward delivery. 



SCOTCH 

Interesting prices. 



Warehouse: 54-56-58 Front St. West and 1 Piper St. 

M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

TORONTO 






HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUICK 
SELLERS 



Hurd's Bench Axe. Canada Pattern. 

Extra Full Weight Crucible Cast. 

Steel Bit, Polished and Bronzed. 



No. 

2 
3 

4 



Width cut in. 

4J/ 2 
5 

5y 3 



No. 
5 



Width cut in. 

6 
6% 




HADEFROMREHNEDWSTSTia. jplj 

I iJoHNSONYlLtfAXEMFG.G. jjjf 

JOHNSON VIU.E.NX W-A- p=r; 




Hurd's Broad Axe. Canada Pattern. 

Bronze Finish. 

Extra Quality Cast Steel. 



Wgt. lbs., 



5 to 71/2, 



8 to 8' : 



9 lbs. 



Five Years ago the name 
"Hurd's" was not known in 
Canada. To-day there are 
more Hurd's Axes sold 
than any other make. 

The quality is superior, and 
the next surprising thing is, 
that they are all sold at the 
same price— or lower — than 
the Canadian makes. 

This is a line that is not 
cut. There is money in it 
for you. Get wise. 



OTTAWA 
TORONTO 
VANCOUVER 
CALGARY 



LEWIS BROS., LTD. 



MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL TORONTO 




nUanufacturGrs of 



Iron and Steel Mire, 
Brass Wire, 
Gopper Wire, 

WE MANUFACTURE A FULL LINE OF 




Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws, Steel and Brass Jack Chain 

Staples, 



SINGLE AND DOUBLE LINK 



WHEN MAKING UP YOUR NEXT ORDER 
' FOR 

Bright Wire Goods, Br| ht Wjre Coods or Wood Screws 

Spring Cotters, 6 INCLUDE m ORDER 

Steel Wire Barrel Hoops your requirements for jack chain 

When Ordering PLEASE Specify DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO.'S Goods 



We desire to extend our hearty greetings to 
all our customers and friends and hope they, 
one and all, will enjoy a very Happy and Prosper- 
ous New Year. We would also take this oppor- 
tunity to thank them for their kind consideration 
in the past and assure them that their interests 
in the future will be more closely looked after 
than ever. 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. Ltd., 



MONTREAL and 

WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS &. CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 

138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




Perfection 

Top and Bottom Plates. 



orso Clippers and Machines 




Boker's Horse Clippers 

Burman's Newmarket " " 



^\ 



^P 


\ 


^ 


o 


go 


o 


_- - 


o 


^"~ o 




- ' - 





Newmarket 

Top and Bottom Plates 



:0^ 



(ZZD 



Wwvwvwwww\/ 

Stewart's Patent Knife Plates 

'Top Plate, One Hole. 



OAK LAKE 




Oak Lake Horse Clipper 

Three in One. Nickel Plated. 



o 



o 



Stewart's Patent Knife Plates 

Bottom Plate, One Hole. 





20th Century Clipper 

Has 12-in. Positive Gear Drive; Steel Flexible Shaft i]/ 2 feet long. 
Complete with one set Stewart One-mit Tension Knives. Weighsla lbs. 



1902 Chicago Clipppe r 

All Gears Cut from Solid Metal, j 





New Stewart 

Inclosed Gear. 



For fuller particulars see our Hardware Catalogue. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., us,™ 



Our Prices are Right 



Opposite Union Station. 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Factory : Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont. 
6 



We 8hip promptly 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A Promise 



of good service is made by many an axe 
with its brightly polished edge, gilt 
head and brilliant label. But the dis- 
appointments are altogether too fre- 
quent. When selecting axes for your 
stock why not choose those which have 
been known for years for their reliability. 




Dunn's " Clipper " Axe is an 

axe we have sold for 20 years 
and have always found it reliable 
and it is still reliable. No 
better recommendation for an 
axe is wanted than such a record. 




The " Bedford Ebony " is 

another axe found for many 
years on our sales records. It 
is hand-made by expert axe 
makers and has the natural 
forge finish. 

Stock weights of these axes are 3 to 3^, 5% to 3^, 3>4 to 4, 

3^ to 4 J/2 -lb. 

We have Axe Handles 
Axe Stones 
Axe Wedges 

in large variety we ship 

them promptly. Write us when in a 

hurry. 



X 



2 x /i X l)£X/2 



jOSHANTEfi^ STQH£, 



*■ - ■«. « it Ar 






F.^W. 



Hardware 
Montreal 




FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited, MONTREAL, CANADA. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALS 



BAR IRON and STEEL 
BLACK SHEET IRON, TINNED SHEETS 

GALVANIZED IRON 

CANADA PLATES, TERNE PLATES 

SHEET TIN, INGOT TIN 

PIG LEAD 

SHEET ZINC, ZINC SPELTER 

IRON PIPE, VALVES and FITTINGS 

PULLEY BLOCKS and ROPE 

CHAIN 
ANVILS and VISES 
LUMBERING TOOLS 



MONTREAL and NAZI IM IM I F=»EO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 




No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted, Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




6 W ES * 

DIETRICH 

RUINED PATElffs, 



■shU^JI^TricH 

RAZOR STEEL 

MOO FORONECUT. 

, " *S0O- . '".0AYS\MPRK t 

■ $1000 , -_ WEEKS, - ( 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret proce 




m @ m i m 

No. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



Manufactured 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



GALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Brantford— Roofings 



This Represent* Our 







SIMPLE 



STYLE F. 



"ASPHALT" 

No. I, 2, 3 

"RUBBER" 

No. I, 2, 3 

Each ffo// /s complete with Nails 
and Cement to lay. Best selling 
goods In the market. 

BRANTFORD ROOFING CO. 

LIMITED 
BRANTFORD, ONTARIO 





TEIE 



LEADER 



A Name Familiar to Butter Makers in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churn* 



ITS ft I PONG POINTS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Levirand Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



8ALVANIZED FENCE HOOK HWz V 1 "™ weoD " "' CK,T *" w "" 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL OO., Limit. d, 



-LONDON, ONT 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

«5J^'^^//Z Toilet, Haul, Electric Po»«t 

V ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quauty Grooming and 
Bbeep-Sht&rlog Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

•DTD FOB CATALOCCI TO 
Iwrlw »«.ar.» ■'.. «... luku, I.B-CK. 

Weibu.ch k Hilger, limited special New York 
representative., i*-15 Murray Street. 





The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 





Peterborough, Ont. 



Manufacturers of all kinds 



Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Leading Jobbers 
In the Dominion. 



Oyllndor Night Latch, No. 103. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Serviceable 



Combination !^ TABLE 
Cabinet 



FOR 

HARDWARE 

TRADE 



A COM HI NATION THAT 
EVERYBODY MIST HAVE 



Price Complete 

LIS 

SILVER PLATED $22.30 

LIST 

$14.00 



LIST 



BEST 

NICKEL SILVER 



CONTENTS 

6 Table Knives 
6 Dessert Knives 
6 Table Forks 
3 Table Spoons 
6 Dessert Forks 
6 Dessert Spoons 
6 Tea Spoons 
2 Salt Spoons 
1 Mustard Spoon 

42 Pieces 

JOHN ROUND & SON, limited 

MANUFACTURING 

Cutlers and Silversmiths 

Factories MONTREAL Established 

SHEFFIELD, Eng. 1847 




8lze of Case 16 , -in. il4',-m. x 2%-in, 



►►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAGE 



PACKING 



LATH YARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jute 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Rope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: nONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F. H. ANDREW8 & 80N, Quebec CON8UMERS CORDAGE CO.. Limited, St. John, N.S. MacQOWAN & CO., Vancouver- 

TEES & PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. GEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg. Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Does This Concern You? 

J. H. Still Manufacturing Company, Limited, 
owns huge timber reserves of the best 
Hickory in the Southern States. 

There's an impost of 2. r >" a on all American 
Hickory Axe and Hammer Handles We 
import the raw material and manufacture 
ourselves. We have branded our three best 
lines for your protection. They are 

"Empire " 
" Imperial" 
"Champion " 

There is money in this for you. Write us 
and we will tell you how. 



J, H. Still Manufacturing Company, 

ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



Limited 




Take No Chances Because Hockey 

Sticks Set/ Other Things. But 

They Must be First-Class 

E. B. SALYERDS 

manufactures the highest grade of Hockey Sticks 
marketed on this continent. It will pay you to note this 
fact. • 

Wholesale and jobbing trade only supplied. 



E. B. SALYERDS 

PRESTON, ONT. CANADA 



Don't Be Caught 



like many canners were this year — 
with a short supply of cans and a 
large pack of fruitsand vegetables 
ready for canning. 

It is poor policy to put off order- 
ing your cans until the last min- 
ute, when chances are that the 
manufacturers cannot guarantee 
to supply the goods. 

Acme Cans are Cood Cans 



and give satisfaction. 

- Order from us to-day 



Acme Can Works 

MONTREAL 



: It Saves Lives : 



A Building Necessity 

These are the names that have 
been made synonymous with the 

AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

We are the manufacturers of it and 
control the patents. 

We have placed it on some of the 
finest buildings in the Dominion. 

It is a scientific fact that no modern 
buildings can afford to neglect sani- 
tation. 

We are contractors and sanitary ex- 
perts. Our ventilator is guaranteed 
and is placed in position to suit the 
building as to quality and size. 
One Testimony : 

Montreal, June l'.'ili, 1903. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Companv. 
Messrs. J. \V. Harris Co., Limited, 

7 St. Elizabeth St., Montreal, Que. 
Gentlemen. — Answering yours of June 1st, I am 
not personally familiar with the merits of the 
"AEOLIAN" Ventilators but our Assistant Engi- 
neer. Mr. F. Crossley. reports that the Ventilators 
of this type manufactured by you and used by tins 
Company^ the Place Viger Hotel, Chateau Fron- 
tenac. Windsor Street Station and elsewhere, have 
proved satisfactory. Vours truly , 

E H. McHsNRY, Chief Engineer. 

The J. W. HARRIS CO., Limited 

Successors to LESSARD & HARRIS 

General Contractors and Manufacturers 

MONTREAL 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Four Reasons why iNVICTUS FIBRE is the BEST FIBRE PAPER on the Market 

:tur. 1-ihrc is nude from personally selected pulp wood cut on our own limits. 

U pulp »ood is amin rigidlv culled on arrival at our mills 
pulp from which luvlctus Fibre is made is manufactured in our own pulp mill and transferred 
nee to the paper mill, avoiding all drawbacks of transportation. 

:tus Fibre will increase in strength and not grow hard and brittle as does fibre made from sul- 
phite pulp. This is a quality of the peculiar and selected pulp from which I nvictus Fibre is made. 
• ImjI ordtt ml! condnce you that we are correct. Set that each package beats the words "Invictus Fibre." Every ream 

contains 480 sheets 
This design ;i guarantee of quality. 

CANADA PAPER CO . LIMITED. 

"Headquarters for high grade Fibre and Manilla Papers" 

Toronto. Montreal. Windsor Mills, P.O. 




Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 
the load yourself with 

The Burr Self-Locking 
Tackle Block Saves the labor of two or three 
GOO to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Burr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 




Cap Screws, Set Screws, 
Machine Screws, Cold Pressed 
Nuts, Studs, Coupling Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS. TORONTO. 0NT. 

District Offloes : Montreal, Halifax. Ottawa, Winnipeg, 
Vancouver, Roseland 




Scrap Iron for Re-working 

Better bars for re-working are obtained from selected scrap than from 
pig iron — have more life and strength. 

London Bars are made from selected scrap and come in Flats, Rounds, 
Squares, Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half-Rounds and Bands. 

Large stock always on hand, insuring prompt shipment bi 

London Rolling Mills 

London, Canada. 





A complete assortment of CAGES 
always in stock; All sizes, styles and 
prices. Brass and Japanned. VVitli or 
without guards. Discount on applica- 
tion. 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., - HAMILTON, CAN. 



The Bowmanville Foundry Co., Limited 

Bowmanvllle, Ont 




Makers of Good Goods Only. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Inveitigation and auditing of all 
classes of accounts undertaken. 
Trading, profit and loss accounts 
and balance sheets prepared. Sets 
of books opened and office systems 
devised in an up-to-date manner. 
Collection of accounts a specialty. 

PERCY P. DAVENPORT 



622 Mclntyre Block, 



WINNIPK, MAN. 



Square your accounts 

INTERNATIONAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY, Limited 

OTTAWA, - - ONTARIO. 

Manufacturer* ot strictly high-grade Portland Cement 
made by the most improved method ot manufacture in 
existence. Each barrel contains three hundred and fifty 
pounds ot pure Portland Cement with no adulteration. 

The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

Manufactu reri of the celebrated 

'Saugaen Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

I'ricei on application. Prompt shipment 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Let us 
Help You 
Increase 
YourBusiness 

Why not go after 

and get the fire brick 
trade in your locality. 

Our expert informa- 
tion is at your com- 
mand and will enable 
you to make this a pay- 
ing line. 

Make this one of the 
New Year resolutions 
and KEEP IT. 



Francis Hyde & Co, 

Contractors 

and 

Foundry Supplies 

31 WELLINGTON ST. 
MONTREAL 




Why Not Buy in Canada 
Why Not Buy the Best 

Write for Price List before 
placing orders for 

FOOD CHOPPERS 



All parts tinned and inter- 
changeable. 

Every machine is guaran- 
teed. 

These Choppers are 
made in four sizes, 
and each Chopper 
has five (5) knives. 



SHIR.REFF MANUFACTURING CO. 



BROCKVILLE, ONT. 



Are you interested in any of the lines that are advertised ? 
A Post Card will bring you price list and full information. 
Don't forget to mention Hardware and Metal. 



A. RUDD dt CO., St. Helens, Lancashire, England 



Manufacturers of highest grade 




Gi i 7 j r n r i Ft I 1 U ft II nC In all patterns. Also Circle Boards. Seam Compasses, Cauge 
LAZ.IC.Kd UIHInUIIUO Glass Cutter, Boxwood Squares and Laths, plate Class Nippers 
_^^=^^=^^=^=^=^==^=^ Atmospheric Soldering Irons, etc., etc., etc., 



Canadian Agent : J. D. GIBSONE, P.O. Box No. 4-76, MONTREAL 



NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities durable in a Door 
Closer They work silently an I effectually, and 
never get out of order. In use in many of the 
public buildings throughout Great Britain 
the Colonies. 

MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham 




OUR LINES ARE SELLERS 



I 



Why Not Write for Particulars? 

FARLEY WORKS, SHEFFIELD, ENG 
CABLE ADDRESS "SUPERIOR" 

CEORCE PHILLIPS & CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Silverware, Electroplate and Cutlery 

We also make the best Razor on the market. Four exclusive brands with advertised names that will help 
every dealer. It costs a two cent stamp to find out about these solid old country lines wh.ch you cannot 
duplicate elsewhere. ALL MONEYMAKERS. 

OFFICE FOR CANADA, PACKARD BUILDING, MONTREAL telephone m 557 



18 



HARDWARI AND METAL 



HENCKEL'S RAZORS 

OF WORLD-WIDE REPUTATION 

FROM STOCK AND FOR IMPORT. 




THE TRADE SUPPLIED BY 



F.W. LAMPLOUGH&CO 9 




L 




The John Morrow Screw, Limited 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



CELEBRt cD 



HEINISCH «« 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

ftOKHOWLtBtlD TNI BIST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SI^rTnT'S^.a" Ch '- b,r ' n 



SEYMOUR 

SMEAR CO. 



TKJlVX MASK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 

HAVE BEEN THE 
Standard for over Half a Century. 



"QUALITY UNQUE3TION1 1» 
Each pair of our shears bears Ih- above lra<le mark. 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



Umx£ 



CompleU Llue TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS 
ur.U TAILORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Cu/npany 

WIEIUSOH * HILOIR, Limited, NEW YORK, S I* A t «ntg. 




Latest Cata 
logue will be 

sent in 
exchange for 
your business 



Cov*»i--t IVIfg. Oo. 




50— Swivel. 



510— Double . 



*TRBBT PAVINQ and SIDE WALK S* SPECIA LTY 

SILICA BARYTIC STONE CO. 

OF ONTARIO, Limited. 

Head Office 

Inger.soil, Ontario. 

Walter Mills, General Manage' 
Ask for quotations for 



Water Proof Floors for 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel- 
lar, Stable Floors, etc- 



Hemic Tanks. 



"The Tool Holder People" 

ARMSTRONG 
BROS. TOOL CO. 

Manufacturers of Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

106 N. Francisco Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 




GAMING 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



LOOK OUT FOR THIS TRADE MARK 




ON 



ENAMELLED AND GALVANIZED WARE 

IT MEANS QUALITY 



Write for Catalogue 



Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 

115-121 Brock Ave. and 79-31 Florence St. 

TORONTO, ONT. 



«^ K "™^« World's Best Cutlery 

^ft^ fa» * njjj You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

• ^ JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS, Limited 

^•flNTED ^ when ordering cutlery. A reputation of over 200 years 

at stake, intures the quality of every article. 

Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HUTTON & COMPANY, MONTREAL 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 



Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with th«* Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage. 84 80. ) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



"QUALITY UNSURPASSED.' 

TORONTO and BELLEVILLE 

ROLLING MILLS 

LIMITED. 

BELLEVILLE, - ONTARIO. 



fc vvwvwwww^w\^w 



WE ARE IN A POSITION TO FILL ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY FOR 



BAR IRON 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Dennis' Iron Stable Fittings 

Sanitary, Indestructible, Economical 

A good line for the hardware dealer. 

Send for New Stable Fittings Catalogue and 

Price List "A." 

DENN/S IRON & WIRE WORKS, Ltd. 

LONDON, - ONTARIO 



Buy the Best. 




A HANDY METHOD for repairing boxes or 
binding 2 or 3 small ones together, use 

Warminton's Clutch Nails 

Also strapping, hoop iron and specialties 
for the shipping dept. 

Write for samples to 

J.N. WARMINTON 

43 Scctt St., Toronto 207 St. James St., Montreal 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Stir Brand Cotton Twine 

Por Sal. by all Wholeial. Dealar.. 



Persons addressing advertisers will kindly 
mention having seen their advertisement in 
Hardware and Metal. 



B. A. GRAUTOFF & CO. 

8 Fenchurch Buildings, London, E.C. 
Import and Export. 

Old established house with highest connections in 

Great Britain and on the Continent of Europe. 
Cable Address, " Grautoff London," Liebers Code. 




SPADES, SHOVELS, Etc. 

Entrust your trade to the house that 
can supply the "just right" Spades and 
8hovel8. 

By getting in touch with 
us you will become ac 
quainted with the favorite 



"Peterborough," "Lundy," "Irwin," and 'Hill" 

Send in a postcard for our Catalogue and you will see where we stand. 

The Peterborough Shovel & Tool Company, Limited, Peterborough, Out. 






Peerless Freezers 

Increase your freezer business. 




Takes a woman 
off her knees 



by selling the freezer the women want — because with 
/'/ they make ice-cream with real satisfaction. The 
cook's favorite. Known to all women through adver- 
tisements in their favorite magazine. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER 

THE DANA MFG. CO.. Cincinnati. 10 Warren St.. New York. 

16 




Write for Dana Food 
Chopper Catalogue 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Peerless Woven Wire Fence 



Here is a fence that will sell. Once up no need for repairs. 
It lasts for years— just what you are looking for. It's horse- 
high, pig-tight and bull-strong. No stock can [get over, 
under or through it. The most unruly animal can't butt it 
down and there are no barbs to tear and injure stock. It's 

WIND AND WEATHER PROOF 

The Peerless lock holds it perfectly rigid and the wires can't 
slipup, down, nor sidewise. Cold weather won't snap it 
and hot weather won't make it sag. It's the greatest thing 
out for farmers, stockmen and all other fence users which 
makes it a red hot proposition for dealers. It comes in rolls 
all ready to put up. It's easy to handle. Write for prices. 

The Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Company, Ltd. 

Dept. J, Hamilton, Ont. 



ESTABLISHED 1795 






JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 



WOLVERHAMPTON 




CHAIN 

Proof, BB, BBB, Cable, 
Stud Link, Etc. 

Thischair is manufactured from a Special 
Ciradc of Solt Steel, by a reliable maker, 
.in l not bought in the open market. 
Qu >tations to the trade on application. 

JAMES BARBER, Era Works, 

Sheffield 

HIGHEST GRADES OF 
TABLE and POCKET CUTLERY 
RAZORS, CARVERS, Etc. 



J. H. ROPER 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 

82 St. Francois Xavier St., MONTREAL 



42 




°3$*i 



DOMINION 

CARTRIDGES 



< : 



m I 






You may be 




able to get along without 
DOMINION AMMUNITION, but can you., 
afford to ? Even though it were not a sav- 
ing to your business, you ought to have 
DOMINION CARTRIDGES and paper 
shells in stock, because they give absolute 
satisfaction ; bring new customers into your 
store, and the old ones back again. 

Insist on DOMINION AMMUNITION, 

and if your jobber won't supply you, 
write us. 



\ 



DOMINION CARTRIDGE CO. 

Limited 

Montreal 



/* 







K*^ 






*«. 




t»/ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PROOF POSITIVE 

The success of the 
dealers who have 
handled " The Joy 
Malleable Range" 
in the older Pro- 
vinces (where the 
"malleable con- 
struction " was un- 
known) during the 
year 190G is Proof 
Positive that the 
People will buy The 
Best Goods if the 
dealers will stock 
them, and will take the trouble to explain their superior 
qualities. 

There is neither satisfaction nor credit in selling 
Ranges that have little but price to recommend them, 
and permanent business cannot be built up in any such 
way. The JOY is doubtless the best value offered to 
the Canadian people. Will you try them, now ? 




I 



iav tlff^ #*A 32 tlumberside Ave., 
JUI FirU. tU M TORONTO, ONT. 

TEES& PERSSE CO., - Western Distributors, Winnipeg 
CHA8. H. FOX, - Agent for British Columbia, Vancouver 



A Trade 
Builder. 



Were ten dealers to make 
the same declaration 
about this range that 
would make us quite airy. 
But when hundreds of 
Dealers call 



The 

Empire 

Queen 

Range 

the b«»t trade builder in Canada— well, we are proud of their 
deoision. 

Quality goods always impress the shrewd Dealer. He can make 
strong claims and the article will prove them true. 

The Empire Queen is the range that the economic and orderly 
housewife insists on. And it's the range the Dealer recommends 
for several reasons. If you don't know them let us mail you a 
handsome booklet about this range. 




The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 



OWEN SOUND, Ontario, 



Limited, 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limitad, 238 King St., Winnipeg, Man. 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO.. 126 West Craig St. 
Montreal, Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



From 
1865 



To 
1907 



FORTY-ONE YEARS 

We have been pounding away making horse nails for the past forty-one years. Long 
enough to know how to make them don't you think? And have a fair acquaintance with the 
wants of the horseshoers who use them, and the hardware trade who sell them. And yet we 
haven't learned all. There is another firm whose representatives "know it all/' in fact it is stated 
1 they are going to put us out of business in a year;" have a case of wine put up with our friend 
K. to this effect. Well! Well ! Tennyson said in the Brook, "Men may come and men may 
go, but I go on for ever." We are going to try and hold Out the year 1907, if not forever, and 
we think our "C" brand horse nails are of such good quality and that we have made friends 
enough in Canadian Hardware trade during the past forty-one years, to warrant us in thinking 
we shall. Will you do your share, by ordering the "C" brand. Don't accept substitutes; 
insist on having the brand of horse nails you order and let it always be the "G" brand. 

WISHING OUR FRIENDS A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR, 

Canada Horse Nail Company 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

MONTREAL 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



We Have Worked Out Your Problem. 




When you go home at five 
o'clock, there is no reason why 
you should have your after-dinner 
smoke spoiled with a lot of wor- 
ries over little details of your 
business. 

There is no need for you to jot down memo- 
randa on the back of an envelope for to-morrow. 

If your books were arranged on a proper 
system, they would shoulder all these petty 
details for you to-morrow morning they would 
show you everything you want to know just at 
the moment you want to know it. 



Business Systems leave petty routine to 
your books. 

Business Systems do the work but leave 
you time to think and plan and act. 



Business Systems leave nothing to chance 
and allow no possibility of anything being for- 
gotten. 

Business Systems enable one clerk to do 
the work of two and to do it more accurately. 



We would like to go into this matter with 
you either in your office or in ours at your 
convenience. 

A request to know more about Business 
Systems, will not obligate you. 

SUSTVESS 



UMTTED 
84 S PADINA AVE. 

TORONTO, CANADA 




1906 



For what you have done for us during the year 
just past we thank you. Our sales of Axes have 
exceeded any former year. 



1907 



Promises to be the most prosperous year that 
Canada has ever experienced. We trust you will 
share in this prosperity. We mean to surpass all 
former efforts, both in the quantity and the 
quality we turn out, and we want your order. 




The Dundas Axe Works 



To be continued. 



DUNDAS, ONT. 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H 



LAID OU 



RE 



is t lie one which displays the most goods. 

There are few mea who can describe just what they want 
but if they see it sampled on a shelf box they ran point it out. 
Which is the - or a man to point out the article he 

wants, or for you to untie half a dozen packages to show him 
what you have in stock i 

Your s ilesrnen should be employed in selling goods, not 
in looking for goods, in untying packages and tying them up 
in. 

Shelf Boxes improve the appearance of your store 100%. 



The Bennett Steel Shelf Box is the best box on 

the market in Canada or the United States. 

It has galvanized steel sides and bottom, and thus saves 
at least 20 shelf room. The steel is not nailed to the wood 
front, but is locked in by our own patented process. 

The Bennett Box is more durable than a wooden box. of 
has been tested for fifteen years and we have never heard It 
one man who was dissatisfied. 

Note the "lip" on box, this renders it dust proof. Write 
for catalogue and price list. 



CAMERON e* CAMPBELL, 



Mil 

MANUFACTURERS 



TORONTO 




Registered Trade Mark 



BETTER THAN EVER 

THE FOUR MAPLE LEAF BRANDS 

BINDER TWINE FOR 1907 

GILT EDGE-650 ft. Pure Manila. 

GOLD LEAF-600 ft. Manila. 

SILVER LEAF— 550 ft. Standard Manila. 
MAPLE LEAF— 500 ft. Standard. 

Good Material; Bright, Clean, Smooth, Even CORD, of unusual Length and 
Strength. Specially Treated to make it "Insect Proof." 

Agents wanted in localities where we are not now represented. 
Write us for SAMPLES and our new ROPE and CORDAGE price list. 




THE BRANTFORD CORDAGE CO., Ltd. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. 



KEMP'S Steam Cereal Cooker 

M m New Patent 



A simple inex- 
pensive kitchen 
utensil. 




it maybe used 
in WO different 
ways. 



104 
4 



Made in three sizes 

106 108 

6 8 pints 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, ONT. 



THE KEMP MFG. CO. OF MONTREAL 

58 McGill St., Montreal, Que 



THE KEMP MFG. AND METAL CO., Limited 

McDermot Ave. E„ Winnipeg, Man. 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



OF MUTUAL INTEREST 

A Page of Gossip and Shop Talk 



Many complaints have been received 
from subscribers during the past month 
uboul the tion-receipl of copies of 
Hardware and Metal Isenl them. In 
every ease the fault musl res! with the 
I oslal department as our mailing lias 
been dene promptly each Friday even 
ing and musl Ontario subscribers 
should receive the paper on Saturday. 
l! is aunoj ing I" pay for a paper and 
uoi gel it, l)ul il is also annoying to 
mail a paper and then be blamed for 

nun delivery. 

* • * 

The postal department is undoubtedly 
overtaxed during the holiday season, 

hut when it takes lour days to deliver 

a letter mailed in Toronto to another 
Toronto address and Christmas parcels 
received in Toronto befpre Dec, 25 are 
not delivered until New Year's Day, 
there is something radically (wrong with 
the postal service. The desire to con- 
duct i lie -.ci \ ice on too cheap a scale 
is undoubtedly one reason for the in- 
capacity of the department. No busi- 
ness (public or private) can he con- 
ducted successfully by treating IPs em- 
ployes in such a niggardly way as the 
country postmasters and the city post- 
man are being treated. They should 
be paid decent wages n,ud expected to 
give good service in return. One result 
of the poor remuneration given coun- 
try postmasters is their recent demand 
that they he allowed to compile lists 
of farmers names for sale to the mail 
order houses. 

* * * 

Talking about the postal department 

brings to mind the agitation Hardware 
and Metal has helped to foster in op- 
position to the proposed parcels post 

c.o.d. collections system, by Which coun- 
try postmasters would hecome collection 
agents tor the mail order houses — and 

undertakers for some of the smaller 
local merchants whose taxes help to 
keep the smaller municipalities going. 

Hardware and Metal took- up (he agit- 
aiioii as soon as it was learned that 
the mail order houses were sharpening 

their knives in preparation to take 
their 'pound of llesh from the retail 
trade. As a result of our exposure of 

the plan dozens of Members of Parlia- 
ment have promised to guard the in- 
terests of their constituents and thou- 
sands of letters of protest have been 
sent to the Postmaster General. Meet- 
ings of local merchants have been 

called and dry goods men, hardware 
men and other retailers have co-operat- 
ed by sending a joint letter of pro- 
test to Ottawa. 

* * * 

The Ontario Retail Hardware As- 
sociation has also done good work- by 
notifying every Ontario hardwareman 
of the danger of the proposed legisla- 



tion and i he' l*i Mow ing lei ter is only one 

of do/ens received showing thai the 

trade is at work and "if everybody 

hustles success seems easy.'' 

Leamington, Dee. -'7. 1906. 

Dear Sirs, On the receipt of Hard- 
ware ami Metal over a week ago tllC 
w lite,' personally called on several busi- 
ness men in town requesting them to 
write to Mr. Clarke, who is I he member 
in Ottawa representing South Essex. 
We also personally wrote, covering the 
whole ground as fully as possible. Ilis 
home is in Windsor, and he is now home 
for Christmas holidays, lie wrote 

from the latter place stating he would 
he down here helore lie went hack to 
Ottawa, some are looking for him 

every day. If everybody hustles suc- 
cess seems easy. 
Yours tuly, 

Greenshield & Moffat. 
1 eamington, Out. 

That it is the trade newspapers that 
the retailers must look to to prol vt 
their inter.>-;td has been amply pro. en 
again and again, Associations are a 
splendid thin",-. They are necessary 
and no sensible body of men engaged 
in similar work will remain unorganiz- 
ed. Men go into business for a profit 
and they should organize to ensure that 
they getaprofil rather than a deficit But 
no association of retailers can prosper 
without the support of the trade news- 
paper-. 

The subserviency of the daily press 

to departmental store interests is also 

beyond doubt hut if additional proof 

was required it is supplied by their 

suppression and misstatement id' the 

facts in connection with the killing- of 

a woman in an elevator accident in 

Eaton's Toronto store, and the serious 

injury of several girls when a crowded 

elevator fell in Simpson's store a 

fortnight later. 

• * * 

Another incident showing the value 
of the trade newspaper was furnished 
lasl week by president A. W. Hum- 
phries, id' the Ontario Retail Hardware 
Association. Mr. Humphries wanted to 
sell a set of tinsmith's tools. He ad- 
vertised twice in the (Jlohe, got sev- 
eral answers hut did nol get an offer 
for the tools at the price asked. He 
advertised once in Hardware and Metal. 
The ad. was received, too late for classi- 
fication and Mi'. Humphries failed to 
find it when looking through the 
paper. He got^several replies, how- 
ever, and looking again found the ad. 
One who replied was Clayton Brown, 
Enterprise, Out. Being told that the 
price \va s $250 and assured that they 
were r.s represented he immediately 
sent a cheque for the amount without 
seeing the tools. When he did receive 
them he was so delighted that he wrote 
21 



his thanks to Mr. Humphries, and said 
he would not re-sell the set for less 
than $350. 

Ii doesii 'i need a sledge hammer to 

d i ive home I hi' moral : I lardw are and 
Metal want ads. bring results. 
« * * 

The editor has some g fa things in 

store tor readers of Hardware and 
Metal. There are some bright and 
brainy Canadian retailers who know 
how lo use the pen and several of them 
have promised to give readers of the 
paper the benefit of their experience. 
Every retailer will he interested in Hie 
article on "Retail P.usiness Methods," 

h.'. A. !■',. Provost, Ottawa, in this issue 
and even more interest will he taken 
ill other articles which are to follow. 
At present we can announce the early 
publication of an able article on "The 
Percentage of Profit," by Fred »'. 
Lariviere, Montreal, two on "Why I 
Started the Cash System," and "The 

Cash System in Operation," by A. B. 
Cote, Morris, Man., and another in- 
teresting contribution bj M. !•'. Irwin, 
the new manager of McClary's branch 
at St. John, N.B.. 

Our Ontario man go! in conversation 
with a traveler tor a Western Ontario 
woodenware house the other day in the 
town of Bolton. After the usual salu- 
tation, " What 's your line" thej sta 
in to discuss trade papers. Our wood- 
enware friend at once remarked thai he 
wished their linn would advertise in 
Hardware and Metal, as it would 
make it so much easier for him to sell 
goods, and would he a ureal help in 
opening new accounts, lie stated that 
he would try and induce his manager to 
lake space in Hardware and Metal this 
year, as he had great faith in the re- 
Suits, and said his house would thank 
him for the suggestion at the end of 
next year. 

" I am well pleased wit 1 1 the imp; - 
ments constantly being made in Hard- 
ware and Metal." is the way L. Wale. 
of Stevensvillc. Out., expresses hiln-el! 
in a letter in which he renewed his sub- 
scription. 

1 consider Hardware and Metal the 
finest trade paper in the Dominion, re- 
cently wrote E. I'. Paulin, Goderich, 
one id' the active executive members of 
the Ontario Retail Hardware Associa- 
tion. 

"I appreciate the usefulness of 

Hardware and Metal and as surely as 
if is an absolute necessity amongst 
hardw areinen so is good window dress- 
ing: an absolute necessity for prosperity. 
and in my opinion the cheapest method 
of advertising," wrote W. G. Pow, re- 
cently. Mr. Cow was on the road for 
the Hobbs Manufacturing Co. last sum- 
mer, lint is now managing W. R. Hobbs' 
retail store at Tillsonburg. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE TURN OF THE YEAR 

A Glance at the Past and a View Into the Future — Comments on Trade Conditions by 

Jobbers and Manufacturers. 



"The company is doing the. 

-t business in its hist 
The above can be said of almost every 
business concern in Canada. Fill in the 
uame of any manufacturing companj or 
any jobbing or retail house and a storj 
is told thai in all but a very leu in 
stances is true, so great is the general 
prosperity in all parts of the country. 
The remarkable volume of trade done 
•"> made it difficult to promise bet 
esults in 1906, but with the ezcep 
tion of a tow places building and gener 
al business has totaled t<. a greater vol- 
ume in 1906 than in the twelve months 
pre\ i 

Looking Forward. 
The same conditions would make L1 
hard to forecast the possibilities of 
were it not for the heavy booking 
rders which manufacturers report, 
the capacity of many plants having al- 
ready been contracted tor as far ahead 
as nine months. Prices of nearly every 
are very still and the tendencj is 
still upward', advance following advance 
so fast that few are able or desirous of 
king up with goods heavily. 
Merchants can well afford to mark up 
all stocks in hand to present ruling 
prices as seems unlikely that there will 
be any decline during 1907, while it is 
improbable that stocks can be replen- 
ished at former prices. Far from affect- 
ing the demand for goods adversely, the 
high prices seem to stimulate trade and 
encourage even greater buying, all elass- 
ipearing to be prosperous and will- 
ing to spend money freely. Unless 
something unforseen happens, the com- 
ing vear's business will eclipse the splen- 
did "records made during the past two 
years. 

Big Year for Building. 
Alex. McArthur & Co., the well 
known paper' manufacturers, stated 
that the past year had been an active 
one in all the various lines of building 
paper, owing to the new buildings and 
extensions which have gone up all over 
Canada, in keeping with the prosperitj 
which seems to pervade every section. 
A better appreciation by the public is 
also noticeable in regard to the insu- 
lating advant paper and felt on 
all kinds of buildings, thi aes of 
heat and cold within them being re- 
duced to a minimum at a trifling cost. 
The cost of material has advanced and 
prices of the product are likely to re- 
main firm. 
New Factories Ensure Competition. 
Adam Taylor. Secretary of tin- Tay- 
lor-Forbes Co I rnelph, states that his 
firm looked for big business in 1906, 
and their expectations have been fully 
realized. The demand for hardware 
line~ and heating goods has been extra- 
ordinarily large, and price- have been 
very low in comparison with the cost 
of materials and labor. During 1907 
higher prices are certain to be- the 



Mile, as it is evident that iron will 

continue high during 1907 ami lower 

cannot be expected until well on 

into 1908 Hot water boilers are likel\ 

i.. ad\ ance at once, while quotal ions on 
hardware line^ are withdrawn, and all 
orders subject to the price- ruling on 

the da\ the order w a - taken Mr. Tay 
lor was ^er\ enthusiastic about the 
outlook for trade in Canada in future, 
lint pointed out there is certain to be 
plentj of competition. The numerous 
new plants and extensions to old ones, 
will provide lor a very Large increase in 
the outpttf of Canadian factories and 
foundries. 

Paints "Brightening Up.' 

In discussing the paint and oil situa- 
tion, William 11. Evans of the Can- 
ada Paint Company, remarked to 
"Hardware and Metal" as follows : 

"The year 1906 has been characteriz- 
ed by a tremendous enquiry lor paint- 
ing material of every description. This 
industry has made rapid strides in Can- 
ada, and capital has not been " back- 
ward in coming forward" to aid and 
build up the rapidly increasing indus- 
tries of varnish and paint making- Lin- 
seed oil and turpentine have kept some- 
what along steady lines, but white lead 
has met with a sharp advance which 
has been well maintained and zinc has 
also felt the world's call for an increas- 
ed supply of metals in the arts and in- 
dustries. 

Profits to some extent have been cur- 
tailed, owing to the prices received 
from the trade not keeping pace with 
the enhanced values which prevail for a' 
large number of the chemicals and crude 
articles which enter into the composi- 
tion of paint colors and varnishes. 
Labor is much higher, and all through 
the lists costs show a marked apprecia- 
tion which will have to be reckoned 
with in marking prices for 1X07. 

Even at the advances which are in- 
evitable, a very large business for 1901 
is assured, and the large factories seem 
to be running on full time right through 
the holiday season to keep pace with 
the healthfulness and enthusiasm which 
is everywhere apparent in Canada." 

Heating Goods Active. 

W. J. Cluff, of Cluff Bros., Toronto, 
selling agents for Warden King & Sons, 
Montreal, is enthusiastic over the 
amount of business his firm has done 
during the past year. The demand for 
all classes of heating supplies has been 
phenomenal, and their chief difficulty 
has been in securing prompt deliveries 
of supplies which are not manufactured 
by themselves. Mr. Cluff says that 
conditions will be better in the future, 
as arrangements are under way to man- 
ufacture radiators and other supplies, 
so that their customers can have the 
advantage of securing goods of one 
manufacturer. During the past year, 
Cluff Bros, have erected a magnificent 
warehouse in Toronto, and they are now 

22 



building up the : r stock in order to keep 
pace with tile increased demand they 
look for during 1907. 

A Year of Prosperity. 

"We believe that no such year of 
prosperity as the one which is past has 
ever been known in the hardware and 
metal trades,'' said W. .1. Fuller, presi 
dent of the Canadian Fairbanks Com 
pany, Montreal. "Prices have been con- 
stants advancing, and if the merchants 
had taken proper advantage of increas 
ed values of their stocks they should 
show very handsome profits at the end 
of the year. 

"During the year the Canadian Fair- 
banks Co. has put into operation its 
large plant at Toronto for the manu- 
facture of gas and gasoline engines, 
steam pumps and other of its special- 
ties, and is endeavoring to become as 
rapidly as possible, handlers of Can- 
adian-made goods only. They have in 
view the coming year, the establishment 
of their scale and valve factory, for 
which a site has already been secured 
in the Eastern Townships and which 
will be in operation before June 1st. 
Every one of the factories which the 
company represents is filled with orders 
for months to come, and there is every 
prospect that the year ]<907 will see a 
much larger volume of business than 
the year 1906. 

"We are carefully on the outlook for 
any indications which will point to a 
climb in prices in raw materials so that 
we may take proper notice and not lie 
caught with stocks of high-priced goods. 
This is something which every one must 
realize the importance of." 

Prospects for 1907. 
"The year just closed has been the 
best since the branch opened here. As 
far as I can see the prospects are 
equally good for 1907 so it will be up 
to me to keep up the record," writes 
M. F. Irwin, the new manager of the 
St. John, N.B., branch of the McClary 
Manufacturing Company. The McClary 
business at St. John is steadily grow- 
ing and the enlargements and changes 
now being made should mean a con- 
siderable increase in their Maritime 
trade. Being a practical tinsmith, Mr. 
Irwin should make a success of the new 
factory being established to supply the 
eastern trade. 

Poor Deliveries Chief Fault. 
James G.. Lewis, vice-president of 
Lewis Bros., Montreal, said the year 
that has just closed has been the most 
prosperous in the history of his com- 
pany, they having found the trade anx- 
ious to buy goods and the fault has 
been the poor deliveries made by the 
many factories. There is no doubt that 
the present century will belong to Can- 
ada to a larger extent than to any 
other country and the amount of the 
purchases made by the trade and the 
hardware merchants in particular will 



HARDWARE AND MtTAL 



astonish those who have bora in busi 

ncss [or tli<' last twentj years. For the 
present year they recommend all retail 
merchants to place their orders at once, 
tor, while deliveries may be bad now. 
thej will lie worse a few months hence 
Those who have gooas to sell should 
ask the market, price as the> will have 
no trouble in disposing ol thru stocks 

Big Year in West. 
W. S. Brook, western representative 
of the Ontario Lead & Wire Com] 

and the Standard Ideal Sauil:n\ Com 
pany, who has been in Toronto during 
the holiday season, states that last 
year was the best in the history of the 
plumbing trade in Western Canada. 
There has been a tremendous demand 
for all (dasses of supplies and it. has 
been difficult to keep up with the de- 
mand, but Canadian manufacturers have 
succeeded in doing so with a very small 
share of the trade going to United 
States houses. Mr. Brock looks for an 
equally good trade during 1907 ; the 
building industry in the West showing 
no signs of falling off. 

Guessing as to the Future. 
The Thos. Davidson Manufacturing 
Company had a fine year and stated 
that for the year L906 the stamped and 
enamelled ware trade along with other 
trades using steel as the basis of their 
supplies have paid advancing prices for 
their raw materials and had difficulty in 
obtaining deliveries. The volume of 
trade was large, but the prices of the 
products were not in keeping with the 
advanced cost. There, however, wire 
practically no bad debts, which will 
compensate to some extent for the low 
prices. The trend of the business seems 
to be manufacturing in larger quanti- 
ties and establishing distributing de- 
pots to accomplish quick deliveries in 
all parts of the country. Besides the 
advance in the price of steel two of our 
other raw materials have advanced to 
prices making a record, viz., pig tin 
to 43c. per pound and sheet copper to 
29c. per pound, so that we are kept 
guessing as to the future. 

Higher Prices Predicted. 

"Regarding the outlook for the mixed 
paint and white lead trade during the 
coming season," writes John A Straith, 
president of- the Standard Paint and 
Varnish Works Company, Windsor, Ont. 
"in our opinion it is exceedingly 
bright. If we were to judge the future 
by past experiences it is bound to be 
good. Our past year's business showed 
the usual increase on previous years 
business, and we have no reason for 
complaint. In our opinion all paint 
manufacturers along with ourselves will 
be obliged to further advance prices on 
mixed paints as well as white leads in 
the early spring. The present high 
prices of every commodity entering- in- 
to the manufacture of a good product, 
will we think, necessitate this move." 

Enlarging Rolling Mills. 

The Montreal Rolling Mills Company 
said in their opinion the year just 
closed had been one of the busiest and 
most prosperous in the experience of 
all classes of industry in this country. 
As far as they were concerned they had 
not been able to fill all the orders that 
had been sent in to them. The great 
development all over the country, par- 
ticularly in the Northwest, has created 



an unprecedented demand foi material 
manufaol m ed bj I b as rail 

ening ol -pikes, l,., it 

and tie plates, also wire nails, wiought 

pipe, etc 

Then aim w as alw a\ - to keep ab 
of the times in the way of facilitii 
tinning out goods that were most in 
demand, and in such quanl were 

called for; and with this end in View 
had now in the course of construction 
addit i'.m- and altera! ions to then plant , 
which the\ hoped would place them in 
a posit nil tfO t ake care of tin- w ant B of 

theix many customers, 

Big Demand for Paints. 

Mr. Benson, manager of the Sherwin 

William- Toronto branch, reports a very 
brisk year for 1906. Some of their tra- 
\elers while at the Cleveland conference 
estimated that I'm, sales would show 

an even greater increase. Everywhere 

building is active and that means a big 
demand for paints. 

Cordage Industry Depressed. 

A well known authority on binder 
twine gave the following more or less 
gloomy opinions : — 

The binder twine, cordage and twine 
requirements for the past twelve months 
' have naturally increased with the 
growth of the Dominion ; and it is re- 
grettable this expansion, for fol- 
lowing reasons, is not benefiting those 
factories established in Canada : — '75 per 
cent, of the binder twine for Canada's 
harvest is imported, being on the free 
list to the world; the greater portion 
from the United States, into which 
country Manila binder twine, exported 
from Canada, must pay 45 per cent. 
The British preferential tariff permits 
the importation of much low grade 
cordage, bearing the name of, but con- 
taining little, Manila hemp. The equal 
of this is not acceptable to buyers from 
home manufacturers. At two Canadian 
cities convict labor is employed making 
binder twine and cordage. Canada is 
gradually becoming a veritable dump- 
ing ground for low grade cordage. 

These conditions during the past three 
years have caused the failure or forced 
liquidation of seven factories. The dozen 
existing- manufacturing- plants, contend- 
ing as best they can with such serious 
obstacles, have now by the last Govern- 
ment Budget to face another, the free 
listing of cordage used by fishermen. 
Canadian grain, fish and farmers are 
second to none in the world, and surely 
do not require protection at the expense 
of one of the country's leading indus- 
tries, especially when there is- so much 
competition within the country to reg- 
ulate prices. With some re-adjustment 
by the powers that be, the 1907 out- 
look, so bright for the various indus- 
tries in our flourishing Dominion, could 
be considerably improved for the large 
interests in the cordage manufacture. 

A Banner Year. 

Rice Lewis & Son, wholesale hard- 
ware merchants of Toronto, report a 
banner year for 1906. As they were at 
all times taxed to their utmost to fill 
orders, the manufacturers being largely 
to blame for delays in shipments as 
goods could not be turned out quick 
enough. Stocks are being rapidly re- 
pleted. however, and in many cases ex- 
tensions added to factories to meet with 
the demand. The prospects for 1907 

23 



arc even brighter than a 
dei ■ iming in Bteadilj . 

Excellent Year's Trade. 

II. S. Ilowland, Sons & Co., whole- 
sale hardware mi nto, 
have had an excellent yeaj in all 
■ ■I then business, ordei being 
steadih and busine 
'out the year, 
outlook i"i L907 i- foi 
volume fch m in 1906, prices being 

firm and stock- low owing to t|,. 
demand and the SCarcitj in manv lines. 
The nail sit uat ion has for quite a t ime 
been bag to both jobber and 

retailei In a great mimbei ol 

""In not be Idled, and had to be 

ferred for spring shipment \i 
facturers are rapidly repleting 
stock in view of the large demand look 
ed for during 1901 



TRADE INQUIRIES. 

Correspondents desiring to get in touch with any ol 
the firms referred to should quote the reference number 
when requesting addresses. For information « 
Superintendent of Commercial Agencies. Department of 
I rade and Commerce. Ottawa. 

L518. Nuts ami bolts A Lanca- 
shire manufacturing firm desire, i,, ,,i, 
tain prices of nuts and bolts from 
Canadian exporters. 

loll). Handles — A Lancashire firm 

asks for prices of spade and pick 
handles from Canadian manufactu 

of same. 



1520. Hardwood 
shire firm asks 

hardwood stems, 

dies long by 

meter at one end. 



A l.anea- 

prices of 



steins 

2 feet 8 m- 
1 1-2 inches dia- 
redueing to 1 7-16 

from Canadian ex- 



inches at other 
porters. 

1544. A London linn, in the paint. 
color and varnish trade, contemplates 
appointing agents in different pari 
Canada, and is desirous of hearing 
from persons who arc in a position to 
entertain such business. 

1552. Fireworks — A London firm, 
manufacturing fireworks of all descrip- 
tions, wishes to get into touch with a 
first-class Canadian firm prepared to 
introduce and carry slocks of their 
goods. 

1553. Gas stoves — A Birmingham 

(inn. manufacturers of gas si 
would like to oct into touch with Can- 
adian importers of this line of goods. 

1554. Motor cars, motor cycles, 
forges, etc. — A Birmingham firm manu- 
facturers of motor cars, motor <•; 
cycles. forges, bellows and anvils, 
would like to he put in touch with Can- 
adian dealers in these line- of goods. 

1555. Electrical lighting apparatus 
A Birmingham firm desire to get in 

touch with Canadian imports of rough 
electrical lighting apparatus lor mines, 
factories, etc. 

I'i.'iG. Corrugated iron — A Birming- 
ham linn would like to get in touch 

with several (inns in Canada with a 
view to doing business in corrugated 

iron. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RETAIL BUSINESS METHODS 

An Address by A. £. Provost, Wholesale Groc&r, Before the Ottawa Retail Grocers' Association. 



"We are not here this evening," said 
Mr. Provost, "as a mutual admiration 
society, luii as a company of business men 
['or the very practical purpose of 
discussing the best methods of carrying 
on our, work. In the few words thai 1 
will address to you I w isli to speak some- 
what as 1 would to a young man who is 
about to take charge of a business t"i 
iving him such points ami sug] 
.1- I think mighl be of advantage 
to him. 

The first consideration lor a man em- 
barking in a business is the selection of 
a stand; hut as all of those present are 
probably located in premises where they 
expect to remain, I need not do more 
than mention that point. 

Relations With Customers. 

Once started in business, the next 
point you have to consider is what 
should be your relations with your cus- 
tomers. 1 would strongly recommend 
you to make the personal acquaintance 
of each one of your customers. Take 
occasion once in a while, if it he only 
once a week, hut whenever you have the 
chance, of paying some personal atten- 
tion to each one. waiting upon them. 
having a little chat with them, or pass- 
im: the time of day. In this way you will 
make them feel not only that you arc 
glad to see them in your store, hut that 
they will be glad to come. Your per- 
sonal acquaintance with your customers 
and establishing good relations with 
them in this way. will have the effect 
of attaching them to you so that you will 
not he. as some merchants are, largely 
at the mercy of their employes. For, 
remember that even your most popular 
salesman of to-day may be to-morrow in 
the employ of your business rival, and, 
but for your personal hold upon your 
customers, might induce some of them 
to transfer their trade to his new em- 
ployer. It is of course well to have 
salesmen of pleasant and obliging man- 
ners, but these are not all the qualities 
that they ought to possess. It is far 
more important that they should have 
that supreme qualification, th<' ability 
!,, sell goods, because that is what they 
aie there for. and not merely to be en- 
i( rlainers of your customers. 
Not Too Familiar. 

But here I must warn you against be- 
er familiar with your customers, 
which i- almost as great a fault as to 

be wanting in courtesy. My experience 

ha- been that 'very often a customer with 
whom yon become on loo friendly or in- 
timate terms is apl some day to presume 
on this to ask you for favors which you 
cannot, in justice to yourself or your 
grant. The tine relation be- 
tween a merchant ami his customers, as 



it appears to me. is something like that 
which exists in departmental stores lie 

tween the heads of departments and Boor 

walkers and the public. Thus far, but 
only thus far, do the proprietors of 
these great establishments appreciate 
the importance of personal relations 
with their customers. That is why we 

find them engaging for these positions 
the very merchant whom they have 
crowded out of business for themselves 

in the stress of competition. 

Good Goods Always. 
The next question for consideration is 
the purchasing of stock. It is very easy 
to say that the true rule is always to 
buy the best and buy it right, but as 
you all know it is pretty hard to earrv 




A. E. Provost, Ottawa. 

that rule out in practice. At the same 
time, I cannot lay too much stress on 
the importance of handling the very best 
goods that are suitable to your partic- 
ular trade. I must confess that I have 
a special prejudice against low-grade 
goods. If a customer tells you that 
some goods vim sold him were not up 
lo the mark, what satisfactory argument 
mi- defense have you in reply? No one 
can defend inferiority. Quality is re- 
membered long after price is forgotten 
that is an old and true adage in busi- 
ness id' eveiy kind. There is not a man 
ii this audience who complains of the 
price of his wife's hat if he thinks she 
looks pretty in il, and in business price 
is always secondary lo quality. 

Not Too Much at Once. 
Beware of the quantity men who try 
to indue, you t" purchase Large quanti- 
24 



ties of one line of goods, Using the de 

ccptive argument that live cases are so 
much cheaper than one. In my com- 
paratively brief experience in the whole- 
sale trade I have been one of the victims 
Of several failures and I have invariab- 
ly found that these large-quantity goods 

comprise most of the slock of the men 
who failed while they had not the means 
to stock properly with goods more 
ocnimonly in demand. One of the favor- 
ite arguments of these quantity men 
is the long terms offered- sixty days 
from the first of next month, and so 
on; but many a man has found that, 
even after the sixty days had expired 
and he had to pay for the goods, a 
large proportion of them were still on 
his hands. 

Speak to All Who Enter. 

In the selling of your goods, a word 
of salutation or greeting to your custo- 
mers when they come to your store is 
such an elementary requirement that 
it. is perhaps superfluous to suggest il. 
But in the press and hurry of business, 
men are very apt to overlook such lit- 
tle ads of courtesy, and lei customers 
wait for some minutes without notic- 
ing them. Even when serving one cus- 
tomer, it is very easy en passent to- 
say a word id' greeting to another who 
has just come in, with the assurance 
that you will wait on them in a few- 
minutes. 

Above all things, tell the I ruth about 
the goods you are selling as far as you 
know it, and avoid exaggeration. Bj 
over-praising the qualities of the goods 
you are selling to-day, you may be un- 
consciously depreciating the qualities 
of others which you may have to sell 
tO-moiTOW. Do not be too anxious 
to convince your customer of the high 
qualities of one kind of goods or the 
inferior qualities of another kind; you 
can safely leave your customer to find 
out some id' the qualities of the gOOcTs 
he is buying for himself, and some of 
your customers may use some of the 
undigested ideas you may have given 
tin in to your own disadvantage at some 
future lime. 

Credit to New Customers. 

Most of you sell largely on the credit 
system. I would suggest that when a 
new family comes into your neighbor- 
hood and begins to do business with 
you, it would be well to post yourself 
upon their financial standing with the 
dealers in the neighborhood from which 
they have come. Sometimes they will 
al first send a child for a small pur- 
chase, and you can often learn from 
a child at such time what you want 
to know about the family, Ihe father's 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



occupation, etc., bo thai when the i >;i t ■ 
cuts clinic, as they certainly wTll sh 
|y after, and ask you Cor credit, you will 
be in a position to say definitely whe 
ther you can give them credit of not. 
And when you open an account with 
a new customer, make a definite ar- 
rangement as to trims of payment, and 

sec that he lives up to it as far as pos- 
sihle. If on pay day he cannot settle 

the account, give him to understand 

that V' 11 expect him at least to report 
and explain the reason why. 

With regard to the delivers of goods, 
ii is now a common practice on the 

part of the Larger Stores to have from 
two to four deliveries daily at lixed 
hours. Experience has proven this to 
he the very hest method. Your custo- 
mers know the hours of delivery and 
ad accordingly, and you are saved a , 
greal deal of expense ami trouble. 

Watch the Big Advertisers. 

As most of you are not large adver- 
tisers, I would snggesi that you take 
advantage of the advertisements of the 
larger stores. Read them regularly, ami 
whenever you find goods advertised 
that are likely to appeal to your pat- 
rons, bring these goods to the front and 
ticket them at the prices advert ise.T "By 
the large stores. You will be surprised 
at the effect. For instance, a lady, 
just after reading in one of these ad- 
vertisements of 3 pounds of raisins for 

25 cents in a big departmental store, 
walks into your simp; and if she sees 
a ticket on a box of raisins offering 
that at the same price, she is at once 
inspired with confidence in your abil- 
ity to sell not only raisins, but every 
other kind of goods as cheaply as the 
large stores. 

Read the Trade Papers. 

In this connection. 1 would recom- 
mend you to read the trade papers, 
which will give you a knowledge of the 
trade which will enable V0H to, com- 
mand the market and buy goods at 
the right time and of course at the 
right prices. 

Just a word about your dealings with 
your creditors. I>" not return a draft 
because there is some trifling mistake 
in it, perhaps a consignment has been 
short by one package. It will be good 
policy on your part to trust for a few 
dollars the men who 1 rust you for hun- 
dreds, and you will find that you will 
never have any difficulty about hav- 
ing little errors of this kind rectified. 
I'.e careful never to write a cheque 
which there are no funds to meet. 
This is simply ruinous to a merchant's 
credit. These chenues go through the 
clearing house, and within twenty-four 
hours alter they arc written every 
bank in Ottawa knows that a cheque 
of yours has not been honored. Some 
day you may he surprised to find that 
you are refused a little accommodation 
by some bank by reason of this neg- 
lect on your part. 



CANADIAN 

HARDWARE STORES 

No. lO. 



BUSY CALGARY STORE. 
\\c an- glad 1" !"■ aide to -Imw in 

this number another ..I the manj line 
hardware stores in the Canadian .Mid 

die West, that ..I Linton & Hall. Cal 
gary. 

A. 'I'. I. int. hi and E. C. Hall. two 

Campbellford boys joined forces early 

in the kail of '.'Ml.") and opened up I leu 

hardware store in the " \rm I 
Block." Both of these young men being 
practical in every waj ami having the 
advantage of careful training, backed up 
with the other good qualities necessary 

to -pell t he Word ' Success' ' vi/. I 

verance, Energy and Push, their ven- 
ture I'rom the very first day has been a 

most successful one. 



i in of Linton >.V II. ill 
istence. Mi . I [all > i the 

■ c officei a of t he < 'a 
I'm 1 1, pai i im-iit , i Ising from the i ank ■> 

to thl D08itio] of I t of t lie An ial 

Truck Compa des being a mem 

,i othej in the 

town. 

Linton & Mall carrj a stock ol shelf 

and heavy hardware, paint, oil-, Lrla--. 

and ai i- Citj Agents for tin- Gui 
ney Standard Metal Co., of Calgary, be 

i branch of the Qurney Foundrj 
Co., of Toronto, who make the celebrat 
ed "Oxford Chancellor" stoves and 
ranges. Finding then quarters in the 
Armstrong Block limited and the nice- 

sity of moil- loom crowding them out, 
tln\ - . . 1 1 lt 1 1 1 ami found quarters in the 
"Victoria Block" on the Mam Street, 
ii relent iou- building of Albei ta 
sandstone m t he mi . i the city. 

Busine88 expanded with the new move 
and even now there i- no loom to -pale 
Success in any business does not come 
i a ilv it means hard pel work. 

And both these young men ai e woi 




CANADIAN HARDWARE STORES NO. 10— Linton & Hall's Store at Calgary, Alberta. 



Mr. Linton has served with several of 
the foremost hardware houses in On- 
tario, beginning as he did with the old 
pioneer firm <>f C. S. Gillespie, of Camp- 
bellford, Ont. After seven years faith- 
ful work there he went with .1. W. 
Walker, of Belleville. Afterwards with 
John Lewis of the same city and R. R. 
Casement of Madoc, and finally took a 
position with the Marks-( 'lavet-l tobie 
Co., of Port Arthur, remaining therefor 
several years. Hearing so much of Al- 
berta and trusting much to the great 
future of the Middle West as a young 
man's country he came forward at the 
solicitation of Mr. Hall to join him and 
In- in their career as hardware mei 
chants in the growing city of Calgary in 
-limn Alberta. 

Mr. Hall is not a newcomer by any 

means, in fact he may he considered 

something of a pioneer of Calgary. He 

hi' identified with the interests of 

the cit-> eight years ago, and joined the 

staff oi \ McBride & Co.. one of the 
oldest houses in the hardware line in 
Alberta, remaining with them until the 

25 



and they have earned what they pos 

— A good business and a good name in 

the commercial world. 



It'.- tiie man w ho never does anything 
who is always .Iminy-on-t he-spo| when 
it comes to telling how things should 
be done. 



fhe Board of Trade of Minnedosa, 
Man., is at present concentrating its 
efforts on the organization of the Min- 
nedosa I'ower Company, tor the pur- 
pose "f developing available water 
power in the vicinity. The Minnedosa 
Power Company was formed some few 

years ago, but owing to insufficiency of 

capital the charter obtained was never 
utilized until now. when it is the in- 
tention to float the company as speedily 
as possible. With this object in view 

the Board of Trade has issued a pros- 
pectus inviting applications for stock. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 













Sto ves a n d 


Tin w a re 













OVERCOMING STOVE PROBLEMS. 

\ i ange e\ er made lias of 

itself what is railed a draft; that must 
be furnished by the chimney or Hue. 
and even when the draft in chimney or 
tlue is perfect, that is not all that is 
wanted to insure eood work <•! good 
bread or biscuits; the other things nee 
rj being proper setting up. good 
fuel, good material— and last, but not 
a good cook. 1 had a cusl 
- ago, writes V. P. Hans, a Miss- 
ouri hardware salesman, who would 
never guarantee a stove to hake well, 
and when the lady would ask " Why 
won't you guarantee the stove to bake 
well, after saying that you know the 
stove is a good baker ' " his answer 

would be : "I know the stove is a g I 

baker, but 1 do not know if you know 
how to bake or not." And there is a 
lot that hinges on know ins: how. in bak- 
ing as in everything else. 

An old-timer told me that when a 
ladv bought a cheap cook stove the 
chances were that she was going to use 
it h-rself. and if the ton part of the 
oven trot toe hot. would place a paper 
over the bread or biscuit until enough 
ashes had gathered on the top oven 
rdate or if the bottom of the oven got 
too hot. she would put a stove cover 
under the pan. On the other hand, when 
a ladv bought a high-priced stove the 
chances were she would have a servant 
to run it. and if breakfast was late be- 
cause she bad been late in getting up to 
start the fire, her excuse would be that 
the stove would not draw. Tf. on the 
othpr hand, she cot the oven too hot, 
or forgot to take out the bread or bis- 
cuit in time and they were burnt, the 
excuse would be the stove could not be 
reerulated and at times T have found 
these excuses used under conditions men- 
tioned. 

Unreasonable Guarantees. 

in makine a sale, do not make 
an'- unreasonable guarantees or prom- 
ises- do not sav this stove or ranee, as 
the case mav be. will do eood work set 
no to anv kind of an old chimney and 
with anv kind of fuel: because vou know- 
it will not. no matter what may be its 
name or who mav be its maker. To ob- 
tain the best results there is needed a 
p-ood flue or eh'mnev. proner setting- ur> 
with nine full size of collar on the stove 
or ranee and eood fuel, and as stated 
before, a good cook to run it. 

When possible, the dealer should set 
up evrv stove or ranee he sells and the 
man doin"- this work should not Vie the 
cub or tV- no .,i'L-iu'oi about the 

nbiee r,r shoii. Tie -hould know enoii"Tl 

about the bnsiness to know if th° flue 

he is o-oino' to ii w has a eood draft or 

not -houbl bo tell 'he nartv buying the 

or ranfc and if OOSSiMe correct 

Hifl trouble before leaving the iob Tf 

this were alwavs done there would be 

' kicks afterwards. 

\Vti"n the stove or ranee eoes into the 

country where a man cannot well be 



sent to sel it up. instinct them as far 
as possible h"\\ tn set it up and what 
faults t<> avoid. Many of the manufac- 
turers have 1 Wets "i circulars on 

this subject that thev would be elad to 
furnish if they knew they would be 
used 

\ good chimnej should lie 8 i 8 inches 
inside, and the top of it should be a 
little higher than the highest pari of the 
comb of the house, and should not have 
a tree overhanging the chimney, as is 
sometimes the case, and Hue should end 
from I to 6 inches below the opening in- 
to which the stove pipe runs, and should 
not run down to the door or into the 
cellar where, perhaps there is an open- 
ing into said flue without a cover or 
stopper of any kind; and remember put- 
tine up two or three stoves to one flue 
is like hitching up two or three wagons 
to a single team just large enough to 
handle one wagon easily. 

Always Will Be Complaints. 

I suppose as long as stoves and rang- 
es are sold there will at times be com- 
plaints made and when they come in 
thev should be looked after at once, and 
it is well to go yourself or send a man 
who knows the business. The first thing 
I do in such cases is to fire up the stove 
or range to see for myself how it 
burns. 

Tf vou find the fire does not burn well, 
examine the flue and see that, it has a 
good draft. If not, locate the trouble 
and remedy it if possible, because a 
good draft is absolutely necessary to 
eood work. Next, look to the fuel and 
remember vou cannot get a hot fire from 
wet or rotten wood, as the beat used in 
evaporating the water in green or wet 
wood is lost to the oven; nor can vou 
get a hot fire from poor coal, especially 
when mixed with dirt. Then see that 
the ashes are kept away from the bot- 
tom of the fire and from under the grate 
allowing the air to pass freely through 
the fuel, as air is as necessary to a fire 
as is the wood or coal, and a fire can 
no more burn without anv air than you 
can live without air. All air enterine 
into the fire box should pass under and 
through the fuel, as any air that pass- 
es over the fire checks it and at the 
same time cools the oven, so T would 
sav alwavs keen the damner slide in 
<he front door closed, and it would be 
better fin my oninion) if no damper 
slide was put in the front fire box. 

Fire Box Needs Air. 

Get all the air necessary into the fire 
box hv drawine out the hearth slide, as 
in doine so the air is nut to the bot- 
tom .if the fire where it belones. But 
while air is necessary to combustion, 
like in evervthine else, there mav be too 
much of a eood thin"-. Onlv one-fourth 
of the air entering the fire box is oxv- 
een. the onlv thine that counts, while 
the other three-fourths is made tin of 
neutral jrnses th ■•< '■(!"< i -TV. n + e nothine 
towards combustion, but have to be 

21 



heated at the expense of the oven; so 
that while it is accessary to admit all 
the air into the lire bo\ that is needed 
to make the lire burn well, no more 
than is necessary should be admitted to 
keep the lire burning well. And as no 
two lines draw exactly alike, nor the 
same Hue thaws alike c\er\ day, but 
change as does the weather, the amount 
of air to be admitted to do the best 
work can only be learned bj experience, 
as an\ good conk will tell you, and that 
is why an oven will gel hotter one day 
than another, using the same kind and 
same amount .if fuel. 



HELPS FOR FURNACE MEN. 

For years I have set furnaces and in 
consequence have many customers who 
need a little instruction every fall to 
get their heaters operating satisfact- 
orily, writes an American furnace, man. 
They change servants and those who 
are familiar with the proner manage 
ment are no longer available. The gen 
era! and specific charge is that the 
heater doesn't, heat. Frequently we 
find that the cold air box has the dam- 
per shoved in to the fullest extent, mak- 
ing it impossible for the heater to sup- 
ply the different pipes connected with it. 
Not infrequently some change in the 
immediate neighborhood of the cold air 
inlet affects the air supply, sometimes 
producing an eddying current, creating 
a vacuum where there should be a press 
ure. Often when dampers are put in 
the hot air pipe at the furnace they 
may be closed off and it needs a man 
from mv shop to go to the house and 
open the damper Frequently in ex- 
tremely cold weather we are told that 
even with a eood fire the heater fails 
to do its duty. An investigation finds 
that the ashpit is banked with ashes 
and the firepot is more than half full of 
ashes with a fair fire on the surface, 
leaving the impression with the house 
owner, who may go down into the cel- 
lar and look in the feed door, that there 
is a good fire. Here, however, investi- 
gation stops. When a $3.50 a dav tin- 
smith or furnaceman spends about an 
hour removing ashes from the ashpit 
clearing the ashes out of the fire and 
getting a good fire started it is both 
expensive and vexing, vet T have to 
make out such bills frequently. Fre- 
quently people, have automatic draft 
regulators attached to the smoke pipe 
and through a misunderstanding of 
their one and operation Ihoy binder 
rather than help conditions. After thev 
are once set going properlv and some 
member of the household thoroughly 
understands there is no further com 
plaint, and these automatic devices give 
quite general satisfaction. In fact, in 
many instances their sale has been both 
a source of profit to me and of comfort 
to the owners in keeping up a more 
regular fire. Too much draft or too 
much air supply are never the cause of 
any trouble to me. T can regulate them. 
Rut a lack of either will make trouble 
for anv furnaceman Then every little 
cause of friction must be removed to 
help the flow of smoke or air. 



The "■enu'lie i«>\s 'f life are to be 
gotten froj.i uspfni effort, and to hunt 
for pleasure is in lose it. T)o vour work 
•Mid pleasure will come to you. 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



RETAIL HARDWARE ASSOCIATION NEWS 



Official news of the Ontario and Western Canada Associations will bo published In this department, 
donee regarding association matters should be sent to the secretaries. If for 
publication send to the Editor of Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 



All correspon 



ONTARIO EXECUTIVE MEETS. 

The Executive Committee of the 
t ari<i Retail Hardware Association held 
an important meeting in Toronto on 
Monday, Dec. 31st, when arrangements 
made Eoi th< coming March Con- 
vent ion, and action t aken on \ a - 

matters before the Association. 

Correspondence was read from Jenk 
ins & Hardy, representing the Canadian 
Wholesale Hardware Association, and 
the Sheet Metalware Association in 
reference to the cartage charges ques- 
tion, ilif resolution passed at the Sep 
tember Convention recommending that 
where jobbers sell to persons' outside 
the trade that they protect the retail 
eis. and in reference to the resolution 
that enamel ware manufacturers mark 
all seconds as such in plain letters. 
Letters were read from Secret ary .Mc- 
Robie of the Western Canada Retail 
Hardware Association in reference to 
enamelware price-cutting by depart- 
mental stores, and -other -matters. An 
interesting communication was also 
read from Secretary Trowern of the 
Retail Merchants' Association in re- 
ply to a letter advising him of the ac- 
tion being taken by the Retail Hard- 
ware Association in the matter of op- 
posing the Parcels Post CO. I). Collec- 
tion System. Secretary Trowern 
agreed that all merchants should co- 
operate in combating; the proposed leg- 
islation, and stated that his Associa- 
tion was also opposing other legisla- 
tion, which they would he glad to have 
the co-operation of the Hardware Asso- 
ciation in combating. 

Good Friday Chosen. 

It was decided that the date of the 
annual convention in March would be 
changed from Tuesday, March I2th, to 
Thursday and Friday, March 28th and 
29th, the latter date being Good Fri- 
day when single fares would be avail- 
able on ail railroads. The opening 
meeting will be on Thursday afternoon, 
and on Thursday a banquet will be 
tendered the members of the Associa- 
tion by Col. MacLean, publisher of 
Hardware and Metal. A very interest- 
ing programme will be arranged for 
Friday morning, afternoon and even- 
ing ; a "question box" being establish- 
ed in which questions of interest to the 
trade may be asked by any dealer and 
replied to and discussed by any others 
present. 

The Executive decided to send a let- 
ter to the Railway Commission draw- 
ing attention to the unjust conditions 
existing in connection with the cartage 
charges imposed on retail hardware 
merchants, by an arrangement between 
the jobbing houses, the railway and the 
cartage companies. The Executive will 
ask the Railway Commission to elimi 
nate the existing evil, having failed to 
secure satisfactory action after pro- 
tecting against the charges to the 
Wholesale Hardware Association. 

The Parcels Post question was dis- 



cussed at considerable length, and it 

was decided that, a draft letter woidd 

be prepared to be published in Hard 

ware and .Metal, and that everj hard 
ware merchant in Canada be requested 
t . i copy t he let ter on his lettei he. id. and 
forward copies to the Post Vlastei Gen 
eral and his local member ..I I'ailia 
ment. mailing the letter-. 30 they will 
reach Ottawa on Feb. 1st next. It was 
also resoh <-i\ that the A-s< icial i< m 

views with disfavor the proposed legis 

latum, and that the Executive cooper 
ate with other organizations in secur 
ing its defeat. Prank Taylor, of Carle 

ton Place, was appointed to represent 
the Association if it is found necessary 
to send a delegation to Ottawa to op 
pose the measure. 

The Secretary reported that new 

members were already being enrolled 

for ]/)07, and many of the old members 
had forwarded their membership lees 
for the coming year. It was decided 
that an active campaign would be con- 
ducted in order to increase the mem- 
bership loll to 300 members if possible, 
before the March Convention. 

Provincial Legislation. 

The resolution adopted last May that 
the "Association petition the Ontario 
Legislature to so amend the statute 
law and abolish the exemptions in Sec- 
tion 180 of the Division Court Act, so 
far as to make small accounts up to 
$5.00 collectable by garnishment by a 
procedure in the magistrate's court sim 
ilar to that for collection of claims for 
wages, the prosecutor to serve the 
summons in the case without charge," 
was discussed and it was decided that 
the matter would be brought to the at- 
tention of the Attorney-General, and 
each dealer in Ontario requested to urge 
his local member of the Legislature, to 
support the proposed amendment. 

Complaints were received of jobbers 
selling direct to persons outside the 
trade at wholesale prices, and the Sec- 
retary was instructed to take the mat- 
ter up with the representatives of the 
Wholesale Hardware Association. Two 
cases discussed were those of jobbers 
selling cutlery to a School Hoard at 
the same price quoted a retail dealer 
and of jobbers selling skates to young 
mail order advertisers who have no 
regular place of business, but who ad- 
vertise in the daily papers in Strat- 
ford, Chatham and other centres, offer- 
ins - to supply skates, etc., at prices 
which the local trade would be unable 
to meet. It was felt that jobbers 
should protect the retail dealers who 
are their customers in these places, 
from the competition of those who are 
under no expense in keeping up places 
of business. 

Better Freight Classification. 
The question of freight classification 

and it was decided that a representative 
was explained at considerable length 
of tin' Executive would meet the rail 

27 



road freight officials and endeavor to 
imI t i-i cla ion of hard 

i i( le 'i lii mat '■■< « ill l" 

ported on at t he March ( ouv eul ion 
As the Western Canad nl I laid 

i ion will hold rinu&l 

il' in l''ebi uai > t he Execul iv ■ 
cided to recommend to thai bodj thai 
a temporal , Dominion Retail Hardware 
iciat urn be formed to be • 

of the Presidents and Seci i] the 

two existing Association,, until a 
manent organization is elTected. 

Mutual Fire Insurance. 

J. Walton Peart, ol St. Mary's, 
Chairman ol the Mutual Insurance Com 
mittee reported that satisiactorv re 
plies had been received from a fan per 
centage of the members, and he 

mated that at Least, one million do] 

lars worth of insurance would be placed 
with the Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany if one was organized bj the ! 
ciation. Steps are being taken to pro 
cure legal advice as to expense of or 
ganizing a company, and several old 
line companies are also being asked to 
quote a rate at which they will accept 
lire insurance to the amount of at least. 
one million dollars, if placed with them 
by the Ontario Hardware Merchants, 
through the Association. 

The Question Box. 

At luncheon, when the members of 
the Executive were entertained bj 
retarj Wrigley, some very valuable 
points were brought out in the "round 
table" discussion, several members sav 
ing the pointers received were worth the 
i pense of a trip to Toronto. All ag 
that there was no more valuable feature 
of trade associations than the opportun- 
ity convention gatherings gave to mem- 
bers to exchange ideas with men in 
their own line of trade who are not 
nearby competitors. Consequently the 
"Question BoX" feature will lie made 
important at the .March Conventioi 

At luncheon on Monday the fol- 
lowing questions were suggested: 

"Does it pay a dealer doing a $50,- 
000 business to go behind the count xf 

"Is Christmas trade in specialties 
worth going after ?" 

"Is it wise to transfer a customci 
from one clerk to anot her .'" 

"Is a parcel boj at 50 cents per day 
cheaper than one at $li per day'" 

"Does it pay to advertise— and how.'" 

"Should a poii ion of a clerk's salary 
be withheld in ordei t" ensure steady 
sen ice'" 

"Can the shortage of tinsmiths 
relieved better by employing help' 

The "Question Box" makes a good 
target for keen thinkers. Who can hit 

the bull's eve first .' 



An follows in the wake of commerce, 
for without commerce there is neither 

snplus wealth nor leisure. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware- Metal 



ttt.ll)' >"(d 



1888 



Th« MacLean Publishing Co. 



Limited 



JOHy flir.VE MACLEAN 



President 



Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in 
the Provinces of British Columbia. Alberta, Saskat- 
chewan. Manitoba, Ontario. Quebec. Nova Scotia. 
New Brunswick. P.F.. Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal. 
Toronto. 
Winnipbo, 
London, Eno. 

Chicago, Ii l.. 



OFFICES : 

232 McGill Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 

511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3726 

88 Fleet Street. E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim 

Telephone, Central 12960 

BRANCHES : 

1 1 m ■ i Teutonic Bldg. 
J. Roland Kay 
St John N.B. - - - No. 7 Market Wharf 

Vancouver, B.C. - - - Geo. S. B. Perry 

Parii Francb - Agence Havas, 8 Place de la Bourse 
Manchester. Eno. - - - 92 Market Street 

Zirich. Switzerland - - - Louis \\ olt 

Orell Fussli & Co. 

Subscription. Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. 6d., elsewhere - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

_ , , ... ( Adscript, London 

Cable Address | Adscript, Canada 



FIGHTING MAIL ORDER HOUSES. 

In Canada the first skirmish in the 
fight between the mail order houses and 
the retail trade is now being fought 
over the proposed parcels post C.O.D. 
collections system and success seems as- 
sured to the retailers if they continue 
the campaign in the energetic way it 
has been taken up by the Retail Hard- 
ware Association, the dry goods dealers, 
and others Interested. 

In the United State., however, tire 
fight has been on for some years and 
the mail order houses have succeeded in 
getting rural mail delivery established 
in many States. The rural carriers are 
allowed to. carry private mail matter 
from mail order houses but proposals 
to still further extend these privileges 
have so far been defeated by the joint 
furht put up by the hardware and other 
retail associations. .More particulars of 
these fights will be given in future is- 
sues. 

This week we done to draw attention 
to a proposal recently made that the 
retail hardware trade fight the mail 
order houses with their own weapons— 
a trade catalogue fol distribution 
amongst the farmers and other consum- 
The National Hardware Bulletin, 
organ of the National Retail Hardware 
elation, has been securing the opin- 
ions of manufacturer-, jobbers and re- 
tailers on the proposition and a result 
of the replies received has laid it down 
as an accepted fact that a catalogue 
would be a good thing ii gotten up on 
right lines as wherever catalogues have 
been used by dealers they have proved 



cess, The opinions expressed are 
stronglj against a priced catalogue as 
price.- varj in different sections and even 
dealers in the same district have not 
uniform prices, Another strong argu- 
ment is that uniform nrices maintained 

h\ a majority oi the Hade would justi- 
fj an outcrj against a "hardware 
i rust." The Bulletin, in discussing the 

matter, deduces that -uch a catalogue 
cannot be priced, dr if priced, the quo 
tations cannot be uniform. It further 
sas - : 

"Another dlfficultv presents itself. All 
dealers do not earrj the same goods. 
A dealer in Nebraska has quarreled 
with one of the saw manufacturers. 
Must he perforce advertise that manu- 
facturer's saw ' Must he advertise it, 
when he does not carry the line and 
would not send away for a sample even 
to supply an obstinate customer's de- 
mand .' 

"It may be asked why each dealer 
>hould not proceed to issue a special 
catalogue of his own, with local color, 
showing the lines he is anxious to push. 
There are two reasons : First, individ- 
ual catalogues will prove more expens- 
ive than when issued by the million. 
Second, all dealers are not trained in 
the matter of compiling catalogues nor 
can they afford to hire a man specially 
for that purpose. Summarized, the sit- 
uation is as follows : 

"Each dealer 5 should issue some form 
of catalogue, annually or semi-annually, 
to people of his community with profit, 
but the catalogue cannot be priced uni- 
formly, a uniform line of goods cannot 
be shown, and the work cannot be done 
by each individual dealer. 

"It has been suggested that the Na- 
tional association take up the matter, 
getting out an individual catalogue for 
each favorable member. The expense 
would be minimized by using regulation 
plates, showing lines each dealer carri- 
ed and no others. A few pages would 
be devoted to local matter. The local 
matter would individualize each cata- 
logue. There would be a country road 
mai>, a cut of the principal local build- 
ings, a sketch of the 'oldest inhabitant' 
and the most popular or successful citi- 
zen. 

"This catalogue would be as the local 
dealer wanted it. It would be priced or 
unpriced as he pleased. It would show 
no goods he did not carry. Tt would 
push no «coods he wished to hide. It 

would cost no more than a general, uni- 
form catalogue, because it would not 
show so many lines. 

"There is one good reason why the 
National association could not do this. 
There might be a conflict between two 
members in the same town. Both might 
want the catalogue service exclusively. 
28 



The association could not show favorit- 
ism. This object ion might lie eliminat 
ed in some way. The matter oujrht to 
In- taken up In some private interest." 



KEEPING SALESMEN WAITING. 

A St. Paul traveling man recently 
stated that a good buyer never keeps 
B salesman waiting if it is possible not 
in. and yet it is true that every sales- 
man losses on an average of two and" a 
half hours each day waiting on buyers. 
The cost of selling goods is figured in 
making the selling price and buyer s have 
to pay for it, so that if a salesman's 
time is lost some one has to stand the 
loss, and although most buyers would 
be very much surprised to hear that 
they pay for it, it is nevertheless true. 
There are over 100,000 salesmen on the 
road, whose salary and expense aver- 
age $10 per day, and their lost time is 
therefore valued at least at $250,000 a 
day, which enormous sum must he paid 
by the buyers, although they get ab- 
solutely nothing for it. 



KNOCK OFF THE PACKAGE DUTY. 

The Government should remove the 
duty on packages re-imposed under the 
new tariff. What is the use of it ? The 
excuse- that it was imposed because a 
few importers connived with the ship- 
pers, a very remote and impregnant 
possibility. If they would do this to 
secure a proportion of their goods free 
entry, they would do it to secure the 
same proportion entry at a lower rate 
of duty. The excuse is a poor one. 
The duty protects no one and produces 
no revenue to speak of, but it is a pos- 
itive nuisance to the trade and a hin- 
derance to business. 



KILL THE THING. 

Have you sent a postcard to youi 
representative in Parliament asking 
him to oppose the proposed extension 
of the parcel post system to assist the 
big mail order houses ? If you haven't 
do so to-day. It is in the interest of 
every ordinary retailer 'hat. Ill's scheme 
be killed. What is even more impor- 
tant it is in the interest of the whole 
country. Tendency to centre trade in 
the big cities is not in keeping witli 
I lie successful development of Canada 
as a nation. A thousand prosperous 
retailers scattered throughout the coun- 
try constitute a much greater national 
asset than a single huge institution in 
some city and they will better serve 
the needs of the people. 



Hardware and Metal 



KDITORI AL 



PROSPERITY AT FLOOD TIDE 



A year ago it was though! that the 
/.( mill of prosperity bad been reaehed, 
l>uL ii has n"t taken twelve months to 
piove that this latter new wag incor- 
rect, says Brads'treets of Dec. 20, in a 
review of Canadian trade conditions. 
This, year, with a steady growth in pop- 
ulation and an increasing trade and 
commerce in all directions at borne and 
abroad, a still greater share bf pros- 
perity has fallen to [ho lot bf all classes 
oi' (his country's inhabitants. 

The farmers of Canada have had a 

splendid year, the country's mines have 
produced metals ami coal as never be- 
fore, and the output of products of the 

forest and of the sea compares favor- 
ably with thai id' the previous years. 
The production id' wheat and other 
grains has been the heaviest in the his- 
tory of the country. The wheat crop 
will show an increase of about Id per 
cent., for the larger part of which wes- 
tern Canada is responsible. Last year's 
western wheat crop was- in the neigh- 
borhood of 85,000,000 bushels, while 
this year it will run something over 
90,000,000 bushels. 

One of the most satisfactory features 
Of Canadian trade is that of foreign 
business. Owing to the fact, that gov- 
ernment reports are not issued until 
four or live months after the date re- 
ported on, it is impossible to obtain fig- 
ures covering the latter part, of the 
year, but the report for the fiscal year, 
which extended half way jmto L9G!6, 
gives a very good indication as to how 
trade moved, particularly as it is well 
known that trade in the latter part of 
this year showed no signs of falling off. 
The total for the fiscal year was by far 
the heaviest in the country's history, 
amounting to $546,929,038, being an 
increase of $80,610,012 over that of the 
previous year. It was in export trade 
that the increase was greatest. The, 
value of the year's exports showed an 
increase of $44,184,741, the greatest in 
the history of the country, while the 
imports increased by $.'51,046,686. Agri- 
cultural exports increased by almost 
50 per cent, and those of manufactures 
by about '20 per cent. To (ircat Bri- 
tain. Canada exported 53.96 per cent. 
of her total exports, against 50.6] last 
year, and to the United States, .'{•">. 08 
per cent., against 37.51. 

The Golden West. 

Canada's present prosperity is large 
lv due to the rapid growth or the wes- 
tern country, the enrichment of wes- 
tern farmers by the high prices for a 
greater volume of product, and the 
rapid filling of the country by immi- 
gration. Its population has been in- 
creased during the past year by well 
over 100,000 immigrants from (ircat 
Britain, the United States and the con- 
tinent of Europe. The major portion 
of these have taken up land in the west. 
and others in the new portions of eas- 
tern Canada, but it is in the west that 
i his immigration has most affected the 



(■"iiiii r\ 's advance. Tin- Brit bsfa and 

American immigration has set a :>i\ 

high average oi quality for that of the 
whole year. The western cattle trade 
had an exceedingly g I year; the cat- 
tle were well finished, and shipment* 
were nearlj 50 per cent, greater than 
those of last year. Prices, too, were 

fairly good. The grain movement was 
slow ow in- to Hie inability of i be rail 
roads to proper!} handle it- Al coun- 
try points, however, il was marketed ear- 
ly, and this had a very good effect 
upon collections throughout the coun- 
try, which averaged better this year 

than (hey have done for some time. The 

growth of the manufacturing interests 

of the west is year by \ear b C tning 
nunc pronounced. Winnipeg, among 
the newer cities, is fast becoming a 
manufacturing centre, having made con- 
siderable progress in this regard dur- 
ing the past year; i( is also showing 
steady growth as a jobbing centre. 

Pacific Coast Revival. 

The revival in the lumbering and min- 
ing industries along the Pacific coast 

made the year the most remarkable in 
the history of that part, of the country. 
The lumber mills, particularly, have 
been unable to keep up with demands 
even at the high juices ruling, and sim- 
ilar conditions prevail at the mines. 
The shortage in labor on the coast has 
been a serious problem. Its cost has 
advanced greatly, and inferior Asiatic 
labor has had to be resorted to. The 
growing of fruit is rapidly becoming 
an important industry, and a good Eur- 
opean trade is hoped for Tn"this con- 
nection. The shipping trade has shown 
a good growth as a result' of rapidly 
increasing trade with the Orient. The 
crops of Alberta naturally find their 
outlet on the Pacific Ocean, and flour and 
grain markets are rapidly being opened 
in Japan and parts of Africa. Whole- 
sale and retail trade has been good 
throughout the year and money has been 
plentiful. 

| Conditions in Ontario. 

Generally speaking, conditions in On- 
tario and the other older parts of the 
country have been but little different 
from those prevailing farther \\«st. 
Crops generally were good. Fall wheat 
and most other grains, with the excep- 
tion of spring- wheat, showed an in- 
creased total yield. Prices have been 
good ever since the harvest, and the 
grain has come forward fairly well. Rut 
it was in other lines that farmers were 
most successful. The dairy season has 
been an extraordinary one in more than 
fine respect. While the make of cheese 
was nol so heavy as in previous seasons, 
the high prices prevailing eclipsed any- 
thing in the record of the industry. The 
result was a heavy make of cheese and 
a light make of butter, in which also 
prices were high. While cattle prices 
were not generally good, those for hogs 
were exceedingly high, and not nearly 

29 



enOUgfa I unable. The packing 

industry Buffered on this account, i 

era! wholesale trade has hail on, of the 

successful years. The turnover in 
most lines has been the ln;i \ n>i on re- 
cord. The great activitj in railr I 

and genera] building In all part- of the 
country has resulted in a icarcif 
manufactured steel and iron. Manu- 
facturers have suffered severely in the 
hortage of labor, and serious delays 
in making deliveries hai e oceui 

Canadian banks have bad a good 
year, as shown by annual statements 
now being published. The on,, failure, 

thai of (he Ontario Hank, was (he re- 
sult of bad management and not oi 
era! conditions. 

Railway Development. 

'flu- scarcity oi labor has had - 
effect upon the work of railwa; 
tension. The new Grand Trunk Pacific 
line is being pushed with all possible 
speed, and all available men have been 
working on different parts of it through- 
out the season. The Canadian Nojr- 
(hern, which will be Canada's third 

transcontinental line, is rapidly b 

pushed through the west. The same 
company has completed its line from 
Toronto north to Sudbury. The On- 
tario government railway running up 
into New Ontario has also advanced 
further during the year. It is rapidly 
making, tributary to Toronto and other 
Ontario business centres, a vast area 
of lands fabulously rich in products 
of mines and forests. It is along (his 
line the silver mines of Cobalt lie. 
Where a year ago (here was along this 
line only an occasional lumber or pros- 
pecting camp, there are (owns and set- 
tlements, the existence of which signi- 
fies much to older Canada. What the 
opening of this new country will mean 
may be gathered from the fact that ship- 
ments of ore already run to about 
000,000 a month. This railroad is also 
opening up a vast agricultural country 
well fitted for settlement. 

During the past year a good number 
of settlers have gone into the country, 
but here is a land extending up t<< 
James Bay which will need filling 
long after western Canada has ceased 
to be the Mecca of immigrants. It is 
reasonable to expect its development 

will do for the industries of eastern 
and central Canada just what the wes- 
tern expansion is now doing for the 
country as a whole. 



FREIGHT RATES TOO HIGH. 
The stove manufacturers of Canada 
arc not satisfied with the new classifies 
tion made respecting stoves in the re 
cently revised freight rate- submitted 
1>\ the Canadian Freight Agents' Asso 
ciation. The matter will be again 
discussed by the Freight Association. 
which committed to much 

h.uer tariffs than formerly. 



Don't worry over trifles. If you must 
worry, pick out something worth while, 
then get busy. 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



Har dware Trade Gossip 



Ontario. 

\ , k. hardware merch 

Lefroj . eallSa on Toronl Rsl 

week. 
H k. Carter, hardware merchant, 
sold out his business to 
Davis & Co. 

Rraker, of Prakei >x Son, bard- 
ruerchants, Brampton, called on 
the jobbers in Toronto thi- week. 

Cyrus Birge of the Canadian Screw 

Company, Hamilton, was a visitor in 

onto, on Thursdaj of last week. 

\\. U. White, of Brandon, Man., vyas 

a visitor in Toronto this week, calling 

on the wholesale hardware merchants. 

\\m. Harland, oi Harland Bros., hard- 
ware merchants, Clinton, was a visitor 
in Toronto last week calling on the 
wholesale hardware merchants 

Mr. Ballantync, of the Sherwrh-Wttl- 
iams paint staff in Toronto, was on a 
visit to the Ue.ad office, Montreal, for 
ral days list week. 
The Kellev Hardware Companj sufi- 
l loss by'fire on Dee. 2i . Their stock 
which was valued at $40,000 was de- 
stroyed, but partly covered by insur- 
ance. 
Max Morrell has started at his new 
sition as sales manager for Rice Lew- 
- & - in, W. R. Tait succeeding him 
a- Toronto representative tor Lewis 
Hie-.. Montreal. 

.1. R. Mar low, who has been manag- 
ing the transportation branch of the C. 
MA., has resigned, to take charge of 
the sale- department of the Canada Cy- 
cle and Motor Company: 

John Harold, manager of the Paris 

Plow Company was presented with a 

d-headed cane by the employees last 

turday evening, as a mark of their 

m towards the manager. 

The Canadian Iron & Foundry Co. 

presented each of its 158 Hamilton em- 

idoyees with a fine Christmas turkey. 

The company did the same for all its 

employees at six other plant-. 

Charlie Boyd, manager of the Hard- 
ware .-tore oi the Ybunge Estate, , Irav- 
jnhurst, was a visitor in Toronto sev- 
t his week calling on the 
wholesale hardware merchai il 

'i 5. Hunter, the newly established 
lardware merchant. Durham, with his 
manager, W. Coleman, was in Toronto 
ill last week at Rice Lewis & Son, 
lurchasing their Btock, which amounted 

■ ■"■ 

W. H. tiumball, hardware merchant, 
jf South Woodslee, has sold his busi- 
- and property. Met I bbinghaus 

md A. Rumball, having purchased the 
ck of hardware and furniture, and 
,vill continue the business in tie 
-tand. 

Thomas Chamberlain of the Buck 
Stove Co., Brantford, had a pleasant 
k Monday afternoon. He presented 
each of the men under his supervis- 
on a handsome -ilk handkerchief to 
mow hi- appreciation of their work and 
/•-.d feeling towards them. 



Adam Taylor, of the Taylor Forbes 
Company, Guelph, has been elected one 

of the fliiAlph directors of the Coiuinei 

cial Travelers' Association of Canada 

and Arthur F. Hatch ot tin- Canada 

Steel l ■ 1- * ' i fipanj . I lamilton. a 

member of the Hamilton Hoard. 

Sir Mackenzie Howell was showing 
some visitors around the premises of 
the Belleville Hardware Company, at 

Belleville, of which he is president, when 
he narrow lv escaped possiblj fatal in- 
juries by being Struck bj an elevator 
of the descent of which he was oul\ 
ant just in time. He was stand- 
ing directly under it. 

Alex. Payne, who for some years 
ha- been employed on the sample floor 
for II. S. Ilowland Sons & Co., of To- 
ronto, has been appointed to the trav 
cling staff, by taking -Jack Anderson's 
place in the Niagara Peninsula. He 
will no doubt meet with every success, 
as he is perfectly conversant with 
every branch of the business. 

Sir \Y. P. Ilowland, who died New 
Year's morning in Toronto, was a bro- 
ther of the late IL S. Rowland and 
uncle of Peleg Ilowland, president of 
II. S. Rowland & Sons, and George W. 
[lowland of the Graham Nail Works, 
Toronto. Sir William Rowland's life 
was interwoven in the history of Can- 
ada, he having been a "Father of Con- 
federation," and intimately connected 
with the early development of Western 
Canada. 

Charles Kerr, a 16-year-old Wood- 
stock boy, met with a serious accident 
a fortnight ago. He was working for 
Whitney Bros., tinsmiths, and was as- 
sisting in the loading of a boiler on a 
sleigh at the station. The boiler was 
successfully placed in position, and Kerr 
stood behind to hold it on. When the 
sleigh started the boiler slipped, kno( k- 
ing lCerr to the ground, and the boiler 
fell across the boy. Three ringers were 
severed, and his back was injured, i ut 
not broken.- 

Quebec. 

William Gravel, of Terrebonne, Que., 
wa- in Montreal last week. 

D. Ruette, of St. Hyacinthe, was in 
Montreal purchasing supplies. 

C. Williscraft of Smiths Falls, was a 
visitor in Montreal last week. 

F. Lilian, of St. Therese, Que., was 
in Montreal buying general goods. 

W. H. Evans of the Canada Paint 
Co., Montreal, spent New Year's Day 
in Ottawa. 

Edgar G. Powell has left for Winni- 
peg, to represent the J. W. Harris Co., 
Montreal. 

I. J. Kirouack, of Qptoh, Que., call c d 
at some of the Montreal wholesale 
houses last week. 

II. W. Aird. of the Canada Paint Co., 
Montreal, Who has been sick for some 
time, has recovered. 

Finest Bureau, of the t raveling staff 

of Lewis Bros., spent a feu days in 

New York a- the guest of hi- Inother- 
in-law. 

30 



Edgar W. Wilkinson, of Harrison 
Bros, and Howson, cutlery manufactur 
ers, wa- a visitor at the Montreal oi 
fice of Hardware and Metal yesterday. 

C. C. Ballantyne. manager of Sher 

win Williams Co., Montreal, h s taken 
up his duties at the Harbor Hoard, as 
one of the three new harlioi officials. 

F. W. Bronton, Winnipeg, formerly 

representing the Stewart Manufacturing 
Co. of Woodstock, Out., has joined the 
traveling stall' of F. W. Lamplough & 

( 'o. lie will travel from coast t:, coast . 
At an early hour Thursday morn- 
ing, .lan. ::, [907, a disastrous fjre 

cleaned up the best part of a block ol 
Montreal business houses. Anion- I he 
sufferers were the Montreal factory of 
the Gillette Safety Razor Co., the 'Bea- 
ver Rubber Clothing Co., the Otis 
Pensom Elevator Co., and the Dodge 
Manufacturing Co. of Toronto. 

Western. 

Hums Bros., hardware merchants, 
Kawende, Man., will move their slock 
of hardware, etc., (o Portage La Prairie, 
where they will carry on business. 

R. P. McLennan, of McLennan, Me 
Feely & Co., Vancouver, has been nom- 
inated as one of the Liberal candidates 
for Vancouver city in the coming B. C. 
elections. 

McKinleys' hardware store of Ninga, 
Man., was destroyed by fire last week, 
damage amounting to $7,000 on stock 
and $3,000 on building, partly covered 
by insurance. 

Joseph Cahill, one of the oldest com- 
mercial travellers in the West, a repre- 
sentative of the Ashdown Hardware 
Company, died of pneumonia on Janu- 
ary 2, in Winnipeg. The body was sent 
to his former home in Peterboro', lor 
burial. 

Smith & Ferguson, hardware mer- 
chants of Regina, Sask., have sold their 
business to Heart Bros., of that place, 
who control the Western Hardware Com- 
pany, which will mean an amalgamation 
of these two powerful business houses. 
The price paid for the business was in 
the neighborhood of $125,000 for the 
business and property. J. W. Smith, 
proprietor of the Smith & Ferguson 
business, will continue in the coal busi- 
ness. 

Maritime Provinces. 

G. L. Munroe, hardware dealer, was 
a heavy loser in the recent (ire at Lon- 
donderry, N.S., having only $1,000 in- 
surance. 

S. S. Wetmore, travelling represen- 
tative for A. M. Bell & Company, Hali- 
fax, is recovering from a serious attack 
ol' influenza. 

M. F. Irwin, St. John, N.B., repre- 
sentative of the MeClary Manufactur- 
ing Company, London, spent the Xmas 
holidays al London. His family will lo- 
cate at St. John in January. 

L. L. Libby, Halifax, manager of I he 
Canadian Rubber Company, spent the 
Christmas holidays at his old home at 
Portland, Maine. Before leaving, the 
staff gave him a Christmas present in 

i in' lorin of a fine travelling bag. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






Markets and Market Notes 

(For detailed prices see Ourrent Market Quotations, page 70.) 



THE WEEK'S MARKETS IN BRIEF. 

TORONTO. 
Lock Sets— Now 37'- and 10 percent. 

Hinges — Light and Heavy tee and strap, 
advancing; also, wrought butts now 70 
per cent.; crate hinges and back flaps, 65 
and 5 per cent.; hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

Building Paper- E2, D2 and Surprise. 

Stanley Tools— 20 per cent, advance. 

Bar Iron -Advanced to $2.30. 

Galvanized 8heets— Appollo advanced 10c. 

Boiler Tubes — Advances on some sizes. 

Compression and Fuller Work — Lower 
discounts. 



Montreal Hardware Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 4, 1907. 

The holidays are past and business 
lias again assumed its usual state. 

Jobbers claim that prospects are ex- 
ceedingly bright for the first three or 
six months of the year at least. 

Prices are still going steadily up. 

Sockets firmer, chisels and prune 
knives have advanced about 10 per cent. 

Peterboro and Gurney. locks have also 
advanced, the new discount being 37£ 
and 10 per cent, instead of 45 and 10 
per cent. 

Other markets remain about the 
same. 

AXES.— We quote : $7.60 to $9.50 
per dozen ; double bitt axes, $9.50 to $12 
a dozen ; handled axes, $7.50 to $9.50 ; 
Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a dozen, 
follows: No. 3, $1.25; No. 2, $1.50; 
No. li, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34- 
inch, $2.20 a dozen; pick handles, No. 
2, $1.70; No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

LANTERNS— The normal business is 
being done, at the following prices: 
"Prism" globes, $1.20 ; Cold blast, 
$6.50; No. 0, Safety, $4.00. 

COW TIES AND STALL FIXTURES 
— We still quote: Cow ties dis- 
count 40 per cent, off list; stall 
fixtures, discount 35 per cent, off list. 

SLEIGH BELLS.— Some orders are 
being sent forward this week. We quote: 
Back Straps, 30c. to $2.50 ; 
body straps, 70c. to $3.50; York Eye 
bells, common, 70c. to $1.50; pear 
shape, $1.15 to $2; shaft gongs, 20c. to 
$2.50; Grelots, 35c. to $2; team bells, 
$1.80 to $5.50; saddle gongs, $1.10 to 
$2.60. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— Copper is 
still high and advance in ore 
expected. We quote : Best iron 

rivets, section, carriage, and 

wagon box black rivets, tinned do., cop- 
per rivets and tin swede rivets. 60, 
10 and 10 per cent.; swede iron burrs 



are gaoled at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, 
off new lists ; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of buns, 27A per cent 
oil, and coppered iron rivets and burrs 
in 5-lb. carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 
10 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 15 per 
cent., subject to usual charge for half 
pound boxes. 

HAY WIRE.— Last week's advanced 
prices are being firmly held. Our quo- 
tations are : No. 13, $2.55; No. 14. $2.- 
65; No. 15, $2.80; net cash, f.o.b. Mon- 
treal. 

MACHINE SCREWS.-Trade is about 
as usual. We quote: Flat head, iron, .'55 
per cent.; flat head, brass, 35 per cent.; 
Felisterhead, iron, 30 per cent.. Felister- 
head, brass, 25 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS.— Bolts are still 
scarce, no relief from the shortage hav- 
ing been experienced. Our discounts re- 
main: Carriage bolts, 3 and under 
fiO and 10; 7-16 and larger, 55 p.c; fancy 
carriage bolts, 50 p.c. ; sleigh shoe 
bolts, | and under, 60 per cent.; 7-16 
and over, 50 per cent.; machine bolts, | 
and under, 60 per cent.; 7-16 and larg- 
er, 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. -Sales this week 
have been large and prices are well main- 
tained. Discounts are as follows : 
C brand, 40, 10 and 7 per cent.; M.R.M. 
Co., 55 per cent.; P.P.. brand, 55 per 
cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— The market is now 
Brm at $2.30 per keg base f.o.b. Mon- 
treal. 

CUT NAILS— We continue to quote: 
$2.50 per 100 lbs.; M.R.M. Co., latest 
$2.30 per keg base, f.o.b. Montreal. 

HORSESHOES.— A steady busi- 
ness is reported. We quote as 
follows: P.P. new pattern, base price 
improved pattern iron shoes, light and 
medium pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.65 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.15. Light steel 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.25; featherweight, all sizes, 
No. to 4, $5.60. Toeweight, all 
sizes, No. 1 to 4, $6.85. Packing, up 
to three sizes in a keg, 10c. per 100 lbs. 
More than three sizes, 25c. per 100 lbs 
extra. 

BUILDING PAPER— Conditions re- 
main unchanged. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK— We 
are still quoting the following prices: 
"Lehigh" Portland in wood, $2.54, in 
cotton sacks, $2.39; in paper sacks, 
$2.31. Lefarge (non-staining) in wood. 
$3.40; Belgium, $1.60 to $1.90 per bar- 
rel; ex-store, American, $2 to $2.10 ex- 
cars; Canadian Portland, $2 to $2.05. 
Firebrick, English and Scotch, $17 to 
$21. American $30 to $35: White Bros.' 
English cement. $1.80 in bags. $2.05 in 
barrels in round lots. 

COIL CHATN— Last week's advance 
still holds. We are quoting as fol- 
lows : 5-16 inch, $4.40; 3-8 inch, 

81 



$3.90; 7 16 inch. |3.70 2 inch, $3.50; 

9 n; i,., i • inch, $3.35; 3 i 

inch, $3.20; 7-8 im-h. $3.10; 1 inch, 

$3.10. 

SHOT- — Our prices remain as folh 
Fhot packed in 25-11). bags, ordinary drop 
AAA to dust, $7 per 100 lbs.; chilled, 
No. 1—10, $7.50 per 100 lbs.; brick 
and seal, $8 per 100 lbs.; ball, 
$8.50 per 100 lbs. Net list. Haps less 
than 25 lbs., £c. per lb. extra, net ; 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, St. John, Halifax. 

AMMUNITION. — Trade is noi- 
mal. We are quoting as folh 
Loaded with black powder, 12 and 16 
gauge, per 1,000, $15; 10 gauge, per 
1,000, $18; loaded with smokeless pow- 
der, 12 and 16 gauge, per 1,000, $20.50; 

10 gauge, $23.50. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH. — Booking 
are very satisfactory. Our pi ic 
es are : In 100 foot rolls, $] 
per hundred square feet, in 50 feet 
rolls, $1.67£ per hundred square feet. 



Toronto Hardware Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto J»n ', 1907. 

Hardware markets arc very brisk, and 
several advances arc in force this week. 
The manufacturers of hinges in Canada 
have been compelled through the rapid- 
ly increasing prices of raw material and 
labor, to again advance prices in bin- 
ges, butts and builders' hardware of 
all kinds. Haw material for these lines 
has been exceptionally scarce and mer- 
chants would do well to order early for 
their season's requirements as it is 
possible that when the building season 
starts hardware stocks will 'e entirely 
run out of staple sizes. The der.cr.d 
from the West is so great that Ontario 
and Quebec jobbers will find it difficult 
to secure supplies. We are now quoting 
for, heavy tec and strap, I in.. $1 
5 in. $6.00; 6 in.. >r>.;-, --, -,o : in. 

12 and 14, $5.25, per 10(1 lbs. net Light 
tee and strap hinges now quoting at 
per cent., formerly 65 and 1(1. An advance 
is also made in Peterborough and Gur 
nev locks, advancing from 45 and In 
per cent, lo 37{ and 10, present quota- 
tion. 

Building paper is also quoted at an 
advance. E.2 and Surprise now 50c. and 
D.2. at 40c. The cause "f the advance 
of building paper t.-- due to the raise in 
raw materials, with the ever increaMne- 
Mid for these goods. 

ley tools have all advance,] 
per cent. Travelers have again resumed 



THE MARKET* 



Hardware and Metal 



their ilutio^ on the road and orders 
continue coming in very brisk. 

UCES AN i > HANDLES The busi- 
continues very hti-k in these lines. 
Still having large demands from North- 
ern Ontario. 

lil ILDERS HARDWARE Orders 

have started tor this line as retailers 

gee the advantage ol ordering early. 

A> a shortage is likelj to be reported 

ae lines. 

SPORTING GO( >l»s Hockey Bticks 
and skates continue to soil briskls \ 
banner year i- reported in all linos of 
these goods. 

CHAIN We -till continue to 
quote: :, s i". $3.50; 9-16 in., $3.55; l /z 
r-16 in ; s i"-. $4-10; 

5 16 in. $4.70; 1-1 in. $5.1/). 

RIVETS AND Hi MRS No chang 
anticipated in these articles, ami re 
main a- quoted last week, 274 -ot wait. 
on rivets ami 1") per cent. on burrs. 

SCREWS Stocks are being rapidly 
repleted, as manufacturers are giving 
their best efforts to moot the demand. 

BOLTS AND Nl TS Large orders for 
these are prophesied a- a great deal of 
structural work is being done through- 
out the country. 

TOOLS Carpenters' tools, hand saws 
etc.. are in great demand. Retail mer- 
chants repleting their stock for spring. 

SHOVELS Not much doing in shov- 
el- at the present time, but spades, til- 
ing and garden, have started to move. 

LANTERNS -The demand -till exists 
and selling $6.50 per dozen. 

EXTENSION AND STEP LADDERS 
— Prices continue as follows : Step lad-. 
dors at 10c. per foot for 3 to (i feet, ami 
lie. per foot for 7 to 10 feet ladders. 
Wagoner extension ladders, 40 per cent. 

POULTRY NETTING— We quote : 2- 
inch mesh. 19 w.g., discount 50 and 10 
per cent. All others 50 per cent. 

WIRE FENCING.— Barb and plain 
twist fencing, galvanized and coiled 
spring wire are all firm at the advanc- 
ed prices. 

OILED AND ANNEALED WIRE - 
(Canadian)— Gauge 10, $2.31; gauge 11, 
$2.37 ; gauge 12, $2.45 per 100 lbs. 

WIRE NAILS— Nails still remain firm 
at the advanced price, but owing to tin- 
high price of raw material, another ad- 
vance is warranted. 

CUT NAILS- We quote $2.30 base 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto 20c higher. 

IIORSENA1LS— "C" brand, 40, 10 
and 74 off list. "M.R.M." brand, 55 per 
oft. "Monarch" brand, 50 and 1\ 
off. "Peerless," 50 per cent. off. 

HORSESHOES— Our quotations con- 
tinue as follows : P.B. base, $3.65 ; 
"M.R.M. Co., latest improved pattern" 
iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No 2 and larger, $3.80 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.05 ; snow, No. 2 and larger, 
$1.05 : No. 1 and smaller, $4.30 ; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4.15 . 
No 1 and smaller, $4.40 ; featherweight, 
all sizes, to 4, $5.75; toeweight, all 
sizes 1 to 4, $7. Packing, up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c. per 100 lbs. extra ; 
more than three sizes in a keg, 25c. per 
lnfi lbs. extra. 

HORSE BLANKETS AND SLEIGH 
BEL! /S Ov ing i<> the mild wreath i 
lately the demand has fallen off some, 



but should the eold weather return will 
liven them up. 

BUILDING I' \1'1-:k The advance on 
building paper is owing to the high 
price of raw material, also the Large 
demand Eor paper. 

CEMENT— We quote : For carload or- 
ders, f.o.b. Toronto, Canadian Portland, 
$1.95. For smaller orders ex warehouse, 
Canadian Portland, $2.05 upwards. 

FIREBRICK— English and Scotch fire 
brick $27 to $30 ; American low-grade, 
$23 to $25 ; high-grade, $27.50 to $35. 

HIDES. WOOL AND FURS.— The sup- 
ply of hides is in excess of the demand 
but the course of the market is uncer- 
tain. Prices are slightly lower than a 
week ago. 

Hirtes, inspected, oows and steers, ho. 1 II 

No. 2 lu 

C\ miii try hides, flat, per lb., cured 1" 

" green l>9 

Oalf skins, Ho. 1, city V12 

" " No. 1, country 11 

Lambskins 120 

Horse hides, No. 1 3 60 3 75 

Rendered tallow, per 11- 05} 051 

Pulled wools, super, per lb 25 

•utm • 27 

Wool, u.iwaahed fleece 15 

" w. shed fleece 24 25 

FURS. 

No. 1, Prime 

Raccoon 140 

Mink, dark 4 50 5 50 

" pale 2 50 3 50 

Fox, red 3(0 3 5i) 

" cross 3 00 5 00 

F.ynx 5 01) 6 50 

Bear, black 1 00 

" rubs and yearlings 5 00 

Wolf, timber 2 7 

" prairie 1 25 

Weasel, white 60 

Badger 1 .' 

Fisher, dark 5 00 6 00 

Skunk, black 125 

sh"rt stripe 1 90 

" " long striped 50 

Marten 3 50 20 00 

Muskrat., fall 16 

" winter 2) 

spring (i 23 

' wetern 12 16 



Montreal Metal Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, January 4, 1907 

Copper is still advancing. Stocks j-re 
Light, and deliveries ire somewhat hard 
to get. 

Many Idl'ge meta] brokers are unable 
to quote. 

The expected revisit i in Lu? boilc- 
lube prices has at last taken place. 

There have been many little fluctua- 
tions during the week, but the tone of 
the market still remains very strong. 

There is a rumor about that a very 
important advance is about to take 
place in the British market, but this 
has not been confirmed. 

There have also been several consider- 
able contracts placed for structural 

steels, etc. 

COPPER.— Still further advances have 
taken place this week, and it is thought 
that the market will go higher. We are 
now quoting: Ingot copper. 26c to 26$c; 
Sheet eopper, base sizes, 34c. 

[NGOT TIN— This metal continues 
firm, but we -till quote : 4G|,c. to 47c. 
pei lb. 

ZINC SPELTER— Zinc is in a verv 
strontr position in the market. We con 



tin ue io quote: $7.25 to $7.50 per bun- 
dled pounds. 

I '1(1 LEAD.— Higher prices in Eng 
land have boosted quotations here and 
we now quote: $5.50 to $5.60 per hun- 
dred pounds. 

ANTIMONY — Our price remains 
27 1 £ to 28c per pound. 

I'M; IKON— We still quote as fol- 
low.-: Londonderry, $21..">o ; Carron, No. 
1. $24.50; Carron'. special. $23.50; Snin- 
merlee, No, 2. selected, $25.00; Summer- 
lee, No. :;. B oft, $23.50. 

BOILER TUBES.— The expected new 
prices have at last coine to light, 1 ' I" 
2 inch. $9.50; '_", inch, $10.35; 2', inch. 
$11.50; :: inch. $13.00; 3j inoli. $17.00; 
4 inch, $21.50; 5 inch, $45.00. 

TOOL STEEL— We quote : Colonial 
Black Diamond, 8c. to 9c; Sanderson's, 
8c. to 45c, according to grade; Jes- 
sop's, 13c; .lonas & Colver's, 10c to 
20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per pound; 
Conqueror, 74c; Conqueror high speed 
steel, 60c; Jowitt's Diamond J., 6jc 
to 7c; Jowitt's best, lie to 114c. 

MERCHANT STEEL.— Our prices 

are as follows: Sleigh shoe, $2.25; tire, 
$2.40, spring, $2.75; toecalk, $3.05; 
machinery iron finish, $2.40 ruled 
machinery steel, $2.75; mild, $2.25 base 
and upwards; square barrow teeth 
$2.40; band steel, $2.45 base. Net cash 
30 days. Uivet steel quoted on appli- 
cation, 

COLD ROLLED SHAFTING 

There is an advance of 25 cents per 
hundred lbs. over last week's quota- 
tions. Present prices are: 3-16 inch to 
| inch, $7.25; 5-16 inch to 11-32 inch, 
$6.20; 1 inch to 17-32 inch. $5.15; 0-1 (i 
inch to 47-64 inch, $4.45; J inch Ufr 
17-16 inch, $4.10: T. inch to 3 inch. 
$3.75; 3i to 3 7-16 inch, $3.02; 3J inch 
to 3 15-16 inch. $4.10; 4 inch to 4 7-16 
inch, $4.45; 4* inch to 4 15-lli inch, 
$4.80. This is equivalent to 30 per 
cent, off list. 

GALVANIZED IRON.— Eirmness pre- 
vails in the market. We are still quoting 
Queen's Head, 28 gauge, $4.60 to $4.85; 
26 gauge, $4.45; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.00; 
16 to 20 gauge, $3.75; Apollo, 28 gauge. 
$4.45 to $4.70; 26 gauge, $4.30; 22 and 
24 gauge, $3.75; 16 and 20 gauge, $3.60; 
Comet, 28 -range, $4.45 to 

$4.70; 26 gauge, $4.30 to $4.45; 
22 and 24, gauge, $3.75 to $4.00; $16 to 
20 gauge, $3.60 to $3.85; Fleur-de-Lis, 
28 gauge, $4.45 to $4.70; 26 gauge. 
$4.30; 22 and 24 gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 
gauge, $3.60; Gorbals "Best Best," 
28 gauge, $4.45; Colborne Crown. 28 
gauge, $4.45; 26 gauge, $4.30; 24 gauge. 
$3.75. In less than ease lots, 25c ex- 
tra. 



Toronto Metal Markets . 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 4. 1907 

The markets this week are compara- 
tively quiet, few changes being made. 

and business being interrupted slightly 



32 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



by the holiday week as well as by a e 

lii'usrs taking stuck. All prices remain 
very firm, however, the changes made 
all being increases. 

Bar Iron has advanced another pen, 
and is now al $2.30, with 2 per cent. 
off. As indicated by lis senile weeks 

ago, the turn of the year lias al rengl h 

ened rather than weakened the bar mar 

ket. Appollo galvanized sheets are also 
up aboul ten cents, and there is talk ol 
other sheets advancing. The only other 
change is in boiler tubes, certain sixes 

of which show advances. 

Copper and lead keep very tirni with 
stocks still short, and deliveries hard 
to get. Tin is also firm. 

Complaints of slow deliveries from 
Montreal are still coming' in, one case 
being a ear load of bar iron which took 
from November 5, to December 25, to 
be transported from the wharf to the 
Vnstomcr, the rail trip occupying five 
days. 

PIG IRON.— Hamilton, Midland and 
Londonderry are off the market, and 
Radnor is quoted at $33 at furnace. 
Middlesborough is quoted at $24.50, and 
Summerlee, at $26 f.o.b., Toronto. 

BAR IRON. — Bar continues hard' to 
get and we still quote: $2.3(1, f.o.b., To- 
ronto with 2 per cent, discount. 

INGOT TIN— Buying is still lively 
and prices unchanged at 46 to 46 l-2c 
per pound. 

TIN PLATES— Market continues ac- 
tive and prices firm at recent advances. 

SHEETS AND PLATES.— Apollo] gal- 
vanized sheets has been advanced ten 
cents, and is now quoted at $4.70 for 
10 3-4 ounce. Active buying is reported 
with prices steady. Stocks are light. 

BRASS. — We continue to quote: 26 to 
27' •>(' per pound for sheets. Brass 
ha- advanced 3c per pound. 

TOPPER — Shortages are reported 
with prices still on the upward 
climb. "We now quote: Ingot copper 
$26 per 100 lbs., and sheet copper $31 
to $32 per 100 lbs. 

LEAD — Market is active and prices 
very firm. We quote: $5.40 for imported 
pig' and $5.75 to $6.00 for bar lead. 

ZINC SPELTER— Stocks continue 
light with market firm and active. We 
qulote 7^c. per lb. for foreign and 7c. 
per lb. for domestic. Sheet zinc is quot- 
ed at 8 l-4c. in casks, and 8 l-2c. in 
part casks. 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES— We 
quote : Plates, per 100 lbs., i in. to h 
in., $2.50; % in., $2.35 heads, per 100 
lbs., $2.75; tank plates, 3-16 in., $2.65; 
tubes, per 100 feet, 1* in., $8.50; 2, $9; 
2 1-2. $11.30; 3, $12.50; 3 1-2, $16; 4. 
$20.00. Terms, 2 per cent. off. 

ANTIMONY— Market is active, and 
stocks scarce. Prices firm at 27c. to 
28c. 

OLD MATERIAL.— Dealers' buying 
prices still continue as follows: 
Heavy copper and wire. 18ic, 



copper and w ire. 1H 1 '_.-, 

per lb.; lighl copper L6J per lb.; 

heavj red brass. Hi'-jc per ll>.; beavj 

yellow In 1 58, 1 I ' e per lb. ; light 
'brass Id', c per lb. ; tea lead, - 
per loo lbs.; heavy lead, $4.10 per LOO 

lbs., sera)) zinc, 1 1 » per lb. ; iron No 
1 wrought, $1 I. in); Sfo. 2 wrought, $8 to 
$8; machinerv cast scrap, $18.50 to $18; 
si. \e plate. $18 to $1 I. malleable 

Steel, $8; old rubbers, lie per pound; 

country mixed rags, $1 to $1.25 per L00 
lbs., according to quality. 

COAL — The following prices are quot- 
ed on coal, slack being short, 

Standard Hocking soft coal f.o.b. at 
mines, lump $1.75, =| inch, $1.05, run 
of mine, $1.40, nut, $1.25; N. & S. 
$1.10; P. & S., 85c, 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars, bond- 
ed at bridges; lump, $2.00; } inch, 
$2.i 0; mine run, $2.60; slack, $2.25. 



United States Metal Markets 

Prom thd iron Ag6, Jau 3 lyor. 
The Conviction is general throughout 

the iron industry that the present tre- 
mendous rale of consumption will con- 
tinue during the first hall' of the cur- 
rent year, coupled with prevailing gen- 
erally profitable prices. 

There are very many who are acting 
on the belief that work for lull capacity 
at present or even better prices is as- 
sured for the whole of the year 1907. 
They point to the order books, which on 
the surface look very encouraging in- 
deed, but which might be turned to a 
ragged exhibit, after a rush of cancel- 
lations such as the trade has witnessed 
before under similar conditions. There 
is a disposition to exaggerate the sta- 
bility of "orders" which it is well to 
guard against. 

The iron industry is passing again 
through one of its frequent experiences 
of being caught unawares by a rapidly 
expanding consumption, followed by a 
feverish activity to provide adequate 
producing facilities, which at first fall 
into line disappointingly slowly and then 
make themselves felt surprisingly sud- 
denly. That may make its appearance 
during the second half of 1007. 

In its last analysis the course of 
events in the second half of 1907 will 
depend first upon the crops, and sec- 
ond upon the ability of our country to 
finance the betterments and enlarge- 
ments of its producing and transporta- 
tion facilities. Time only can tell as 
to the first, while as to the second we 
may have ample warning througb long 
continued tightness of the money mar- 
ket. 

The holiday week lias not sensiblv 
affected the activity which has char- 
acterized the markets for some m.mths 
past. In the Eastern pig iron markets 
there have been further sales of basic 
pig iron, and some round lots of foun- 
dry and forge iron have been Dlaced 
The Buffalo furnaces during the last 
two weeks of the vear booked about 
50,000 tons of malleable ami foundry 
iron, and there has beer some livelv 
buying for the last half in the Chi 

33 



district, with more pending. A- yet 
nothing has been done in the way oi 
purchases "i large l"i foun- 

dry iron for agricultural interest 

Th, report is current that two v. 
roads have placed on rega 

oo.noii tons for L908 delivery, which 
may In- interpreted ;is meaning that so 
much rolling capacity has been et 
ed. 

Among the sales of st ructural n 
,a| ie a lot of 1,500 tong for live build- 
ings in San Francisco. It is believed 
that during the current year a vers 
considerable tonnage will be required 

I'm- the stricken city. This is in line 
with the earlier expectations thai the 
true demand would not develop until 
a considerable time alter the disaster. 

From the Iron Tra I- Rsriew, n.wlnnrl. Jan. S, 1907. 

The iron ami steel industry enters 
the new year with the demand for boll, 
raw and finished materials of all kinds 
much stronger than at the beginning 
of l!)()(i. The increase in consuming 
capacity, especially in the east, has been 
tremendous during th. pasl year and 
there are no indications that produc- 
tion will be greater than the demand. 

A very active market for pig iron 

vailed during the (dosing days of the 
year in the easl anil in Chicago, though 
in other centres buyers were more con- 
servative. Heavy sales of basic are 
reported in the easl, while foundry con- 
sumers of the most conservative class 
are buying extensively for last half de- 
livery. Foreign iron is reaching further 
westward, the past lew days witm 
the first sale of British iron in Cleve- 
land for nearly live years. The sOU- 
thern pig iron situation is firm, though 
hampered by the car shortage which 
shows little improvement. 

Two large eastern Pennsylvania rail 
manufacturers have announced that 
they will not take any more orders for 
standard sections fur delivery after 
August, except at $30, an advance of 
$2 per ton. This is the highest price 

asked for Bessemer rails since 1901, 
and the action is significant as indica- 
ting an increasing spirit of indepen- 
dence among manufacturers. It is not 
expected that the leading producer will 
advance quotations. The action of the 
independents emphasizes the strength 
of th,. finished material market, where 
the advances have not been as rapid as 
ii> crude and semi-finished materials. 

In other finished lines, with the ex- 
ception of structural materials, there 
is very brisk demand. Plate and sheet 
specifications are extremely heavy, 
scarcely a ton of old contracts being 
unspecified lor at the (dose of the year. 
Merchant bars are active and the de- 
mand for wire products is undiminished. 

The holiday season has been produc- 
tive of sharp decline in sheet quota) 
linns at Chicago and other centres. 
though the market as yet cannot be 
called weak. There is a serious coke 
shortage in the Chicago district with 
some relief being afforded by the output 
of local by-product ov< 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



London, Eng., Metal Markets 

From Metal Market KeiH<rt. .Ian ?. I'.'.:. 

Cleveland warrants are quoted at 61s. 
and Glasgow Standard warrants 
at 6ls . making price as compared with 
la-t week yd. lowei on Cleveland war- 
rants, and i d. lower "ii Glasgow Stand 
aid warrants. 

TIN Spol Tin opened steady at 
11'-. futures at £194 LOs:; and after 

ol I7fl tons of ^|><.t and 150 
of future-, closed steadj at £193 10s. 
spot, G19-1 10s. for futures making 
price compared with las! week £3 low- 
er on spol and £] l'_'s. 6d. lower on 
futui 

COPPER Spot Copnei opened steady 
at £106 5s., tH t u- 12s. 6d., and 

after sales of 250 tons of spot and 1000 
tons of raturi id steady at £105 

r spot, and I 5. 6d for tut 

ures making price compared with lasl 
week 10s. lower 011 spot and tl 13s. 
'■d. higher on futures. 

l.KAD— The market closed at £19 18s. 
■ 1(1.. making price as compared with last 

week Ls. "d higher. 

SPELTER-The market closed at 
£28, making price as compared with 
la-t week unchanged. 



N.B. Hardware Trade News 

- John, X. If. Dec. 31. 

The close of the year 1906 is the clos- 
ing of a year of good business for the 
hardware people of New Brunswick. 
That seems to be the consensus of opin- 
ion, thouerh they are, of course, some of 
those persons always to be found with 
words of complaint: The demand for 
hardware goods has been steady 
throughout the year, apparently there 
has been considerable money in circula- 
tion and bad debts seem to have be- 
a trifle less numerous, some deal- 
ers reporting- a marked growth in the 
tendency of customers to do cash 
In St. John it sr 15 there has b •< n 
a rather pcorer business in build -rs 
hardware than in some other years. 
The number of new buildings put up lias 
not been what was hoped for and con- 
sequently hardware of the type mention- 
ed has not, been so strongly in demand 
as in some other years. The greater 
part of what may be called the build- 
ing, operations of the year have no' 

in the erection of new but tin n 
modelling of old structures. Naturally, 
too. under these circumstances the men 
of the plumbing department of many of 
the hardware concerns were not as busi- 
ly encaged as usual. The mildness of 
last winter and the indications of mild 
weather durinr: the coming season have 
doubtless affected the demands for 
plumbing. Tn other lines of the hard 
ware trade, however, 1906 has been a 
successful year in St. John. Perhaps 
the most striking feature of the inar- 
kets was the practically unexampled 
stiffness of prices Apparently, too, 
their- is no 1-- f any chance in 

price conditions in the immediate fu- 
ture. Tndeed the tendency seems to be 
towards even higher figures than those 
now prevailing-. 

The Christmas trade, the deah-i 

Unt. Certainly it seemed to 
your correspondent that the number of 
peonle thronging city stores was s 
er than usual and that it was only nat- 
ural to believe that business would be 



a- a consequence. Dealers in 
sporting goods cannot 1m- pleased, how- 
ever, at the mildness of the weathet A 

continuance of it mu.-t surely mean a 
■ Made in winter sporting goods 
than has been anticipated. 



< luce before in this column attention 
drawn to the window dressing of 
St. John hardware -tores. At that 
time yoUr correspondent expressed doubt 
as to whether or not the hardware men 
here gave adequate attention to 
the dressing- of their store windows. 
The doubt still exists, indeed, it has 
mown stronger. Some of the men ap- 
parently give practically no thought to 
this department of their business; oth- 
er- give but very little. At Christmas 
time the special efforts put forth— in 
some cases one is lead to ask : were 
there am efforts worth the name f— did 
not result in the production of any dis- 
plays worth] of especial note. One or 
two of the windows attracted a good 
deal of attention but it is not at all 
clear that this fact is attachable to 
skilled window dressing. Surely, St. 
John hardwaremen should give this 
matter more attention. The question 
may be raised, too : Do our merchants 
give sufficient careful thought to the 
method of their advertising- ? Some of 
the advertisements seen are certainly 
not particularly forceful. 



The business done by the stove deal- 
ers has on the whole been very satisfac- 
tory. City trade has been good and 
with some firms at least, the sale of 
stoves to persons in the country has 
been exceptionally gratifying. The out- 
look is believed to be for somewhat 
higher quotations in the Spring than 
prevailed last season. 

Metal prices continue unusually strong. 
It is thought by local men that further 
advances are imminent. 



It is reported that a car making 
plant will shortly be started here. There 
are many rumors but little definite in- 
formation has so far been obtainable. 
Another report had it that the Mari- 
time Rail Works Company has planned 
the erection here of a much larger plant 
than it now has. Rolling mills on a 
generous scale are said to be included in 
the plan. Mr. S. B. Elkin, secretary- 
treasurer of the company, has denied 
the truth of the report. At the same 
time there is good reason for believing 
that the company anticipates develop- 
ment here or elsewhere. It may be that 
Halifax is under consideration as offer- 
ing a desirable location for an enlarged 
place for the concern. 



The regular meeting of the Maritime 

Hardware Association was recently held 

here. Tt has not transpired, however, 

that anvthing more than routine busi- 

- a- under discussion. 



Mr Charles Clark, for some years a 
traveling representative of the Thomas 
Davidson Company, is to join the staff 
of the National Cash Register Com- 
pany. 

34 



N.S. Hardware Trade News 

Halifax, N.S., Jan. 1, 1907. 

The year just closed has been a re- 
markably prosperous One for the hard- 
ware merchants of Halifax. All 
branches of the trade have been brisk, 
and the outlook for the year 1907 is 
most promising. The na\l situation 
now absorbs considerable attention, the 
record advances having- caused the 
trade to wonder what the next move 
will be. Nails are now quoted at $2.60 
base, for cut, and $2.50 for wire, the 
highest prices recorded here for a long 
time. 

The yield of gold in Nova Soctia du- 
ing- the past year is estimated at 13,- 
000 ounces, the value of which is $260,- 
000. The gold mining industry has been 
rather quiet in Nova Scotia for some 
time past, but the coming' year will 
probably witness a revival of the in- 
dustry. Several properties have chang- 
ed hands, and the new owners intend 
to develop them on an extensive scale. 
The property at Oldham which has been 
a big producer in the pas! is being 
pumped mil, and good returns are an- 
ticipated. At. Isaac's Harbor and other 
places considerable development is now- 
going on, and in several gold bearing 
sections of the Province, new machinery 
is being installed. 



B.C. Hardware Trade News 

December 28, 1906. 

No class of labor observes the Christ- 
mas holiday season more religiously 
(though not in a religious sense) than 
the loggers. Every steamer arriving 
from up-coast points for the past week 
or more has brought down a full pass- 
enger list, nine-tenths of whom were 
loggers intent on having a really good 
time during the holiday wecta in the 
coast cities. A slight excuse is given 
these men at this season for as a rule 
in northern logg-ing districts there is a 
good deal of snow, even at the coast, 
and the damp character of snow in, the 
woods close to the ocean makes logging 
operations difficult. Be that as it mav 
not less than a thousand to fifteen hun- 
dred sturdy loggers have left the 
lumber camps to make merry in the 
city. The effect is felt d'irectlv in the 
log 1 market for no mills have had a 
surplus stock on hand and the winter 
has not found any store ahead as very 
often occur? 

A result of the temporary reduction in 
the output is an increase in price and 
no logs can be bought at less than $10 
per thousand at the camps, while it 
takes $1.50 to tow them to the mill. 
No wonder then that mill men are al- 
ready discussing another raise in the 
price of the sawn lumber. This too. 
when demand is usunllv less than at 
other times. How the mills are g-oing 
to cope with next, season's demands is 
difficult to see for even from the prairie 
the call for lumber has not let up as 
it usually does in the winter. The an- 
nual shut-down of most of the mills is 
likelv to be very much reduced and the 
needed overhaul made in short order 
this year, for time is valuable when all 
lumber cut is sold months ahead. 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



Facing :i new year, the provinci 
British Columbia finds itself in co 
lion |of ii 1 1 1 > i < •<-(-. i. 1 1 1 . ■« 1 prosperity, tn 
the three chief industries, mining, lum- 
bering and the fisheries, most satisfac 
lory results ua> e mayke I the year 1906. 
In the lumber indrisfry more especially, 
conditions are extraordinary. Thai the 
present prices of lumber, high as they 
are in comparison w H h a ft a yeai 
ago, are to remain and perhaps increase, 
is the opinion oi many well posted iu 
tl.e trade. Very greatly increased 
i>L' production is the chief reason givi n 
for the belief thai price o.f lumber is 
up to stay. Bui the great and growing 
demand in the Canadian Northwesl is 
perhaps the greater factor. Mills sim 
ply cannot keep up with their orders. 

I sually the winter season marks :i les 

sening of demand Prom the pi a iri< 
provinces, bul the shipments have been 
so Far short of requirements during the 

past season, thai orders have kept up 
right along-, and many orders for nexi 
year's business have already been plac- 
ed. 

A good indication op the expansion 
of the lumber trade in !'».('. is taken 
from the reports of the provincial de- 
partment of Lands and Works, under 
which all timber leases are made and 
dues collected. The returns from this 
source in 1905 were nearly throe quar- 
ters of a million dollars. For 1900, 
the Chief Commissioner is authority for 
the statement that the receipts of re- 
venue from timber sources arc expected 
to total '$1,000,000. There is bul one 
explanation, and that is that Hie timber 
areas of B.C. are becoming valuable in 
the eyes of the timber men and cap- 
italists, and the big demand for timber 
is a guarantee that the forests of B.C. 
will be drawn on indefinitely, and for 
increasing' amounts every year. 

Some interest is evinced among- tim- 
ber operators as to the outcome of re- 
presentations made recently to the gov- 
ernment by loggers and mill men for 
cancellation of reserves for pulp leases 
In each case it is the idea to cancel 
leases which have been held specula- 
tively, and not to hamper a concern 
actually endeavoring- to develop pulp 
timber reserved. There are a number 
of large areas so reserved, and so far, 
with but one exception, that of the Can- 
adian Pacific Sulphite Pulp Co., which 
is developing its biddings at Rwanson 
Bay, and intends going ahead with a 
pulp mill, nothing- has been done since 
these leases were granted under spe- 
cial regulations enacted some three or 
four years ago. 

• « * 

New Westminster is rapidly coming 
to the front as a manufacturing ce 
Its new glass works, the Crystal Olas*- 
Co., being the name of the concern, is 
rapidly being got into shape, the "New- 
Westminster Soap Co., another new- in- 
dustry, is also being put on active basis, 
while the Schaake Machine Works is 
enlarging its plant. The Brunette Saw 
Mill is also erecting a mill for cutting 
cedar lumber and shingles. 



Nanaimo industries are progressing 
Eavorably. A new coal company has 

formed ome 

16 miles from tin Western 

< o. IS ;i 

ing its works and im- 

acilities at the wharves. \ 

cold storage plant is also to bo e I ib 

i by a company now bi iniZ 

ed, the intention being to 1'iiriiLh stoi 
Mies for storing fruit, t^sli,. 
prodncl perish., 

w idle wailing transportation. The I 
inion Government is to be asked For 
a bonus "I -Inn. unit under exi inj n 
gnlalions by which a bonus of 30 per 
cent, of the cos( is given such plants, 
the rates charged for service, being- in 
leturn under regnlal ion of the 1 dominion 
Department of Agriculture. 
The Alley line steamer, Pondo, from 

New Zealand, reached porl on Wednes- 
day with a 2,000 ton cargo, mainly- 
consisting of wool, lla\ and hardwood, 
with some hundreds of tens id' ia v 
sugar from Fiji for the B.C. Sugar 
Refinery. The shipments of New Zea 
land woo] go across I In- country to 
Montreal. On her outward voyage the 
Hondo, which is scheduled to sail dan. 
I, will take large consignments of Can 
adian machinery, ('apt. Large of the 
Pondo saw the New Zealand Kxhibition 
;il Christchurch and he stales that tlic 
Canadian exhibit is the most popular 
in the whole exhibition. 

* * * 

The Victoria Trades & Labor Coun- 
cil objects to the contractors for the 

new Canadian government hydrographio 
steamer, the B.C. Marine Railway Co., 
importing the machinery for the new- 
vessel from England instead of making- 
it locally as was the understanding 
when the contract was awarded. The 
vessel is to be built at Esquimalt. 

* * * 

Provincial Mineralogist Robertson, is 
authority for the estimate that the out- 
put of B.C. mines for 1900 will exceed 
in value the output of 1905 by over '_'} 
millions of dollars, lie bases his fig- 
ures on the increased prices paid for 
the principal metals, silver, copper and 
lead, while admitting that though 
strikes at Pernie in the coke-producing 
district, the mines were hampered for 
find and the smelters were also reduced. 

According- to Mr. Robertsons figures. 
there Were 3.100,000 ounces of silver 
mined last year, o7.(i92.000 lbs. of cop- 
per, and ;")(;'..")80,000 of lead. These fig- 
ures may not be exceeded, but silver 1ms 
netted producers 7c more per ounce this 
year, copper -1c per lb. more, and lend 
Ic per lb. more. 

Mr. Robertson looks for a marvellous 
development in mining in the new Telle- 
w.-i country, tributary to the Skcena 
River, and which will be opened up by 
the G.T.P. Vast deposits of coal as 
well as very rich veins of copper ore 
have been located. Several companies 
have already been formed to open up 
some of these properties. 

* * * 

Local hardware market notes are fea- 
tureless, almost, since the Christmas 

3.". 



is over. In builders' hardware. 

■ ne up to $3.10 
nails. Turpentine is now quoted at 
$10.85 instead of $10.25. 

• « » 

Exi reme act ivit \ marks all 1 
nected with the Lumber industry, With 

in the week, t WO "I I fa 

have changed ownei hip 
In both oases local or at tea i Canadi- 
an capital has been mainh in! 
which is a char Most of 1 be big 
deals oi late made on 

capital brought in I the ' nited 

Si ates. 

The Pacific Coasl L-nmbei Company, 
which 'has had two man D the 

m.i i turned a syndi- 

licaded I. .,' \ all 

ci, aver and the new owners will take 
charge at the beginning of the year. 
SdcCormick one of the heaviest 
stockholders, and his Eastern associates 
have combined to sell a controlling- in- 
terest in this splendid mill to the 
new owners. Geo. McCormick, jr., has 
managing retirement of : 

\Y. L. Tait, retires and the new owners 
will name their manager at the time 
tihey take over the mill. 

At the same moment that they sold 
the Pacific Coast mill the McCormick 
interests were negotiating for the pur- 
chase of the Canadian Pacific Lumber 
Company's mill at Port .Moody. This 
deal was consummated on the same day 
that the sale of the Pacific Coast mill 
was completed, though one did not de- 
pend on the other. The Port Moodv 
mill was owned bv a company compris- 
ed of T. W. Paterson, M.P.P., of Vic- 
toria, his nephew T.Frank Paterson, oi 
Vancouver and Messrs. Perry D. Roe 
and Robert Aberncthev of Port Moody. 
These gentlemen will all retire, for the 
present from active mill-operation on 
the coast. T. \Y. Patterson never took 
an active part in the management of the 
mill, while T. V. Patterson is now 
heavily interested in logging operations 
and handling timber limits. Messrs. 
Roe and Abernethcy are not yet decid 
ed as to their movements, but still re- 
tain interests on the coast, which will 
take up their attention. 

Another change in mill proprietorship 
is expected to take place at the end of 
the year. The McLaren sash and door 
factory, known as the Vancouver Sash 
& Door Co.. has been bought out by 
Messrs. Robertson & Ifackett, saw- 
millers, whose mill is deixt beside the 
factory on P'alse Creek. Some time ago 
they had part of their plant burned and 
the purchase of the factory gives them 
equipment to replace that which was 

oyed. 

* * * 

Coal demand is very keen on the 
coast at the present moment. The big 
Treadwell mine in Alaska has had to 
shut down its stamp mill for want of 
fuel, and they arc bringing it from Aus- 
tralia. The difficult; is that not suffici- 
ent increase in the working -taff at the 
various coast mines has been made to 
provide for the greatly increased con- 
sumption. 

With the completion of the Nicola 
valley branch of the C.P.R. a very 
short line from the rich Nicola eoal 
fields to the coast has been provided. 
One coal company i- getting ready to 
ship though it will be three months be- 
lt will do so. Others are prepar- 
to operate also, now that the rails 
have been laid. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



There is 
Twenty Years 
of Experience 
in this Can 




Doesn't this point the 
way for you ? Stephen's 
Pure Paint has now a 
proven record of over 
twenty years' hard use, 
under many difficult con- 
ditions. 

Every gallon is made 
with Manitoba Linseed 
Oil — properly aged — this 
increases not only the 
body, but also the wear- 
ing qualities of the paint. 

Our extensive Adver- 
tising creates the demand 
Will you supply it in your 
territory '.' 

Write for our special 
plan, tells how " We help 
you Sell." 

G.F. Stephens & Co. 

Limited 

PAINT AND COLOR DEALERS 

WINNIPEG, CANADA 



MANITOBA HARDWARE AND METAL MARKETS 

(Market quotations corrected by telegraph up to 12 a.m. Friday, Jua. 4 1907.) 

in 511, Union Bank Building, Office of Hardware and Mktal, Winnipeg, Man. 



The Chi Lsl mas I rade La all lines of 
hardware ami metal was an exception- 
ally good one and wholesalers stale 
thai thej are nighlj gratified with the 
business done. With the arrival of the 
holidays, business became quiet and the 
pa'sl week has been comparatively dull, 
tfosl ..i the Local linns are preparing 
took baking operations and getting 
ready for the \-« Fear's trade. Trices 
lmld linn at practically no change from 
the previous week. Judging Erom the 
reports of builders the coming year will 
witness a renewal of last season's re- 
markable activity in building and all 
supplies needed in such operations will 
be in active demand. 

LANTERNS. — Quotations are ,as 
follows: Cold blast, per dozen, $6.50; 
coppered cold blast, per dozen, $8.50; 
cold blast dash, per dozen, $8.50. 

WIRE— We quote as follows : Barbed 
wire, 100 lbs., $2.90 ; plain galvanized, 
6 to 8, $3.39 ; 10, $3.50 ; 12, $3.10 ; 13 
$3.20 ; 14, $3.90 ; 15, $4.45 ; 16, $4.60; 
plain twist, $3 ; staples, $3.50 ; oiled 
annealed wire, 10, $2.96 ; 11, $3.02 ; 12, 
$3.10 ; 13, $3.20 ; 14, $3.30 ; 15, $3.45. 
Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

HORSESHOES — Quotations are as 
follows : Iron, No. to No. 1, $4.65 ; 
No. 2 and larger, $4.40 ; snowshoes, No. 
to No. 1, $4.90 ; No. 2 and larger, 
$4.65 ; steel, No. to No. 1, $5 ; No. 2 
and larger, $4.75. 

HORSENAILS — Lists and discounts 
are quoted as follows : No. 10, 20c. ; 
No. 9, 22c. ; No. 8, 24c. ; No. 7, 26c. ; 
No. 6, 28c. ; No. 5, 32c. ; No. 4, 40c, 
per pound. Discounts are auoted as fol- 
lows : "C" brand, 40, 10 and 74 per 
cent., "M" brand and other brands, 55 
and 60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

WIRE NAILS.— Quoted now at $2.70 
per keg. 

CUT NAILS.— As noted last week 
cut nails have been advanced to $2.90 
per keg. 

PRESSED SPIKES — Prices are 
quoted as follows since the recent ad- 
vance: i x 5 and 6, $4.75; 5-6 
x 5, 6 and 7, $4.40; f x 6, 7 and 8, 
$4.25; 7-16 x 7 and 9, $4.15; 4 x 8, 9, 10 
and 12, $4.05; £ x 10 and 12, $3.90. All 
other lengths 25c. extra net. 

SCREWS — Discounts are as follows : 
Flat head, iron, bright, 85 and 10 p.c. ; 
round head, iron, 80 p.c. ; flat head, 
brass, 75 and 10 p.c. ; round head, brass 
70 and 10 p.c. ; coach, 70 p.c. 

NUTS AND BOLTS — Discounts are 
unchanged and continue as follows : 
Bolts, carriage, f or smaller, 60 and 5 ; 
bolts, carriage, 7-16 and up, 55 ; bolts, 
machine, £ and under, 55 and 5 ; bolts, 
machine, 7-16 and over, 55 ; bolts, tire, 
65 ; bolt ends, 55 ; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 
and 10 ; machine screws, 70 ; plough 
bolts, 55 ; square nuts, case lots, 3 ; 
square nuts, small lots, 2\ ; hex nuts, 
case lots, 3 ; hex nuts, smaller lots, 
24 p.c. 

RIVETS— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows since the recent advance in the 

36 



price of copper rivets: Iron, discounts, 
60 and 10 p.c; copper, No. 8, 37c; cop- 
per, No. 10, 40c; copper, No. 12, 43c 

COIL CHAIN.— Prices have been re- 
vised the general effect being an ad- 
vance. Quotations now are: \ inch 
$7.00; 5-16, $5.35;%, $4.75; 7-16,$4.50; 
4, $4.25; 9-16, $4.20; f, $4.25; f, $4.10. 

SHOVELS — Discounts on spades and 
shovels continue 40 and 5 p.c. 

HARVEST TOOLS — Discounts con- 
tinue as before, 60 and 5 per cent. 

AXE HANDLES— Quoted as follows : 
Turned, s.g. hickory, doz., $3.15 ; No. 1, 
$1.90 ; No. 2, $1.60 ; octagon, extra, 
$2.30 ; No. 1, $1.60. 

AXES. — Quotations are: Bench axes, 
40; broad axes, 25 p.c. dis. off list; Roy- 
al Oak, per dozen, $6.25; Maple Leaf, 
$8.25 ; Model, $8.50 ; Black Prince, 
$7.25 ; Black Diamond, $9.25 ; Standard 
Hint edge, $8.75 ; Copper King, $8.25 ; 
Columbian, $9.50 ; handled axes, North 
Star, $7.75 ; Black Prince, $9.25 ; Stan- 
dard flint edge, $10.75 ; Copper King, 
$11 per dozen. 

BUTTS— The discount on wrought iron 
butts is 70 p.c 

CHURNS — The discounts from list 
continue as before : 45 and 5 per cent. ; 
but the list has been advanced and is 
now as follows : No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; 
No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, $11 ; No. 4, $13 ; 
No. 5, $16. 

CHISELS— Quoted at 70 p.c off list 
prices. 

AUGER BITS— Discount on "Irwin" 
bits is 474 per cent., and on other lines 
70 per cent. 

BLOCKS— Discount on steel blocks is 
35 p.c off list prices ; on wood, 55 p.c. 

FITTINGS— Discounts continue as fol- 
lows : Wrought couplings, 60 ; nipples, 
65 and 10 ; T's and elbows, 10 ; malle- 
able bushings, 50 ; malleable unions, , 55 
p.c. 

GRINDSTONES— As noted last week, 
the price is now 14c per lb., a decline 
of \c. 

FORK HANDLES— The discount is 40 
p.c from list prices. 

HINGES— The discount on light "T" 
and strap hinges is 65 p.c. off list 
prices. 

HOOKS— Prices are quoted as follows: 
Brush hooks, heavy, per doz., $8.75 ; 
grass hooks, $1.70. 

CLEVISES— Price is now 64c per lb. 

STOVE PIPES— Quotations are as 
follows : 6-inch, per 100 feet length, 
$9 ; 7-inch, $9.75. 

DRAW KNIVES— The discount is 70 
per cent, from list prices. 

RULES— Discount is 50 per cent. 

WASHERS— On small quantities the 
discount is 35 p.c. ; on full boxes it is 
40 p.c. 

WRINGERS — Prices have been ad- 
vanced $2 per dozen, and quotations are 
now as follows : Royal Canadian, 
$35.00; B.B., $39.75, per dozen. 

FILES— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows : Arcade, 75 ; Black Diamond, 60 ; 
Nicholson's, 624 p.c. 

BUILDING PAPER — Prices are as 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 



Winnipeg Paint — Glass C 



o. 

Limited 



Warehouses 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



WINNIPEG 



Our sample books of BAS-KA-INO— (something new in 
wall hangings — standard colors) and LIIN-UINA <a high-class 
colored tapestry burlap — all colors), sized and oil-coated bur- 
laps will be out in a few days. We would like to mail you 
one of these. Send us your orders. 



•» 



follows : Plain, Joliette, 40c. ; Cyclone, 
55c. ; Anchor, 55c. ; pure fibre, 60c. ; 
tarred, Joliette, 65c. ; Cyclone, 80c. , 
Anchor, 65c. ; pure fibre, 80c. 

TINWARE, ETC.— Quoted as follows: 
Pressed, retinned, 70 and 10 ; pressed, 
plain, 75 and 2£ ; pieced, 30 ; japanned 
ware, 37£ ; enamelled ware, Famous, 
50 ; Imperial, 50 and 10 ; Imperial, one 
coat, 60 ; Premier, 50 ; Colonial, 50 
and 10 ; Royal, 60 ; Victoria, 45 ; white 
45 ; Diamond, 50 ; Granite, 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED WAKE. — The dis- 
count on pail is now 37 4 per cent.; 
and mi other galvanized lines the dis- 
count is .'ill per cent . 

CORDAGE— We quote: Rope, sisal, 7- 
16 and larger, basis, $11.25; Manila, 7-16 
and larger, basis, $16.25 ; Lathyarn, 
$11.25 ; cotton rope, per lb., 21c. 

SOLDER— Quoted at 27c. per pound. 
Block tin is quoted at 45c. per pound. 

VISES — Prices are quoted as fol- 
lows : "Peter Wright," 30 to 34, 144c; 
35 to 39, 14c; 48 and larger, 13Ac per 
lb. 

ANVILS— "Peter Wright" anvils are 
selling at Lie. per lb. 

CROWBARS— Quoted now at 4c per 
lb. 

POWER HORSE CLIPPERS - The 
"1902" power horse clipper is selling 
at $12, and the "Twentieth Century" 
at $6. The "1904" sheep shearing ma- 
chines are sol 1 at $13.60. 

AMMUNITION, ETC.— Quotations are 
as follows: Cartridges, Dominion R.F. 
50 and 5 ; Dominion, C.F., 33£ 
C.F., pistol, p.c; C.F., mili- 

tary, 10 p.c. advance. Loaded 
shells : Dominion Eley's and Kynoch's 
soft, 12 gauge, black, $16-.50; chilled, 12 
gauge, $17.50; soft, 10 gauge, $19.50; 
chilled, 10 gauge, $20.50. Shot, ordin- 
ary, per 100 lbs., $7.25; chilled, $7.75; 
powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton, $4.75 ; 
F.F.G., Dupont's, $5. 

IRON AND STEEL— Quotations are: 
Bar iron basis, $2.70. Swedish 
iron basis, $4.95; sleigh shoe stee', 
$2.75 ; spring steel, $3.25 ; machinery 
steel, $3.50 ; tool steel, Black Diamond, 
100 lbs., $9.50 ; Jessop. $13. 

SHEET ZINC — The price is now 
$8.50 for cask lots, and $9 for broken 
lots. 

PIG' LEAD— Quoted a $5.85 per cwt. 

AXLE GREASE— "Mica" axle grease 
is quoted at $2.75 per case, and "Dia- 
mond" at $1.60. 

IRON PIPE AND FITTINGS— Re- 



vised prices are as follows:- Black pipe, 
'., inch, $2.65 ; %, $2.80; ft, $3.50; %, 

$4.40; 1, $6.35; 1' ,, $8.65; l 1 ., $10.40; 
2, 13.85; 2i/ 2 , $19.00; 3, $25.00. Gal- 
vanized iron pipe, % inch. $3.75; yj, 
$4.35; %, $5.65; 1, $8.10; iy 4 , $11.00; 
1%, $13.25; 2, inch, $17.65. Nipples, 
discounts 70 and 10 per cent.; Unions, 
couplings; bushings and plugs, 60 per 
cent. 

LEAD PIPE— The price, $7.80, is 
firmly maintained in view of the ad- 
vancing lead market. 

GALVANIZED IRON— Quoted as 
follows :— Apollo, 16 gauge, $3.90 ; 
18 and 20, $4.10 ; 22 and 24, 
$4.45; 26, $4.40; 28, $4.65, 30 gauge or 
10% oz., $4.95; Queen's Head, 24, $4.50; 
26, $4.65; 28, $5.00. 

TIN PLATES— We now quote as fol- 
lows : IC charcoal, 20 x 28, .box, $9.50; 
tX charcoal, 20 x 28, $LL50; XXI char- 
coal, 20 x 28, $13.50. 

TERNE PLATES— Quoted at $9. 

CANADA PLATES— Quoted • as fol- 
lows: Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24, 
$3.40; 20 x 28, $3.65; full polished, $4.15. 

BLACK SHEETS— Prices are : 10 to 
16 gauge, 100 lbs., $3.50; 18 to 22, 
$3.75; 24, $3.90; 26, $4: 28, $4.10. 

PETROLEUM AND GASOLINE.— 
Silver Star in brls. per gal., 20c; Sun- 
light in brls, per gal., 21c; per case, 
$2.30; Eocene in brls, per gal., 23c; per 
ease, $2.50; Pennoline in brls., per gal., 
24c; Crystal Spray, 23c; Silver Light, 
21c; Engine gasoline in barrels, per 
gal.. 28c. f.oh. Winnipeg' in cases. $2.75 

PAINTS, OILS & TURPENTINE — 
Turpentine is firm at the recent advance 
White lead, pure, $7; bladder puttr in 
barrels, 2|c; in kegs, 33c; turpentine, 
barrel lots. Winnipeg, $1.01; Calgary, 
$1.08; Lethbridge, $1.08; Edmon- 
ton, $1.09. Less than barrel lots 
5c. ner srallon advance. Linseed oil, 
raw. Winnipeg;. R4«.: Oalg-ary, 71c: 
Lethhridg-e. 71c: Edmonton. 72c: boiled 
oil. 3c per g-al. advancp on these prices. 

WTNDDW GLASS— Wp quote : 16-oz. 
O.G.. sing-le. in 50-ft. boxes— 16 to 25 
united inches. $2.25: 26 to 40. $2.40: 
I6-07. O G . sinele. in 100-ft. cases — 
16 to ?5 nnifpf) inebps. $4: 26 to 40 
$4.52: 41 to 50. $4.75: 50 to 60. $5 25- 
61 to 70. $5.75 21-oz. C.S.. double, in 
100-ft. cases— 26 to 40 united inchps. 
$7.35: 41 to 50. $8.40: 51 to 60. $0 45- 
61 to 70. $10.50: 71 to 80. $11.55: 87 to 
85. .4:12.60: Pfi to QO $14 75- 01 to 05 
$17.30. 

37 




SUPERB EMPIRE 

The Perfect Cooker 

We draw the attention of the Western Trade to the 
Superb Empire Planished Steel Range. The oven 
door is not only braced but also spring balanced. A 
lever is attached to the front key-plate to raise it as de- 
sired, and contrived also to hold it up if necessary. The 
Superb throughout is substantial, its nickel dress alone 
making it a ready seller, besides, it is made by a West 
ern stove factory for Western people only. 

The Western Stove Makers 

ff^ ^MANUFACTURERS OTJ^j 



DAVID REID & CO. 



Hardware Commission Merchants 



Room 22 Stanley Block, - Winnipeg, Man. 



Correspondence is solicited from 
manufacturers wishing a represen- 
tative in Winnipeg and the North 
West. 



We ha»t sub-agents 
throughout Western Canada 



BEST OF REFERENCES 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



YEAR'S TRADE REVIEWED. 

Whan Hardware and Metal's young 
man called upon George E. l»a\i> 
retary-treasurer of Frothingham & 
Workman, wholesale hardware mer 
chants ol Montreal, he Found him im- 
mersed in a mass ol papers which he 
explained weie the day's ordj 

In repi.\ to the questions as to the 
prospoi l!<07, judging from the ex 

perience oi the pas! vea . Mr. Davis 
replied. "The end of this present pros 
peri t j does not yet seem to be in sigfal 
and with the swing trade now das 
there is no reason to anticipate a let 
tip. Reports from all parts of 
eountry are uniform as 
to the bountiful crops. Mann 
facturers also are busy and are 
using large quantities of goods and sup- 
lilies in the hardware line. Collections 
have been easy during the past year, 
showing that money is circulating- Eree 
l.v- 

•■ How about prices V 

'•There has been a steady advance 
in prices, and this not alone in lines 
of hardware into which iron chiefly 
enters, hut also handles, leather, and 
rope am! such goods. During an ad- 
vancing market there is generally less 
cutting of the prices and trade has in 
consequence. been very satisfactory. 
The most remarkable thing, however, to 
note in connection with advancing 
prices is that consumption has not ap- 
parently been checked. There seems 
no limit to the ability of the country 
to consume goods of all kinds. It has 
been very difficult to secure some lines 
of standard goods, more particularly 
in the iron line. During all the year 
it has been almost impossible for a job- 
ber to complete his stock again < ace 
it was broken." 

"Do you find help hard to obtain ?" 

"Well. yes. There is more or less 
difficulty, we have several openings now. 
There's not much help of an intelligent 
class offering. This must he another re- 
sult of the present prosperity, for boys 
are generally kept longer at school dur- 
ing good times. Hardware and metal 
■ I — not seem to have much difficulty 
getting smart fellows." said Mr. Davis, 
as he shook hands and said good-bye. 



BIG AMALGAMATION. 

Although details are not yet avail- 
able we can announce that arrange- 
ments are under way for the amalgama- 
tion or absorption of the Ontario Tack 
Company, Hamilton, by the Canada 
■ Company, of the same city. The 
Ontario Tack Company recently pur- 
id the wire nail machinery of the 
Ontario Lead and Wire Company. To- 
ronto, and has a large interest in the 
Western Wire Xail Works, at London. 
The amalgamation of these interests 
with the Canada Screw Co., which has 
branches at Toronto. Vancouver and 
other places, js an important event in 
the hardware trade, and may help con- 
siderably in the movement now under 
way to bring wire nails back to the pro- 
fitable prices ruling prior to the price 
cutting war of the past two y< 



TRAVELERS TO MEET. 

'I'he Canadian Fairbanks Company's 
staff oi salesmen covering the territorj 
between Montreal and Vancouver will 
hold a convention in Toronto next week, 
the headquarters being at the firm's new 
building on front street west. Trips 
of inspection will be made of the Can 
adian Fairbanks-Morse factory in To 
ronto, the I niol] Drawn Steel plant at 
Hamilton, the Bertram Works at Dun 
d.is. and other plants for which the 
company are sole selling agents. 



An increased business is looked for 

'.'MI7. 



McCLARY TRAVELERS CHANGES. 
The McClary Manufacturing Cutipauy 
have made a number of changes in their 

staff, to take effeel at the end of this 
year. George Clarke, who has heen rep- 
resent intr the firm in the western dis 
trict. has heen transferred to llaiii'lton, 
where he will be branch manager. Al- 
exander Clarke, manager al Hamilton, 
will come to London, to be i •■m'eeted 
with the company's sales department. 
C. Smith, who has been traveling for 
the Montreal branch. !ias 1 n trans- 
ferred to London to cover the territory 
heretofore in charge of George Clarke. 



WEST INDIAN TRADE. 

Pickford & Lack. Halifax, N.S., have 
offered to conduct four representatives 
from Canada to the British West Indies 
for the object of increasing Canadian 
trade there. J. D. Allen will represent 
the Toronto Board of Trade: A. K. 
Jones, Halifax Board of Trade; H. B. 
Schofield, St. John Board of Trade. 
Montreal has not yet elected its dele- 
gale. The party will go on January 15, 
and be away thirty-eight days. All 
Canadian manufacturers' catalogues 
will be taken care of by A. E. Jones. 
Halifax. 



HARDWARE ASSOCIATION ITEMS. 

Owing to the illness of his wife, E. 
P. Paulin, Goderich, was not able to 
attend the meeting of the Executive 
Committee in Toronto on Monday. 

W. G. Scott. Mt. Forest, was also un- 
able to attend, owing to his being: a 
candidate for re-election as Water Com- 
missioner of his town. 

The members present were : President 
Humphries, Vice-President TTambly, 
Secretary Wrigley. Treasurer Caslor 
and Messrs. Brocklebank, Taylor and 
Peart. 

J. Walton Peart. St. Mary's, leaves 
this month on an extended trip to the 
Southern States on account of his 
wife's health. Mrs. Peart is recovering: 
from her recent attack of typhoid fever. 



SEASON'S SKATE TRADE. 
J. S. Bowbanks, Toronto, represent- 
ative of the Stan Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Halifax, VS., states that the 
business done in 1906 showed a larg:e 
increase on 1005. While a g:reat manv 
dealers had skates left over from 1905, 
it is evident that very little stock will 
he carried over this season. Mr. Bow- 
banks travels from Halifax to Vancou- 
besides every two years taking: a 
trip to the Old Country, he being: the 
first to sell hockey skates and sticks in 
Knerland and Scotland where Starr 
s'<ates have obtained a firm foothold. 

38 



A GOOD INCREASE. 
Mr. Patterson, of the Patterson Man- 
ufacturing Company, Toronto, reports 

a very brisk year for their products, 

building paoer, tar Celt, wire edge, . 
ready roofing, etc. The increase over 
1905 was about 15 per cent., but he 
looks for a much larger increase tor 



SEASONABLE SUGGESTIONS. 

Push ice-scrapers and snow-shovels 
this month but set a good example by 
keeping your sidewalks clear. Show 

that you believe in using the goods you 
sell. 



THOS. DAVIDSON CO.'S BANQUET. 

The 10th annual banquet tendered b\ 
the President and Directors of the Tims. 
I lavidson Manufacturing Company, to 
their travellers, office staff, and heads 
of departments, on December 28, was 
thoroughly enjoyed by all the partici- 
pants. The function was held in the 
club rooms provided for the employees, 
in the immediate vicinity of the fac- 
tory. 

Owing to the unavoidable absence of 
Mr. Jas. Davidson, the chair was taken 
by T. C. Davidson, the Vice-President. 
The first toast of the evening was "The 
King," which was right loyally honor- 
ed. ' The toast to "Our Travellers," 
was then proposed by E. Goodwill, who 
referred to the enormous increase in 
Canadian trade during the last 25 
years. W. H. Morgan, (Central On- 
tario), and Geo. Mather (B.C.), 
replied on behalf of the "Knights of 
the Grip." J. N. Young proposed the 
"Office Staff and Ware Room," which 
drew forth a very interesting reply from 
A. Bindley. W. J, White'; K.C., pro- 
posed the "Winnipeg Branch," and 
was followed by J. Taylor Webb, the 
western manager, who spoke in his 
usual happy vein. The next toast was 
"Heads of Departments," proposed by 
T. C. Davidson, and replied to by 
Messrs. M. Lachapelle and Jos. Bod- 
fish. The next toast was "The Ladies," 
proposed by C. D. Koppell, and replied 
to by T. R. Davidson, on behalf of the 
fair sex. The toast "Canada," was 
proposed by R. B. Cray, and replied to 
by H. B. Chadburn, both of these gen- 
tlemen representing parts of the Pro- 
vince of Ontario. After the health of 
the President and Directors had heen 
enthusiastically drunk, the evening was 
brought to a close with the singing of 
the National Anthem. 

Those who contributed with songs or 
recitations included Dr. W. A. TTaldi- 
mand; Messrs. Jas. Chalmers, C. P. 
Clarke, A. 0. Cee, II. Brisson. W. John- 
ston, J. O'Dowd. and W. E. Barrat. 
The item contributed by Jas. Chalmers, 
(who also designed the invitation cards 
and menus, which, as usual, were litho- 
graphed on tin), was particularly hu- 
morous, being an original poem with 
local hits, which was thoroughly en- 
joyed. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS 

When sending catalogues for review, manu- 
facturers would confer a favor by pointing out 
the new articles that they contain. It would 
assist the editor in writing the review. 

By mentioning II midwakk ami Miial to 
flhow that the writer is in the tr.i<l<\ u oqpj <»f these 
catalogues or other i.rinti-d mutter will be Bent liy 
the firms whose addresses are given. 



Forty Year's Growth. 

The Sherwin-Williams Company, paint 
iiiaiui I'nit m <• i -. Montreal, have issued 
a. pamphlet cnlii led " Fortj Year's 
(irowtli." with miniature cuts of their 
plant in L866, an,l of their various large 
concerns of the present Way, including 
five large plants in Cleveland, Chicago, 
Montreal, Newark ami London, Eng., 
also their offices and warehouses in fif- 
teen principal cities, scattered from the 

Atlantic i>> Pacific Ocean, ami from 
Winnipeg to the Gulf, which demon 
strates (he great growth of this firm in 

that space of lime. 

Novel Souvenir. 
Dorken Bros. & Company, of Mont- 
realj manufacturer's agents for II. 
Bokers cV Company, Tree Brand cut- 
lery, have issued a Very acceptable little 

Bolder wishing the trade A Happy New 
Near. In the centre is a miniature 
sketch of the Alps, with a sample sprig 
of a small flower called "Edeliwiss," 
which is much sought after by Alpine 
travellers, and grows only in the Alps 
ami Pyrenees, at a great altitude in sit- 
uations difficult of access. 



Standard Paint Catalogue. 
The Standard Paint and Varnish 
Company of Windsor, are sending out 
a. new catalogue of about 5 1-2 x 8 
inches, containing 50 pages fully illus- 
trated, with the products manufactured 
by them. On the front page are cuts 
of the present officers of this company. 
including Jas. A. Strait h, President, and 
general manager; Albert Stolf, factory 
manager; D. B. Fisher, secretary antl 
assistant manager, Win. Richards, sup- 
erintendent dry color department , Wm. 
Dietzel, superintendent vanish depart- 
ment. Also a cut of Ludger Gravel, the 
hustling manufacturers' agent, who rep- 
resents the Standard Paint & Varnish 
Company in Montreal. 

Homes, Healthful and Beautiful. 

Under the above caption, the Alabas- 
tme Co.. of Paris, Ontario, have put 
out, probably one of the handsomest 
booklets on home decoration ever issued 
in Canada. While designed primarily a 
a catalogue, the hook is handsomely il- 
lustrated with numerous cuts of the in 
teriors of rooms in colors, and, as well 
as containing complete information on 
wall decoration, i -, tilled with many 
valuable suggestions both pictorial and 
otherwise on tasteful home furnishing. 
It is a book which needs only to be 
scon to be appreciated. 

"Homes. Healthful ami Beautiful," is 
gotten out in the form of an edition de 



fiftEPROOF 




Windows 



THAT 
ARE j, 
FIRE-PROOF 



These windows in a fire-proof 
building, complete the security, 
and in any building will thor- 
oughly prevent the spread and 
advancement of the fiercest 
flames. 

Better than iron shutters 
(even if they happened to be 
closed at the needed time) ; fire- 
proof glass remains intact, re- 
sisting both the intense heat of 
the fire and the action of water. 



1 



Many practical tests have 
proved it's efficiency. 

Used in conjunction with our 
hollow sheet-metal frames and 
other fire-proof fittings, it gives 
the most perfect protection 
available. 

It's adoption lessens insurance 
rates. 

If you want to know more 
about "fire-proof windows," 
write us, it's an interesting 
subject. 

. . . THE . . . 

Metallic Roofing Co., 

TORONTO, Canada. L,,v " TED ' 




Western Canada Factory, 797 Notre Dame Ave., Winnipeg, Man. 



luxe, and it is too expensive a book to 
distribute promiscuously to everyone 
who might write for it merely 
ly out of idle curiosity. The 

Alabastine Company are therefore 
making a charge of ten cents for it, 
which amount, while not nearly cover- 
ing the cost of the book, is intended to 
discourage those who would write for 
it mcreh to gratify an idle whim. It 
is well worth reading. A copy will be 
mailed to any address on receipt of ten 
cents. 



Foundry Supplies. 

The Catalogue of the Hamilton, Out.. 
Facing Mills Company, has been sent 
out to the trade. This catalogue is of 
ti x !) inches, containing 80 pages, fully 

illustrated, of their products of foundry 
supplies, including brushes, sieves, and 
moulders tools, bellows, shovels, cray- 
ons, also foundry lacings, foundrj equip- 
ments, graphite ami plumbago. .It will 
be found useful to hardware merchants, 
in i rdering supplies. 

3 ft 



Catchy Advertising. 
The enterprising linn of James 
Ixeid, hardware, harness, wall paper and 
paint merchants of Perth, <>nt., have 
supplied their customers with a hand- 
some calendar, showing a young lady 
and a young man. The linn uses the 
following catchy bit of prose: 

• ' A fellow loves a girl. 

That *s his husim 
A gill lo\ es a fellow. 

That 's her business, 
They get married and need hardware, 

That "s i ui' business. 



Blacksmith's Supplies. 
Ludger Gravel, agent for blacksmith's 
supplies, Montreal, has issued a hand- 
some pastel of a blacksmith surrounded 
by his tools, and dressed in the regalia 
of his profession. This paste] is very 
attractive, ami will be given a promin- 
ent place by any customer fortunate 
enough to receii e a copy. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDRY AND METAL 
INDUSTRIES 



The Shipway Iron. Bell and Wire 

Company, of Toronto, are considering 

the moving <>\ their plant to Niagara 

Kails. 

A British patent recently issued to 1 
M. G ruber of Berlin, Germany, for an 
aluminum solder, contains 60 parts of 
tin. ■_'.") parts of zinc. L0 parts of cop- 
per, • > parts of cadmium and 2 parts of 
aluminum. 

The K. A. Pflueger Company, recent- 
ly incorporated at Akron. Ohio, lor the 
manufacture of fishing tackle and reels. 
will install a complete plating and pol- 
ishing plant, and later will put in a 
brass foundry. 

Percival Plow and Stove Com- 
pany have organized at Merrickville 
with the following officers: -I. B. Wad- 
dell, President: B. ( '. Percival. Vice- 
President; E. W. Stickney, managing 
director and (i. S. Seeber, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

The International Acheson Graphite 
Company of Niagara Palls, N.V.. are 
now manufacturing a soft artificial 
graphite which may he used for elec- 
trotyping, lubrication and stove polish. 
A new discovery by E. G. Acheson has 
made this possible. 

The Nova Scotia Steel Company dur- 
November shipped from North Syd- 
ney 69,304 tons of coal, or an increase 
over the same period last year of 10.- 
195 tons. For the 11 months up to No- 
vember 30, 612,020 tons have been ship- 
ped, as against 487. odd Ions, or an in- 
■ over last year's shipments of 
124,453. 

A despatch from Glace Bay says: 
Everything now indicates that the tire 
iii the Hub colliery is out. The tempera- 
ture of the mine at t lie bottom of the 
main shaft is under 100 degrees, and 
a: two other places only 40 and 60 de- 
The Dominion Coal Company 
an- determined to be on the safe side, 
however, and the Atlantic will continue 
to poor into the mine for several days. 
Several powerful pumps have been or- 
dered, and are now on the way to (ilace 
Bay. A> soon as they arrive the com- 
pany will stait to pump the mine out. 



MAKING SOLDERING FLUX. 
Chloride of zinc is very extensively 

used us a flux in soft Boldering. It is 
an excellent one. ion. and nothing has 
vet been found to lake its place. It 
also has the advantage of cheapness. 
The action of chloride of zinc in sol- 
dering is based upon the fact that it 
dissolves the oxides of tin and lead 
upon the solder, and produces a clean 
surface for uniting with the metal to 
soldered. 



Start the year right. 

If you have never handled paint start 
\ 907 right by establishing a paint department 
in your store. The opportunities for profit- 
able paint business are so good that no dealer 
should neglect this source of splendid revenue. 

If you have never handled SHERWIN- 

Williams Paints and Varnishes, start right 

by becoming a Sherwin-Williams Agent. You 
do not know the paint possibilities before you 
until you have handled this line. With the 
S-W. prestige, quality and reputation behind 
you, and our co-operation with you in getting 
business you make sales where you did not 
suppose sales could be made. The S-W. sell- 
ing methods and advertising helps are strong 
and effective and are a surprise to the new 
agent who has never experienced such efforts 
to create business for him. 

Write today for our agency proposition. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant: 639 Centre Street, Montreal, Que. 
Warehouses: 86 York Street, Toronto; 147 Bannatyne Street, East, 
Winnipeg, Man. 



The mistake that is frequently made 
in making soldering flux is to add water. 
The stronger the (lux can be made, and 
still remain in the liquid condition, the 
better it will be. As it is the chloride 
of zinc that does the work, the presence 
of water is a detriment. The water 
also has the advantage of producing 
spattering. The action of a weak flux 
in cleaning the surface of the molten 
solder is far inferior to that of a strong 
solution. In order to produce the best 

m suits, the (lux should be made by dis- 
solving zinc in strong muriatic acid un- 
til it will lake up no more. 

VALUE OF BABBITT METAL. 

Babbitt metal is a composition (hat 
is used extensively as a substitute for 
brass in the lining of journal bearings, 
says the Valve World. To make such a 
bearing, the shall for which 

it is required is placed in 

position in its recess or cavtiy, 
and then the melted babbitt metal 
is poured in around it and allowed to 
cool, thus forming the bearing for the 
40 



shaft. The value of babbitt metal for 
this purpose lies in the fact that it has 
all the merits of brass as a wearing 
material, and at the same time melts at 
a much lower temperature; and also 
being of a very fluid nature when mel- 
ted, if may he poured into the cavities 
around the shaft and the expensive 
operation of fitting brass to these places 
thus be dispensed with. What is called 
the "genuine," or superior babbitt 
metal is described under the heading of 
Tin Alloys. lint (here are a variety of 
cheaper grades of (his material, in 
which lead is very extensively used al- 
loyed with antimony, or with antimony 
and tin. While these compositions are 
not so good as the "genuine." they are 
of sufficient merit for a large variety 
of cheap machinery, ami are extensive 

ly used in the repairing of agricultural 

implements, and other grades of cheap 

machinery. An immense quantity of 

the combination of lead and antimony 

is produced by the silver smelters, a 
market for which is found in the pro- 
duction of babbit! metal. 



CANADA PLATES 

Galvanized 

Polished 

Half Bright 

Stock \\i> Import. 



A.C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL 



HAND DRILLING MACHINERY 



We have the best that 
money can buy. 

Our cheaper grades are all 
good serviceable machines. 

The best value In the mar- 
ket whether you want the 
cheap or the dear kind. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 

NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co. 



WRIT! US FOR 

PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLAGE 

NEW YORK CITY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Mantels, 
Grates, 
Tile, etc. 

A Nice Mantel 
is a fine piece 
of Furniture. 



Batty Stove and Hardware Co. 

182 Adelaide Street West, TORONTO 




ii 



MIDLAND 



n 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Laic* Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ 



Orummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



IIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



.FULL STOCK... 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO, 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO. ONT 

ST. JOHNS. QUE . 



THREE LEADERS 

LEEDS FIRE CLA Y CO., Ltd. 

Unsurpassed Fire Bricks, Stable Bricks, 

T.' JO WITT & SONS, SHEFFIELD 

Files, Cast Steel Hammers and Crucible 
Steel. Price not more than other brands. 
Quality considerably more. 

LET US TELL YOU ABOUT IT 

JOS. FENTON & SONS, SHEFFIELD 

Cutlery and Plated Ware. No better made- 
Style, durability and price to suit. 

WRITE TO-DAY FOR CATALOGUE 

Agent for 

Norway Iron, Steel, Calvanized Iron, Ohalno. 

Shoot Iron, Hoop Iron, Maohlnery 

Stool, PEN-DAR Metal Locker*. 

H. G. EADIE 

22 St. John St., - Montreal 

Manufactunt'i Agont, Hardware and MatalMitchant 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u.i»< 

NEW OLASOOW, M.S. 

ManufHcturom of ^ ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMBNS-MARTIH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Perfectly Flat Galvanized Sheets 

Is a marked characteristic of 

GILBERTSONX^ 

comet™* 15 ' 

Brand 
Sold by all jobbers who are up-to-date. 
It sells readily, is selected carefully ; soft and 

mooth. Prices lower than other high-grade 

brands. 

MAKERS I 

W. GILBERTSON & CO., Limited, 

PONTARDAWE. SOUTH WALES 

Agent: Alex. Gibb, 13 St. John St., Montreal. 



OAKEY'S 






The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6d. and If. Canlaton 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mi, London, England 

Agent: 
JOHN FORMAN, • 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^~^ 

Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

LimlUd. 
HAMILTON, ONT 



41 



HARDWARE AND METAU 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Glass 
Company 
of Canada 
Limited 



Import 



Window 



Glass 



LOWEST PRICES 
ASK FOR THEM 



Write Nearest Office 



TORONTO 
MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



Building and Industrial News 

ii.\ri>» mi im'Mitat, would be pleased to reoeire from any authorltatire source building and industrial news 
of any sort, the format ion or in establishment or enlargement of mills, 

factories, foundries 01 other works, railway 01 mining Dews. All correspondence will be 
treated us confidential when desired. 



A tannery is being- established at. 
Sydney, N.S. 

'Hie Red River Metal Company will 
erect a Large warehouse in Winnipeg, 
i«. cos! .+ 12.(l00. 

The building returns of < ialgary and 

suburbs, for the year L906, will be in 

th, vicinity of $3,000,000. 

The building permits issued in Van- 
couver for L906, total $4,084,840, which 

is more than double those of two years 

ago. 

Gordon Mackay & Company, of To- 
ronto, have been issued a permit for 
In erection of their new factory at a 
cost of $60,000, 

F. C. Filer, of the Northern Electric 
& Manufacturing Company, of Mont- 
real, is establishing a branch of his 
company in Winnipeg. 

The Burlington Masonic Hall Com- 
pany, has been incorporated with a 
share cpaital of $10,000 for the erection 
« f a hall for the Burlington Masonic 
Lodge; 

The sum of $000,000 has been sub- 
scribed in Quebec for the starting of 
a. cement industry. The land has been 
purchased, and works will be started 
immediately. 

The contract for erecting the Meisel 
Manufacturing Company's new plant 
at Port Arthur has been awarded and 
work will be commenced on the build- 
ings at once. 

Another industry has been located at 
Welland, by John* A Reeb, of Port Col- 
borne, and W. J. Sommervile of Wel- 
land, who will manufacture wood fibre 
wall piaster, and cement tile. 

A new $100,000 hotel is to be built at 
Si. Johns. Newfoundland. All the stock 
is held by Newfoundland parties, excep- 
ting two Canadian commercial men, 
Messrs. R. Taylor, of Halifax, and L. 
Garneau, of Quebec. 

The Great Northern Kail way has an- 
nounced ;i new freight tariff, effective 
December 27, making voluntary reduc- 
tion in rates from the south to Winni- 
peg, Portage la Prairie. Brandon, Prince 
Albert and Edmonton. 

The Winnipeg Foundry Company, 
has been incorporated with a $20,000 
capital; provisional directors: J. T. Hill, 
machinist ; H. Hell, machinist ; W. A. 
Armstrong, agent ; A. I >. Irish, agent ; 
A. .1. Brown, agent, and F. W. Trisb. 
manager, all of Winnipeg. 

The Well Machine and Wind Mill 
Company, has been incorporated with 

$20,000 ' capita] ; provisional directors: 
42 



C. B. Tyrrell, merchant; J. II. Inkster, 

agent; 11. W. 1 1 ul chinson, manager; W. 
S. Evans, financial agent; .1. A. Mach- 
ray, barrister-at-law, all of Winnipeg. 

Montreal shows a large increase in 
the number of buildings erected, also 
total value. Permits for new buildings 
in 1906 are 1,484, as compared with 
1,145 for 1905. The value ..f buildings 
for 1906 is $7,745,023, compared with 
$4,779,380, for 190f), an increase of 
$2,965,643. 

Bechtels, Limited, has been incorpor- 
ated with a share capital of $75,000, for 
the purpose of manufacturing brick, 
file blocks, and cement products. The 
head office will be at Waterloo, and pro- 
visional diiectors will he: B. E. Bech- 
tel. W. B. Beehtel, W. J. Watson, C. E. 
Whyard of Waterloo; C. H. Beehtel, of 
Berlin, and P. A. Watson, of Call. 

The Sydney Cement Company have 
decided to enlarge their plant, which is 
situated on ground leased by them from 
the Dominion Iron & Steel Company, 
between two railroads, a position of con- 
siderable advantage for deliveries of 
raw material and for shipment of its 
products. The cement is made from slag 
which is procured from the blast fur- 
naces of the Dominion Iron & Steel 
Company. 

The first gypsum plaster ever made in 
Winnipeg, was turned out last week. 
by the Manitoba Gypsum Company, at 
their new works. The company first 
built works on Lake Manitoba, 
they were burnt down in July last, and 
it was decided to erect a new factory 
at Winnipeg, and to take the rock there 
for treatment. About 70 hands are now 
employed, and work will continue all 
the year round. 

The Ontario Wind Engine & Pump 
Company, shipped, on December 26, a 
consignment of 15 Airinotor Outfits to 
Egypt, This follows other large ship- 
ments made last summer and fall, ami 
these shipments speak loduer than 
words of the popularity of these Cana- 
dian manufacturei s in the Levant, It 
also emphasizes the wisdom of main- 
taining a reasonable protected tariff to 
enable Canadian manufacturers to build 
up i ii .1 only a home business, but also 
an export business, for if the manufac- 
turers of this country are not protected 
they neither can manufacture for the 
home trade nor for export. The_ Cana- 
dian Airmotors now to be seen in Cy- 
pi us. Egypt, Africa, and other distant 
pails of the world are the best testi- 
mony io Canadian Statesmanship. 

Tn Toronto, during 1906. the building 
permits issued represented the sum of 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



$13,152,000. Las! year the amount was 
$10,370,000. Application Cor the cbn- 
st ruction of several large buildings have 
recently been received, bul the permits 
have nui been issued. Among these 

arc tlic Public l.ibrarx ami the I mi 

ion Radiator Company s works, The 
former is $242,000 and the latter $500, 
000. These, if issued, would bring the 
amount up to $13,894,000. The number 
of permits issued limine- |b t , year was 
3,438 and the buildings erected 4,709. 

Following is a list of the permits issued 

during the pasi ten years: L896, $657, 
168; L897, $947,6] 1 ; L898, $1,701,630; 
L899, $2,010,4 16; 1900, $1,903,136; 1901, 
$3,568,883'; L902, $3,854,923; L903, 
$4,356,457; 1904, $5,896,120; 1905, $10,- 
370,000. 

Calt has given substantial evidence 
in the way of growth by the erection 
of 112 dwelling houses. The manufac 

hiring pari of the town, has also shown 
a decided increase, some new firms start- 
ing, and a number of old ones adding 
considerable Moor space, .".1 1.710 square 
feet being added to 1"> enterprises, di- 
vided viz.: Call Knitting Company, 87,- 
500 s(|iiare feet; MacGregor, Gourlay 
Company, 84,845 square feet; Malleable 
Iron Company. 36,99] square Eeet; P. 
\Y. Gardiner & Son. 22,400 square feet; 
Sheldons, Limited. 21,000 square feet; 
R. McDo'ugall Company, 13,200 square 
feet; Gait Elobe Company, 10,360 square 
feet; Cowan & Company, 10,230 square 
feel : McVicker Engine Company, 
9,548 square feet: Box Factory, 4,950 
square feet; J. J. Stevens Company, 
4.100 square feet; Victoria Wheel 
Works, 3,600 square feet; Peter Hay 
Knife. 1,600 square feet. The total 
amount of money expended for build- 
ing purposes in Gait in 1906, was $560,- 
000. 

A well organized and energetic move- 
ment is on foot in the Maritime Pro- 
vinces to build up the steel shipbuild- 
ing industry. A statement summing 
up the argument in favor of a tonnage 
bonus on steel ships built in Canada 
was lately submitted to the Tariff 
Commission, and the Dominion Govern- 
ment has been memorialized to grant 
such a bonus on a basis of $6 per 
gross ton. The Boards 6t Trades and 
municipal councils of Halifax, Dart- 
mouth and other places have taken the 
matter up, and much interest is felt 
regarding the manner in which the 
request for a bonus will be treated at 
Ottawa. Years ago in Eastern Canada, 
shipbuilding assumed very large propor- 
tions, but with the advent of steel con- 
struction it rapidly declined. Steel 
vessels can be built cheaper in British 
yards on account of the cheaper iron, 
coal, and labor there Those who agi- 
tate for a bonus on steel ships point 
out that all maritime nations give pro- 
tection to their shipping. There is an 
increasing demand in Canada for steel 
vessels for both coastwise and lake 
trade, but it is claimed that Canadian 
yards cannot compete with British and 
foreign builders in this line of construc- 
tion. Tt is pointed out that Canadian 
built tonnage has decreased in less than 



30 years from 183,000 to 33,1 while 

the entries ill and out \'\- -ea have 

iased from m\ to sixteen mill 
the coastwise shipping frord ten to 
foi t \ fh e millions, and the I Ileal Lakes 

tonnage ba - i i ban doubled. There 

are now in Canada, besides several 
smaller firms, four large steel shipbuild- 
ing companies the Algoma Steel Com 

. Saul! Sic. Mane; the Canadian 

1 Furnace < lompanj . Mont real : t be 

Collingwood Shipbuilding Company, Col- 
lingwood; and the Canadian Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Toronto. These yards are 
not all fully and steadily employed, and 
it is suggested that while many millions 
id' dollars are being expended in Canada 
in nearly everj industry, including iron 
and steel, it is time we should, build our 
own ships and do our own carrying 
t rade. 

THE TALLEST BUILDING. 
Contracts have been awarded for the 

erection in New York City of what will 
be the tallest building in the world. 

This is the proposed new Singer build- 
ing on Broadway, north of Liberty 
Street. It will require for the work 

(i.OOO tons of structural steel. The build- 
ing' will have thirty-six regular floors, 
on top of which will be a dome includ- 
ing four floors, the fortieth floor being 
550 feet above the curb. This is a part 
of the transformation of a city into an 
abode of cliff-dwellers. The building 
will be 625 feet high, the tallest sky- 
scraper in the city, and will have wind 
anchors so that it may be (irmly braced 

against every gale. The wind pressure, 
on account of the structure's great al- 
titude, will be tremendous, and for that 
reason the building is to be literally 
tied to its foundations by an ingenious 
arrangement of steel rods. They will 
be three and a half inches in diameter, 
and descend for nearly fifty feet info 
the concrete which forms the caissons 
resting on solid rod. eighty-five feet 
below the curb. The lowest rod has on 
the end of if a great anchor plate to 
which it is secured. 



LATEST CANADIAN PATENTS. 

The following up-to-date list of Cana- 
dian patents is reported to us by Eger 
ton b'. Case, Solicitor of Patents, Tem- 
pi) Building, Toronto. 

Rob. A. Armstrong, Avenmore, Cut.. 

ploughs. Richard II. Castle, Toronto, 
Out., oven doors and lamp receptacles 
therefor. Win. Hull. Souris, Man., at- 
tachments to cultivators. -las. \Ym. Mc- 
Donald, "Winnipeg, nut locks. Frank 
L. Armstrong, Moose Jaw. Sask.. serap- 
ers on disc plow-. Win. Maloney. 
Smith's Falls, combined cutting knives 
and distributors for adjusting means 
I'm harvester frames. Wm. Maloney, 
Sherbrooke, threshing harvesters. Har- 
rison C. Frost, Montreal, rubber hose. 
"Wm. I - '. Kendall. Grimsby, Cut., step 
ladders. Arthur P. Couture. Win] 
window hinges. Alex. Dobson, Beaver- 
.. rs. do-. S. Nesbitt, Victoria, 
1 •' . 

43 



BEST ElBOWS 



FOR 



CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 

PLAIN ROUND. 

CORRUGATED. 



Made in . . . 

6 Materials. 
5 Angles. 
14 Sizes. 
1,225 Varieties. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 

Ferdinand Dieckhann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AVE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SYSTEM IN FINDING FOUNDRY 
COSTS. 

By D. C Eggleston. 

ancfl made in 
production during the 
nerall) true that 
ally true that 
the indry has been neglected. 

■ cost system ex- 
,| toward the iron 
tendency has been to try 
stems used in other depart 
However, the work ol the iron 
different in nature from 
other departments that a radi 
cal departure must be made from the 
where employed. 
n\ iron foundrj an analysis of the 
>hows that it is incurred in 
ection with the cupola and several 
work. The output of the 
- in pounds of metal and of the 
in hours of labor. This suggests 
that the entire cupola expense should 
he prorated according to the number of 
pound istings produced and the ex- 

against other classes of work on 
the basis of man hours worked. 
This method requires a division of ex- 
between the cupola and other 
classes of work. In most cases no diffi- 
culty need he experienced in doing this ; 
coke, fire-brick, ladles, lime stone, wood 
and some water are chargeable to cupo- 
The time of the foremen 
and foremen's clerks should be divided 
en cupola and other divisions of 
expei -timate of the time spent 

on coke, pig iron, charging sheet and 
output reports. The administration ex- 
pense not chargeable to the cupola 
should be distributed to other classes of 
work on the ba9is of the number of man 
hours in each. The rent e'xpicnse in- 
cludes all charges on account of grounds, 
buildings, heating, lighting and fire ser- 
This division of expense is dis- 
tributed on the basis of the number of 
-'pian- led oi floor space occupied by 
each class of work. Rower expense 
should be distributed by estimate to the 
various i if work. 

The foundry clerk should keep a card 
m which he records tools such as 
is and d", given out 

(noting to which class of work), and 
the number on hand. Reference to the 
lile facilitates the distribution of sup 
'! : ■ : • are often some items con- 
cerning which there is doubt as to just 
which division of work they should b 

it is necessary to 
i that as ac- 
curate a division may be made as pos- 
sible. 
Tt is the best practice to assign lct- 
irrdicative of the various rates of 
n the different classes of labor. 
Thus I P. A. may b< 
the rate on core work ; I. F. B. on 
tiding, and so on. I 
I he proper L< I 



Accidental 
Discharge :" 

Impossible- 
True only if it is an 

IverJ 



This is why 




The positive safety device is the exclusive patent of the Iver Johnson 
Revolver. See the lever between the hammer and the firing pin ? This 
lever is raised only when the trigger s pulled, receives the blow of the 
hammer and transmits it to the firing pin. That's why you can throw 
a loaded Iver Johnson against a stone wall without fear — no discharge 
can possibly follow, as the hammer never touches the firing pin. An Iver Johnson 
never fails when you pull thi trigger and never "goes off" when you don't. 

Iver Johnson Safety Automatic 

Prices— Hammer $6.50, Hammerless $7.50. 

Iver Johnsons are sold by dealers the 'world over, or direct from us if your dealer won't supply 

Please send for descriptive catalogue, free ufion request. It tells all about it. 
IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS, FITCHBURG. MASS. 



:?*-* 



the workman's time ticket so that the 
expense can be added simultaneously 
with the productive labor to the cost of 
the hob. To the cost of metal tihe 
rate per pound for cupola expense can 
be added, thus giving the indirect ex- 
pense incurred in connection with the 
cupola. The sum of productive labor, . 
labor expense, raw material and cupola 
expense gives the total cost of produc- 
ing the castings on an order. 

Jn the statement of shop deliveries 
the productive labor, raw material and 
expense accounts should be credited and 
piece parts account is credited and the 
the casting is used on an order the 
the piece parts account debited. When 
proper account debited. Thus the cost 
m herewith described not only gives 
accurate costs of production, but also 
facilitates in keeping a check on the 
work of the iron foundry. If it is de- 
sired to cut down expense a study of 
the exhibit of iron foundry figures will 
est valuable economies. Compara- 
tive, figures aid in showing wherein the 
increase or decrease lies. 'That the sys- 
tem herein described has been evolved 
to meet the requirements of the iron 
foundry in a largo manufacturing works 
where it is in successful operation, re- 
commends it to the attention of iron 
foundi ymen. — Iron Ape. 



I'liia. is the adjustable shaving and 
mirror called the "Tipso." This 
Tipso mirror strikes the average per- 
son as just the handiest thing of its 
kind ever put out . 

ft is an oval mirror of French plate, 
bevelled and handsomely mounted in 
metal. It can be adjusted, bv a touch, 
in any direction, at any angle, so as 




A NOVEL SHAVING MIRROR. 

The latest good 1 1 m t he in- 
genious shops of the l Special! \ 
Manufacturing Company, of Philadel- 
44 



"Tipso" Shaving Mirror. 

always to gel the besi Light on the 

face. 

Each mirror has a heavy ball fixture 
for screwing into the window frame or 
wood work frame near am convenient 
light, dav or night. Stands are pro- 
\ uled also for use in dressing tallies, 
supporting the min or a1 various 
a toilel accessory greatly ap- 

a i ed bj women Fi n I sehi ild use 

mi 1 1 aveling, t he Tipso mirroi me 

W idolj fell w ant and all ead.\ it is find- 
ing a very large sale. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONDENSED OR ♦•WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading 2c. a word lirsi 
nsertion ; lc. a word each lubsequenl insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 

$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlooked. 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must he added to cost to cover postage, Stt 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



w 



ANTED— An experienced hnrdwarcman at once; 
write with references and state salary expected 
to Box 273, Tilsonburt:, Ont. [tf] 



WANTED an assistant to editor »f Hardware and 
Metal in Montreal — Young man preferred who 
has had some experience with the hardware or 
metal trades; Excellent opportunity for advancement ; 
state experience and salary expected ; all applications 
treated confidentially. Address, Manager, HARD- 
WARE AND METAL, Montreal. 



TRAVELLER WANTED 



TO sell a line of established successful coal heaters, 
also wood he iters, on commission; must cover 
territory twice or oftener, say once between 
January and April and again between May and August ; 
state lines now carried and territory covered ; liberal 
commission given; Box 573, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. [lj 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



STOVES -An established, successful working line of 
patent coal, also wood heaters, for sale ; including 
patent, patterns, materials and some completed 
stoves; also machinery and dies, if wanted; will go 
with a line of heaters or ranges, or to sell with some 
hardware specialty; proprietor has other pressing 
interests. Address Box 574, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. IH 



\A/ A IM T E I 

by January 1st, 1907, 

Glass Salei 



Must be experienced and reliable, 
state references and qualifications, also 
amount of salary required. Apply only 
by letter to 

Consolidated Piate Class Co., Limited 

Toronto, Canada. (52) 



Are you interested in any of the 
lines that are advertised ? 

A Post Card will bring you price 
list and full information. 

Don't forget to mention Hard- 
ware and Metal. 



Manufacturers' 



nr Hardware and 

10 Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
man ufacturers 

AfffiUtS anc * otnerswant - 

£ j n g representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Mbtal 
Montreal and Toronto 



m 




SHINGLES 



^afe Lock Sminole 



ROCK FACE BRICK BcSTONE. 



Our "Safe Lock" shingleh as helped many a 
dealer to make and hold trade. It's construction ap- 
peals to anyone as being superior, and when put 
on a root" they give lasting satisfaction and make 
neighbors want them. 




SIDINGS 



There is nothing else so suitable as our steel sidings 
to dress up old buildings with and make them warm 
They are also useful for a low priced building where 
attractive appearances are desired. 

CEILINGS 

When you sell and erect one of our classified designs 
you can always count on a well pleased customer - These 
designs do not get out of date same as patterns carrying 
out noidea. Give a customer a selection and he will in- 
variably turn to our classified ceilings. They cannot get 
away from their richness. 

THE METAL SHINGLE & SIDING CO. 

PRESTON, ONTARIO Limited 



genuine Pratts Astral Lamp Oil 

Sold in all countries and recognized as the highest grade oil manufactured. 



WHOLESALE ONLY 
THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY Limited, 



TORONTO, ONT 



Hardware Dealers Should Wake Up— 

to the fact that SHEET METAL BUILDING GOODS could be made a large 
and ever increasing factor in their business. Farmers, manufacturers and 
all owners and builders are daily demanding these goods because they fill 
satisfactorily the gap which is being left by the diminishing supply of 
good and cheap timber. Some dealers have already established a consider- 
able trade in this line, proving that it can be done, but it's "only as a drop 
in the bucket" compared to what's to come. If the HARDWARE 
DEALERS and TINSMITHS don't look after this valuable trade, they will 
live to regret it. Some one else will reap the harvest. 

Don't say— "There's nothing in it for ine"— because there certainly is, 
providing you have the RIGHT GOODS and the RIGHT FIRM behind them. 
It doesn't matter about the manufacturers who sell direct to the consumer. 
One good, square firm, who will PROTECT and HELP a good orginization 
of agents, can, with those agents, do more business than three or four of 
the other kind. 

We can show you— all we need to prove to you how this combination 
will work in 1907 is some more good agents— we've got the goods and 
the other qualifications. One of our representatives will be along your 
way soon after New Years to talk to vou on the subject. If you arc- 
interested drop us a line at once and make certain that you will not be 
missed. 



The 



GALT ART METAL CO., Limited, GALT, ONT. 

Western Distributing Agents, THE McCLARY MFC. CO., Winnipeg and Calgary. 




Will Hold up a Shell "THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 



That! what a shelf bracket ia for. 
For thla purpose there can he 
Nothing Bitter. Koibish 
Oiitrm th»o the BRADLEY STEEL 
BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The saTiuB on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower prloe at which the goods 
are sold. Ordar direct or through your Jobbers. 
ATLAS MFC. CO., 
Now Havan, Conn., 

4=> 



Made In 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without "Emlyn 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

OHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables— 
"Machinery," Newport. 



Emlyn Engineering Works 
NswroiT, Mom, Emolamd 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Paint, Oil and Brush Trades 



THE SHORTAGE OF GASOLINE. 

"Fax-reaching are the econoaaic ef* 
of the rising price of gasoline," 
the Boston Transcript " For 
jbousands ol scattered factories the 
is to-day furnished by gasoline 
engines, which operate on the explos- 
ion principle, made popularly familiar 
by the operations of the automobile. 
Bui the rising price oi gasoline is so 
seriously inle Perlng with the growth, if 
not tlio maintenance, of this form or 
power supply that engine manufactur- 
ers are now experimenting on an ex- 
tensive scale with the Less costly dis- 
tillates in the hope of getting a suit- 
able substitute. It is against this com- 
mercial use of gasoline that the present 
- will have their firs! effect. Bui 
other of its uses will be affected if its 
pure mounts much higher, notably the 
development of the autotruck. But for 
tin- prospect of diverting some oi' the 
demand for gasoline to the other dis- 
fcillati S Clde oil. and the likelihood 

that denatured alcohol will relieve the 
situation somewhat, gasoline would al- 
ready have gone much higher than now. 
The quality of the gasoline is also af- 
■d. since it is believed that to-day 
a proportion of Texas crude oil is often 
mixed with that from the Pennsylvania 
wells to make the latter 'go further.' 
before the process of refining begins. 
The result is that greater residuum of 
mineral matter, of which automobilists 
and others are now complaining. 

■•America's production of gasoline is 
apparently not on the increase, although 
this country's output of crude oil has 
been steadily, if not sensationally, in- 
creasing in volume, and is now larger 
than ever before. This contrast is due 
to the character of the Texas and Cali- 
fornia oil fields, both of which yield a 
small percentage of gasoline, and also 
of all other grades of lighter oils. The 
best fields of these are in Pennsylvania. 
But that state is not maintaining its 
proportions of the total supply, and 
as a result gasoline is falling relatively 
behind. 

"From the oil as it goes through a 
process of refinement, the first vapors 
which condense into liquid form are the 
naphthas, gasoline and kerosene in that 
order; then come the neutral, or solar, 
oils which are sold to the gas companies 
to make the illuminanl of our cities. 
Then follow the lubricating distilates, 
and finally those heavy oils used in cy- 
linders. In the Pennsylvania field from 
60 to 7(i pei- cent, of the oil is turned 
erosene or lighter distillates, while 
in Texas less than 20 per cent, is thus 
available. This tells the story. Within 
the memory of the present generation 
gasoline sold for 6 or 7 cents a gallon, 



!-<■ the demand at that end of the 
line was so small. It now retails at 
about 20 cents, ('e.rtain industries, 
notably the automobile and the power 
engine run by gasoline, jiave so focused 
demand on it that it is sure to increase 

greatly in price unless relieved by al- 
ternative products. Il is hoped thai h\ 
a display of ingenuity the solar oils 
can yet be used in the factory engines. 
"Kerosene, which is still going up 
in price, although less in proportion 
than gasoline, is the great illuminant 
ol' the world, not only in the rural reg- 
ions of America, but in all continents, 
down to the very grade of life which 
regards artificial light 'is not worth hav- 
ing. It is a curious fact that the in- 
crease in electric-lighting plants ap- 
parently increases the demand for ker- 
asene oil, too, often in the very towns 
where electric works are operated, peo- 
ple accustom themselves to certain de- 
grees of light, forming habits in that 
regard which, like popular demands in 
heating and other things, show them- 
selves all along the line. Gas and 
electric lighting have created a popular 



taste lor more light, and this in turn 
affects those who depend on kerosene 

I'M their illumination. 

"The troubles in Russia have great- 
ly affected the situation in Europe to- 
day, so that it has been obliged to im-j 
pori large quantities of Texas product, 
although a few years ago if was with 
great difficulty that the Texas lubrica- 
ting oils found any market there. There 
13 a tremendous demand for them now, 
and one that it is almost impossible 
adequately to meet. The world might, 
well wonder how it will get along for 
lubrication of its countless machines, as 
well as for light, when the stored supply 
of mineral oils have been exhausted, 
but for experience with similar worries 
before. The old lady who expected to 
have to sit in darkness when all the 
whales had been driven from the seas 
expressed a fear which has found many 
forms. President I (wight, of Vale Col- 
lege, in his celebrated 'Travels,' written 
a centuiy ago, regarded the outlook of 
New York state for growth in popula- 
• tion and business, limited only by its 
fuel supplies. He did not think enough 



Looking Back Over 1906 

if you have not been an Elastilite 
agent you can readily see where 
one mistake has been made. 

Elastilite Varnish is an old reliable 
yet the up-to-the-minute line for 
1907. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 




The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA. 

Stocks at 

VANCOUVER, B.C., c/o DURAND MERCHANDISE CO. 
WINNIPEG, MAN., c/o MASON & HICKEY. 



LIMITED 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^■^■^^■^^^^■^^.^.■^■■^■^^-^^^■^•^■■m.^.^.-*.-^.-^.-^^/^-^ -. 



41 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



GIVE 

YOURSELF 

A 

SQUARE 

DEAL 



ANY ONE PREACHING YOUR PAINT DEFECTS? 

Too significant a question that for any dealer to ignore. The shrewd 

dealer will not. 

Paint defects have ruined more business than any one thing in your 

line— and you know it. Why t> ke risks ? We do not claim as much 

for our Paints and Varnishes as some manufacturers, but the 

majority of dealers have discovered t*-at our Paints and 

Varnishes are the best on the market. 

It isn't fair to yourself to make up an order list until you've seen our 

catalogue. Have you one ? A post card brings it. 

STANDARD PAINT AND VARNISH WORKS CO., LIMITED 

WINDSOR ONTARIO 



Have you ever tried to sell 

JAMIESON'S 
Floor Enamels ? 

They will please your 
customers because they 
possess just those 
qualities which the 
ordinary floor paints 
lack. 

We guarantee them to 
dry hard over night, 
without cracking, leav- 
ing a fine glossy finish. 

Floors on which our 
enamels are used, are 
never sticky, and never 
peel off, thus meaning 
less work to the house- 
wife who desires to 
keep her floor clean. 

Genuine satisfaction 
awaits the users, and 
this ensures a continu- 
ance of trade, to the 
dealer who handles 
them. 



Manufactured in all desirable 
colors by 

R. G. JAMIESON & GO. 

LIMITED 

16-30 Nazareth St., MONTREAL 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Manufacturers 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGHGRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 




IMPROVED CARPENTERS 
TOOLS 



Sold by all Hardware 
Dealers 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO 



NEW BRITAIN., Conn., U.S.A. 




GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS OF PROVED WORTH 

Having a Century's Reputation for Reliability. 
MADE BY 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Elng. 

CANADIAN AGENT 

GODFREY S. PELTON, 201 Coristine Building, Montreal 

The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

R. E. THORNE & CO. 

The only bronze powder works under the British flag. 
High Crade bronze powders and bronze liquids. 
Can fill all orders at short notice. 

rvl O INJ T R EC A L_ — TORONTO 
WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD. NO ORDER TOO LARGE 



wood could be mown there t<> provide 
for more than about so many people. 
Although he visited Niagara be aevex 
looked upon it as a substitute for the 

3tS. 

• • Some i :' the oldest of the Pennsyl- 
vania wells arc still producing oil, al- 
though not so much as formerly. But 

47 



now regions a stantly discovered, 

so that the present generation need not 
worry. The economic price will keep 
an effective check valve on consump-i 

t ion. lest il run away from supply, just 
as it is now sending inventors into ex- 
perimental engines, which may utilize 
the low er-grade oils." 



HARDWARE AND M E T A i_ 



As the 
White Lead is 
So is the Paint 

The only white lead used in 

"Anchor" and "English'' 

LIQUID HOUSE PAINTS 

is Brandram's B.B. Genuine. 



Brandram's 

B. B. GENUINE 

has been the world's standard 
white lead for close on to 
two centuries. 



With such a foundation of 
quality as this, are you sur- 
prised that 

"Anchor" and "English" 

LIQUID HOUSE PAINTS 

are standards all over Can- 
ada and wherever else they 
are sold. 



Paint and Oil Markets 



BRANDRAM- 
HENDERSON 



LIMITED' 



Halifax, St. John, 
Montreal, Winnipeg, 

MARSHALL WELLS CO., Winnipeg 
Sole Distributors for Western Canada 



MONTREAL. 

Office of llAUDWAKK AND ifETAL, 

232 Met;. 11 Street, 

Montreal, January 4, 1907. 

Stock-taking is the order. Some tra- 
velers bave started oul and others are 
waiting until norma] conditions are re- 
sumed after I he holidays. 

Paris Green is being freely advertis- 
ed lids week as usual and prices arc 
normal for the season. 

Turpentine and linseed oil remain 
li i ill and while lead is firm at the ad- 
vance of three weeks ago. 

UNSEED Oil We continue to 

quote: Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 55c; 5 
to 9 barrels, 54c.; boiled, 1 to 4 barrels, 
38c; 5 to 9 barrels, 57c. 

TURPENTINE. — We are now 
quoting : Single barrel, 96c. per 
gal. ; two barrels or over, 

l)5c per gal.; for smaller quantities than 
barrels, 5c. extra per gal. is charged 
Standard gallon is 8.40 lbs., f.o.b. point 
of shipment, net 30 days. 

GROUND WHITE LEAD.— The re- 
cent advance is being rigidly main- 
tained and grinders have no trouble in 
getting the following prices: Best 
brands Government Standard, $7.25 to 
$7.50; No. 1, $G.90 to $7.15; No. 2. $6.55 
to $6.90; No. 3, $6.30 to $6.55 all f.o.b., 
Montreal. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— We still quote 
as follows : V.M. Red Seal, 7^c to 8c ; 
Red Seal, 7c to 8c ; French V.M.; 6c to 
7c ; Lehigh, 5c to Gc. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Manu- 
facturers have raised their prices, and 
. we now quote : Pure, 8^c to :>£c. ; No. 
1, 7c. to 8c; No. 2, 5fe. to 6fc. 

PUTTY — A heavy demand is 

shown. We quote prices: Pure 

linseed oil, $1.75 to $1.85 ; bulk in bar- 
rels, $1.50; in 25-lb. irons, $1.80 ; in 
tins, $1.90 ; bladder putty in barrels, 
$1.75. 

ORANGE MINERAL— We quote as 
follows : Casks, 8c ; 100 lb. kegs, 8Jc 

RED LEAD— The following quotations 
are firm: Genuine red lead in casks, 
$6.00 ; in - 100-lb. kegs, $6.25 ; in 
less quantities at the rate of $7 per 100 
lbs. ; No. 1 red lead, casks, $5.75 ; kegs 
$6, and smaller quantities, $6.75. 

PARIS GREEN— Prices are as 
follows: In barrels, about 600 pounds, 
23±c. per lb.; in arsenic kegs, 250 lbs.. 
234c; in 50 lb. drums, 24c; in 25 lb. 
drums, 24ic; in 1 lb. packets, 100 lbs. 
in ease, 25c; in 1 lb packets, 50 lbs in 
case, 254c; in -J lb. packets, 100 lbs in 
case, 27c; in 1 lb. tins, 26c f.o.b. 
Montreal. Term three months net or 
2 per cent. 30 days. 

SHELLAC— Quotations are as fol- 
lows: Bleached, in bars or ground. 16c 
per lb., f.o.b. Pastern Canadian points, 
I 'one Dry, 57c per lb., f.o.b. Eastern 

48 



etc., 

prices 

$2.95 ; 
No. 1 

from 



Canadian points; T.N. Orange, 
48c per Ih. f.o.b. New York. 

SHELLAC VARNISH— The 

are : Pure white, $2.90 to 
pure orange, $2.70 to $2.75 ; 
orange, $2.50 to $2.55. 

MIXED DA 1NTS— Prices range 
$1.20 to $1.40 per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL— We still quote as fol- 
lows : Firsts in cases, 8£c ; in barrels, 
Sc; seconds in cases, 8c; in barrels, 7^c 

BENZINE— We still quote 25 cents in 
barrels, and 30 cents in smaller quanti- 
ties. 

WINDOW CLASS— Our prices are: 
First break, 50 feet, $1.85; second 
break, 50 feet, $1.95 ; first break. 
100 feet, $3.20 ; second break, 
100 feet, $3.40; third break, 100 feet, 
$3.95; fourth break, 100 feet, $4.15 ; 
fifth break, 100 feet, $4.40; sixth break, 
100 feet, $4.95. Diamond Star : First 
break, 50 feet, $2.30 ; second break, 50 
feet, $2.50 ; first break, 100 feet, $4.40 ; 
second break, $4.80 ; ' third break, 100 
feet, $5.75 ; fourth break, 100 feet, 
$6.50 ; fifth break, 100 feet, $7.50 ; sixth 
break, 100 feet, $7.50 ; seventh break, 
100 feet, $8 ; eighth break, 100 feet, $9. 
Double Diamond : First break, 50 feet, 
$3.45 ; second break, 50 feet, $3.75 ; 
first break, 100 feet, $6.75 ; second 
break, 100 feet, $7.25 ; third break, 100 
feet, $8.75 ; fourth break, 100 feet, $10; 
fifth break, 100 feet, $11.50 ; sixth 
break, 100 feet, $12.50 ; seventh break, 
100 feet, $14 ; eighth break, 100 feet, 
$16.50 ; ninth break., 100 feet, $18 ; tenth 
break, 100 feet, $20 ; eleventh break, 
100 feet, $24 ; twelfth break, 100 feet, 
$28.50. Discount on Diamond Star, 20 
per cent.; on Double Diamond, 40 per 
cent. 



TORONTO. 

Office of Hardware ±xt> Metal, 
10 Front Street East. 

Toronto, January 4, 190? 

The paint and oil markets remain 
unchanged, hul another increase is 
looked for in lead and terpentine. 

Travelers have again resumed their 
work OD the road, and reporl an in- 
creased demand tor paints, etc. Re- 
tail merchants will do well to order 
now, as the large demand will no doubt 
cause a shortage. 

WHITE LEAD— Ex Toronto pure 
white. $7.40: No. 1, $6.6;-); No. 2, $6.25; 
No. 3, $5.90; No. 4, $5.65 in packages 
of '_'.") pounds and upwards; L-2c per 
pound extra will be charged for 12 1-2 
pound packages; genuine dry white 
lead in casks, $7.00. 

RED LEAD— Genuine in casks of 500 
lbs., $6.00; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., 
$6.50; No. 1 in casks of 500 lbs., $5.75; 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $6.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— In casks, 7 
l-2c; in 100 lbs., 8c, No. 1, in casks 
6 l-2c, in 100 lbs., 7c. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



YOUR PAINT TRADE FOR 1907 

will be interesting if you do it with 




LET US POST YOU 



A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 



Kit. 1842 



MONTREAL PAINT MAKERS 



Just try some ordinary green paint 
on a panel of wood, see how hard it 
works, — don't cover, lacks body. Then 
try on another panel 

LUCAS IMPERIAL 
FRENCH GREEN 

notice how easy it spreads, how well it 
covers, — that's body. Makes the cost 
less for this reason alone, and stays 
fresh and brilliant. It preserves the 
wood, keeps the weather out and the 
color in. It is the ONE Green that is 
free from arsenic or verdigris. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 

JOHN LUCAS & CO. 



NEW YORK, 



PHILADELPHIA, 



CHICACO 



it, 



Extry! "Extry! 



i j 



the newsboy's cry. 

We all want the "EXTRA" the something 
out of the ordinary. Someone lias said, " It is 
the 'Extras' that make life worth the living." 

The "EXTRA" news brings the "EXTRA" 

pennies to the newsboy. 

The "EXTRA" quality of goods or service- 
brings the "EXTRA" dollars to the business 
man. 



EXTRA brings EXTRA 

Wow, What we have to offer 
is the Exclusive Agency of 

The Martin-Senour Paint 



THE PAINT THAT IS 

100 per cent pure 

The absolute purity of The Martin-Senour 
House Paint has been the means of obtaining 
"EXTRA" profitable returns to our agents. 

The Martin-Senour Paint is not only as 
pure as the average mixed paint but it is a little 
"EXTRA" it's 100 per cent. pure. 

We would be glad to tell you more about it. 



The 



Martin-Senour Co., 



Ltd. 



" Pioneers of Pure Paints 



142-144 Inspector St., 



Montreal 



2514-2520 Quarry Street and Archer Avenue 
Chicago 

(Established 1878 1 

The Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co. The Maritime Paint & Varnish Co. 
Winnipeg Halifax, N.S. 



49 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 




Hardware merchants who 
number farmers and market 
gardeners among their cus- 
tomers should make early 
arrangements for a supply of 

the > 

CANADA f 

PAINT 

COMPANY'S 

PARIS 
GREEN 



WHITE ZINC (ground in oil) —In 25- 

lli. irons, 8&J in \1 L-2 U.S., S l-2e. 

SHINGLE STAIN In 5-gallon lots, 
75c. to 80c. per gallon. 

PARIS WHITE— 90c. in barrels to 
$1.25 per 100 lbs. 

\\ IIITING— 60c. per 100 lbs. in bar- 
rels; Gilders' bolted whiting, 90c. in 
barrels, $1.15 in smaller quantities. 

SHELLAC VARNISH Pore ora 
in barrels, $2.70; white, $2.82 1-2 per 
barrel; No. 1 (orange) $2.50; gum shel- 
lac, bone dry, C3c, Toronto. T. V 
(orange) 51c. net Toronto. 

LINSEED OIL— We still quote: 
Raw, l to l barrels, 57c; 5 to 9 barrels, 
57c; boiled, 1 to 4 barrels, 60c; 5 to 9 
barrels, 59c. Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Guelph ; net 30 days. Ad- 
vance of 2c. for delivery to outside 
points. ;| 

TURPENTINE— Single barrels, 97c; 
2 to 4 barrels, 96c; f.o.b. point of 
shipment, net 30 days. Less than bar- 
rels, $1.02 per gallon. 

GLUES-French Medal, 12 l-2c. per 
pound; domestic shee , 10 l-2c. per lb. 

PUTTY— Ordinary, 800 casks, $1.50; 
100 drums, $1.75, barrels or bladders, 
$1.75; 100-lb. eases, $1.90;; 25-lb. irons, 
$1.85; 25-lb. tins (4 to case) $1.90; 12 
4 lb. tins (8 to case) $2.10. 

LIQUID PAINTS -Pure, $1.20 to 
$1.35 per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gal- 
lon. 

BARN FAINTS— Gals., 70c. to 80c. 

BRIDGE PAINTS— Gals., 75c. to. $1. 

CASTOR OIL— English, in cases, 9 
l-2c. to 10c. per lb., and lie. for single 
tins. 

PARIS GREEN— Canadian manufac- 
turer are quoting their base price at 
B5c and <ni the English, 25 :! 4 is quoted 
f.o.b., Toronto. 

REFINED PETROLEUM — Dealers 
are stocking up heavily for the Winter. 
We still quote : Canadian prime white, 
14c. ; water white, 16c. ; American wa- 
ter white, 16c. to lie. ex warehouse. 

CRUDE PETROLEUM — We quote : 
Canadian, $1.32 ; Pennsylvania, $1.58 ; 
Ohio, 96c. 

SAVE OIL YIW DS FROM TRUST. 

It the finds of oil on the Manitoulin 
islands are as great as reported, the 
discovery is of immense importance, it, 
rather, can be made so if the product 
can be protected by Government from 
falling into the maw of the Standard 
ibine, says the Montreal Witness. 

Contemporam s with this discovery 

is the action of the I nited States Gov- 
ernment, which is taking measures in 
the South-West for the purpose of pre 
venting discrimination and making the 
oil tiade open to all producers. For 

this purpose a concession has been 

I ed i" i he tfellen Company of Pitt 
burs- to erect en al ion lands a 

pipe from Hart les* file, Indian Terril on 
to points in Texas, with a view to at 
fording an outlet through Guli ports to 
[ the Indian Territorj and 
Oklahoma field. 

The officials of the Deparl tnent of the 

BVe t hat the independence of 
£0 



operators in the South Western held 
is Uius secured. Under the government 
regulations, it will be impossible for the 
osed pipe line, which is estimated 
to cosl eight million dollars, ever to 
fall into the hands of the Standard or 
any other oil monopoly. 1 he regula- 
tions prepared by the Department are 
hard and East, and give the Secretary 
ol the Interior authority to cancel on 
ten days' notice the contract of any 
individual or eouip^..., in the event that 
the terms oi the contract are violated. 
Here is precedent and practice lor our 

Government to follow in the ease of 
the Mamtoulin oil wells. 

A barrel of crude petroleum contain- 
ing about fort\ three gallons, can be 
delivered on board ship for the trifle of 
ten cents, but when it has passed 
through the hands of the Standard Oil 
combine, and has gone through a com 
tiveiy inexpensive refining process, 
twentj live cents a gallon is charged for 
it. That would be profit with a ven- 
geance. The ten cents would be changed 
into nearly eleven dollars net. As the 
oil on the Manitoulin Islands is said to 
be of such good quality that it would 
yield a splendid profit even if* sold at 
ten cents a gallon, the Government 
should do its utmost to secure to the 
public such a boon. 



PLEASE THE WOMEN. 

I 'lens.' a woman with a household 
novelty and ten to one she will succeed 
in using it for a variety of things the 
manufacturer never dreamed of, except- 
ing when he had the nightmare, says 
Hardware. Disappoint her and the 
chances are she never afterwards can 
find a hammer in the whole concern 
good enough to drive a carpet tack. 
'Hint isn't the worst of it. She will tell 
her family so convincingly how she has 
been swindled that not a member of it 
will ever trade al such a place again: 
they would not dare to, [est she find it 
out. 

A man will <^{ outrageously cheat- 1 
ed and then will say nothing, hut "fin 
sardonically while ail of his fellows go 
in and do likewise. A woman will drag 
llii in back by force and call the police 
if I hey insist on entering. Perhaps the 
man may even he cajolled and made to 
believe that he was not hurt very much; 
at least, that he has been a victim of 
circumstance rather than of fraud; 
anyway he wants t(,i go hack just to 
see if it can he done to him again. 
Swindle a. woman and all the apologies 
in the world won't quiet her. She is 
after the goods and not excuses. Either 
she is suited, and till sweet words, or 
else she isn't and is all words that are 
not so sweet, and there it ends — only, 
something else begins. 

Certainly it pays to please the wo- 
men. No other class of customers are 
more liberal or more loyal; none others 
half so influential as they ill favor otf 

their commercial friends. But an offend- 
ed woman will gel even seven times 
over if she has to wait ten years to do 
it. and in the meantime is compelled to 
organize a special social club or sewing 

society to accomplish bar reven'g*. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



BERRY BROTHER'S VARNISHES 

are one grand ^tory of success 

BECAUSE THEY ARE THE BEST 

They arc the safest goods to handle, 
and the most reliable goods to use. 

Write for Catalogue, Information and Prices. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
PHILADELPHIA 
BALTIMORE 



Varnish Manufacturers 

DETROIT 
Canadian Factory— WALKERVILLE ONT. 



CHICAGO 
CINCINNATI 
ST. LOUIS 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Money in Your Pocket 

The difference between supplying good reliable paint and selling paint of an 
inferior quality, is Money in Your Pocket. You can only sell bad paint to an 
intelligent man once. He makes no fuss — but he goes to the store that sells 

Ark Brand Paint 

the next time he wants paint. You can't blame him — can you ? He's simply out for the best 
his money can buy — a paint as near perfection as can be. Money can't buy a more enduring 
paint than Ark Brand, and that's the kind of paint which builds up a thriving business you'll 
admit. 

JHURESCO WALL FINISH 

delights the man who applies it, and gives more satisfaction to 
customers than any other placed on the market. 




THE BENJAMIN MOORE CO., LIMITED 

FORMERLY THE FRANCIS FROST CO., LIMITED 



New York 



TORONTO, CANADA 



Chicago 




51 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




OUR NAME 



on a can of Paint or Varnish means that we guarantee its good 
quality. The name "Sterling" corresponds with the Sterling stamp 
on silverware— GENUINE— THE BEST. 

A storekeeper is to be judged by the quality of the goods he 
handles. 
The best storekeepers sell "Sterling" goods. 
Do YOU sell " Sterling " Paint ? 

There is no better or more satisfactory paint made, and one dealer in your town is 
going to have the reputation of selling The Best Paint. Our representative will call upon 
you in a few days to offer a good proposition, which means so much to you that you can- 
not afford to turn it down. Kindly defer placing your Spring order until he has seen you. 

Manufactured by 

CANADIAN OIL COMPANY 

TORONTO UM,TED 

MONTREAL ST. JOHN OTTAWA WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



THE HOUSEKEEPER'S DREAM. 

I dreamt that I dwelt in Alabastined halls, 
Alabastined ceilings, Alabastined walls, 
Where the fairies love to congregate and meet 
The air is so etherial, pure and sweet. 

Cupids and fairies will visit you at night 

In rooms, Alabastined beautiful and bright, 

From kalsomines or wall papers tainted with decay 

High on upward wing they rise and flee away. 

ALABASTINE is the only Wall Coating, which is extensively and persistently advertised to the general 
public, and is what the people call for when they want anything in the line. 

THIS IS NO DREAM 

Our publicity campaign for 1907, as planned, is sure to more than double the already large trade for 
ALABASTINE. 

Our new illustrated catalogue, " HOMES, HEATHFUL AND BEAUTIFUL" is the sensation of 
the season in the advertising line. 

Get ready to supply the large and growing demand for ALABASTINE by ordering a full assortment, 
either direct or through your nearest jobber, and DO IT NOW. 

The ALABASTINE CO., Limited, PARIS, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Long and the Short of It 



IT" MEANS 




THE "LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and give your cus- 
tomers many years of solid satisfaction. 

THE "SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. A great 
deal of time — which means a great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERJftY®, McCOMB 

t>3 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 




ATKINS §'t l e Tl SAWS 

make merchandising easy The Quality in them, backed by 
our enthusiastic publicity, has made them popular — we 
create the demand— you supply it. Easy to buy them — at 
your jobbers- -or nearest branch. 



E. C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Canadian Branch, 77 Adelaide St. E., TORONTO 



WINDOW GLASS FOR IMPORT 

We have Special Prices for Import 
for Spring Delivery. 

Do not place your order before see- 
ing our prices. They will interest 
you. 
Save money by importing direct. 

We offer special Strong Cases, thus ensuring delivery in 

good order. 

Send us your specification. We are always pleased to 
quote prices. 

The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 




LONDON 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



53 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



THE STANDARD IDEAL SANITARY CO., LIMITED 




We manufacture a complete line of 

Range-Closets, Range-Urinals, 

Lavatories 

and Sanitary Fixtures 

Suitable for Public Institutions 



Plate E. 404.— For Public Institutions, Schools, Factories, 

Asylums, &c. 



The reputation of our goods is unequalled. 

Toronto: 50 Colborne Street Montreal : 128 Craig Street West 

Winnipeg : 24 Telfer Building 

HOME OFFICE and FACTORIES : PORT HOPE, ONT. 



With the advent of another year, we prepare for 
progress with time, to retain and improve upon the pro- 
ducts of our manufactures of 





ineers 

Electric fixtures 



We extend to our Friends and Patrons our appre- 
ciation for their favors to us during the past year, and 
trust the future may bring to them increased prosperity. 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 

93-95 Adelaide Street West, Toronto 



54 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Plumbing and Steamfitting 



CLOSET CONNECTIONS TO SOIL PIPE STACK 

ITwo more letters sent in replying to the question, the prize-winning answer to 
which was published in HARDWARE AND METAL of December 29.1 



We publish herewith two letters re- 
ceived in connection with the last con- 
icsi, thej speak for themselves: 

In connection with the sketch by ■). 
H. Wainwrightj of Sudbury, Out., we 
beg to express the opinion that, at ii 
the case of last week's illustration 
no vent would be required in the case 
of am of the fixture connections shewn. 
tor the reasons mentioned in our last 
issue, referring to the letter by "X' - 
of Ottawa, we think most of the argu- 
ments are good, but do not think that 
ventilation of short fixture connection 
is necessary, because even if there was 
no current of air, the natural diffusion 
of the gases would change the air with 
sufficient frequency. 

Sudbury Plumber's Reply. 

In your judgment is it essential that 
evey closet connection to slack should 
be provided with a break syphon ? Yes. 
If the closet waste can be called a stack, 
when it does not continue through the 
roof. But if the soil pipe has to con- 
tinue through the roof to be called a 
stack, then a special break syphon is 
not essential in the following circum- 
stances: 

1. Where only one closet is connected 
to stack. The stack acting directly as 
a break syphon. As in sketch No. 1. 

2. Where two or more closets are 
connected to stack, whether it be on 
the same floor or not. The highest con- 
nection does not require a special break 
syphon. As the condition is the same 
as in No. 1, sketches 2 and 3. 

.'!. Where two closets are connected 
one on each side of the stack, neither 
need a special break syphon, as the 
condition is the same as in No. 1, sketch 
No. 4, both connections being the, same 
level. 

.7. R. Wainwright, Sudbury. 

An Ottawa Reply. 

With wash down closets adjacent to 
soil pipes, break syphons are, in my 
opinion, unwarranted. 

To-day, these fixtures have a dia- 
meter of about three inches, and the 
lead bend, to which attachment is made, 
has a diameter of four inches. Here, 
then, is a difference of 7 inches in the 
square of each circle. While the closet 
is operating, a column of water solid 
in form, equal to the circle of the 
closet is in action. Directly it leaves 
the bowl its syphonic force is broken, 
by reason of the enlarged channel, the 
moving column with extended play, i- 
transformed into a splash, in its des- 
cent, drawing on the air reserve, that 
the four inch bend allows, thereby savin? 



the seal of the t rap. This argument, 

would suit a eloset any distance from 
the staid;. 

This, I think, fully answers your 
question, but. your readers, having in 

mind the position of the closet, will, per 
haps, follow a further reference to the 
Utility Of the break syphon. Owing I" 
tin two fold purpose of this tube, it 
is rather diflicult to be clear, and "stick 
to the point." 

To impress my argument forcibly, 
suppose, the closet was attached to a 



PLUMBERS IN THE GAS TRADE. 

The gag fieb isle "i 

fixtures, Btoves, i>iping oJ 
ami other applianc 

rly almost entirely controlled by 
the plumbing trade, says the Metal 
worker^ bm Bince the gas companies 
through the introduction of ap- 
proved appliance* and the reduction of 
their manufacturing expenses found it 
able to sell gas ai prevailing rates 
they have largely monopolized the b 
ness through a desire to increase the 
consumption of gas. And in order that 
the gas consuming appliances should be 
brought before the people and be readily 
purchased they have introduced them • 




bend with a diameter no greater than 
its own, the syphonic force would not 
be broken until il left the bend. A 
break syphon then would be of primary 
importance, but under the conditions 
which seem general, the break syphon 
is of only secondary importance. 

As a means of thoroughly vcntilat- 
i system, its importance is recog- 
nized. This, alone, is why it should Be 
connected to, or helow every closet 
tray. X.. Ottawa. 

55 



*"r 
ringht Sudburu., Ont 

at phenomenally low cost. For this 
reason many plumbers have neglected 
the trade or else abandoned it alto- 
gether. 

The gas companies continue to mar- 
ket appliances of this kind at low fig- 
ures, but their entire aim is to sell ma- 
terial which will consume gas, appar- 
ently no attention being paid to the 
economic combustion of the fuel. This 
is to their interest and it is to be ex- 
peeted that they would have no special 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



desire t^ sol tsuming goods at 

a low price where the consumption of 

gas would l)i- low, so loi ■ "so. 

as ii is not particularly wasteful. Dur- 

lie past few years a number o 
heaters, gas bnrners and appliances for 
heating water have been placed on the 
market which wore specially designed 
foi economical combustion of fuel and 
it would undoubtedly be greatly to the 
advantage of plumbers to make Borne 
study of the subjecl with a view to 
establishing a trade in these lines. 
Many plumbers in cities, particularly 
places "I' business are lo- 
cated on the main streets, keep their 
shops open tor an hour or so at*or the 
workmen have quit, simply to be in 
their places of business to receive or- 
ders that may come in or to make col- 
lections, and sonic of these have found 
it profitable to sell gas mantles, shades 
and the like simply to bring people into 
the store and the showroom, and thus 

make them better acquainted with their 

plumbing wares. It is a form of adver- 
tising which pays for itself and is 
doubtless very advantageous. 



DISPOSAL OF HOUSEHOLD 
WASTES. 

In a recent book entitle, 1 ■•Outlines 
,,t Practical Sanitation,'' by Dr^ Har- 
\.\ 1'.. Bashore, inspector of tins De- 
partment of Health for Pennsylvania, 
reference is made to the disposal "I 
wastes from the country house. If the 
dry method of disposing of the human 
wastes is used there will be certain 
waste waters from the bath and kitchen 
sink to be taken care of, the author 
explains, and this, he says, is best done 
by some form of surface drain suspend- 
ed over the garden lied. One such drain 
shown in the book is made of a 6-inch 
galvanized roof gutter, pierced every 1'-! 
inches by 1-4-inch holes. His discus- 
sion of the question is as follows: The 
gutter allows the filthy water to be 
distributed evenly over the ground with- 
out forming puddles and mud holes. 

The solid refuse about country and 
village houses generally adorns the ash 
pile or alley. The disposal of these pro- 
3 becomes easy, if the various kinds 
collected and kept separate. A 
good way is to have a series of recep- 
tacles for the materials and a certain 
place for each one, or perhaps have all 
these receptcles arranged together in a 
large box near the kitchen door. In 
receptacle, which might be a flour 
sack sunported by an iron rack, we 
would collect the rags, paper, etc. In 
another tin cans, bottles and such rub 
bish; then in a suitable can the ashes 
and in another the garbage— that is, the 
solid waste from the kitchen- 

Now as to the ultimate disposal of 
this solid waste: The garbage is best 
disposed of by earth burial — simply put 
B shallow furrow in a field and 
covered with a little earth. If the gar- 
den bed is near the kitchen a good way 
i- to have a hole in the bed and practice 
daily dis| osal of ihe garbage. Every 



evening it should be covered with earth. 
and in addition a tight board lid should 
cover the hole during the summer 
months, else the place may become a 
i g I iace t'oi Hies ami degene] ate 
into a nuisance. The noncombustible 

part of the rubbish, such BS hollies, tin 
cans, scraps of metal, etc.. can usually 
be Bold to the junk dealer, ami the 
combustible part — rags ami paper — if 
not salable, should be destroyed by tire. 
Ashes can be used in almost any place 
I'm tilling, making paths and for foun- 
dations under pavements. 

WARNER'S GAS CANNON. 

The Warner Motor Co., Flatiron 
Building, New York, arc introducing a. 

n,.\elt\ iii the form of a gas cannon, 
which operates t>\ the explosion of a 
tiny mixture of carbide gas and air. 
This gas is made from a small lump of 
calcium carbide, dropped into water, 
(carbide can be procured everywhere), 
and flows into the cannon through a 
-mill rubber tube, controlled by a stop 
cock. This charge is exploded by pull- 
ing a lanyard which Hashes an electric 
spark inside the breach, making the op- 
eration absolutely like the firing of the 
big 12 inch guns on a battle ship. Car- 
bide gas when it explodes makes a big 
noise, but its actual mechanical effect 
i which is power for doing harm) is ex- 
tremelv small as compared with gun 
powder. A cork or tight fitting cylin- 




Warner's Gas Cannon. 

der of wood makes the best projectiles 
for the cannon. One of these comes 
with the outfit. 

The cannon is made of cast iron 6i 
inches long, neatly mounted on a press- 
ed steel frame which fits over the top 
of the containing box. The gas genera- 
tor requires only water and one small 
lump of calcium carbide to provide am- 
munition for 20 shots. This carbide can 
be procured very cheaply anywhere. 
There is a small pinch-cock on the frame 
of the cannon by pressing which the gas 
is admitted to the cannon. 

The cannon can be used in many ways 
and one in operation in a window in 
holiday seasons should attract all the 
boys in the neighborhood as well as en- 
couraging many sales. 

ABUSES IN THE INSTALLATIONS. 
Carelessness in bolting up flanged 
joints frequently leads to disastrous re- 
sults, says the Valve World. It ofton 
happens that when joints do not come 
squarely together, the workmen, instead 
of seeing that the line is made square so 
that the joints will come together prop- 
erly, will undertake to spring a very 
rigid pie f ' e of work in the bolting, the 
result being that if something docs not 
give way under this strain on the bolts, 
it very likely will do so when the pipe 
is subjected to expansion and contrac- 
tion. 

\ nother blunder frequently made bv 
workmen is in not taking pains to tight- 
en the bolts evenly so that they will all 

56 



be brought up together to the same ten- 
sion. They will start in and tighten up 
"lie side, hard, and then when they come 
to tighten the opposite side, it throws 
a veiy severe strain on the side first 
tightened. If the flange is not broken 
by this strain, there is the same danger 
we have mentioned above, that, is, that 
it will break under the strain of expan- 
sion and contraction. 

It also frequently happens that when 
leaks occur after steam is turned on 
they are not promptly and properly at- 
tended to. This, of course, is very bad 
practice, for every engineer knows that 
it a leak is allowed to run for any 
length of time it will injure the materi- 
al, either the metal or the packing of 
both. Furthermore, it will then be im- 
possible to tighten it by screwing up 
the bolts. 

Rather than go to the trouble of takr- 
ing the joint apart, putting in new- 
packing and correcting any injury there 
may be in the face of the flange, some 
engineers will keep on in a bullheaded 
way straining the bolts until the flange 
either breaks under this strain or later 
under the expansion and contraction, 
and then they will seek^to place the re- 
sponsibility on the manufacturer by 
raising a question as to the quality of 
the goods or packing. 

CLOSET TANK LININGS. 

Plumbers quite generally throughout 
the country are now called on to re- 
line water closet tanks, says the Metal 
Worker. AVhen the tank is taken out 
and the lining put in the cost is not 
endured without complaisance by the 
customer. Plumbers are willing to con- 
fess that they desire to procure goods 
as cheaply as possible, but are equally 
desirous that they shall be of such a 
quality as will not bring complaint from 
customers. In many of the tanks sent 
out by the supply houses the lining is 
of hard rolled copper and very light. 
The tank lining should have a greater 
thickness and probably would be better 
if it were of soft copper. The hard cop- 
per draws away from the sides of the 
tank when its contents are emptied, 
making a movement at the sharp bends 
in the corners which not infrequently 
leads to buckles and breaks. The hard 
copper is particularly weak at the 
seams and at the point of the connec- 
tion of the outlet piping. Here the na- 
tural movement of copper, when the 
tank is filling and emptying, results in 
a break around the outlet which ex- 
perienced plumbers think could be 
avoided if soft copper was used. If 
these same plumbers were called upon 
to reline tanks they would use heavier 
soft material, and when they do they 
have lit lie complaint in respect to the 
service rendered. Some plumbers go 
so far as to. take the thin lining out of 
a new tank' before it goes into the house 
and reline it with heavier soft material, 
throwing' the old lining into the old 
metals for sale. This custom is eon- 
lined to no one section, and flie plumb- 
ers feel that it is lime for the manufac- 
turers to pay less attention to the de- 
mand for lower cost and put a lining 
in their tanks which will insure more 
satisfaelory service. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Plumbing Markets 



MONTREAL. 

Office of Hakdwark and Mktai., 
232 UoOUl Street, 

Montreal, Janmiry 4. 1907 

"Never busier," is the erj everj 

where. This condition "I afl'aiiv has 

not been equalled in l his city for years. 

Slink taking has no! marred in anj way 

the rush of orders. The old year died 
with a smiling and prosperous lace. 

The advance in iron piping is si ill 
in the future, but it is believed to be 

near. 

RANGE BOILERS There is a 
good demand and the follow- 
ing prices are, well maintained: 
Iron clad, 30 gallon, $5 ; 40 gal- 
lon, $6.50 net list. Copper, 30 gallon, 
$25; 35 gallon, $29.50; 40 gallon, $32 
net. 

LEAD PIPE — Primary markets are 
still rising, and pipe is firmer. 
We still quote 5 per cent, discount 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, St. John. 
N.B., Halifax: f.o.b., London, 15c per 
hundred lbs extra; f.o.b. Hamilton, 10c 
per hundred lbs. extra. 

II JON PIPE FITTINGS— The usual 
trade is being done at unchanged prices, 
we quote: Discounts on nipples, 1-4 inch 
to 3 inch, 75 per cent., 3*4 inch to 2 
inch, 55 per cent. 

[RON PIPE. — Supplies continue 
short and an advance is expected. 
We still continue to quote as follows: 
Standard pipe in lots of 100 feet, 
regular lengths, 1-1 inch, $5.50 ; 3-8 
inch, $5.50 ; 1-2 inch, $8.50 ; 3-4 
inch, 11.50 ; 1 inch, $16.50 ; 1 1-4 
inches, $22.50 ; 1 1-2 inches, $27.00 ; 
2 inches, $36.50, discounts on 
black pipe, 1-4 inch, 61 per cent.; 3-8 
inch, 61 per cent.; 1-2 inch, 70 per- 
cent.; 3-4 inch and upwards, 72 per 
cent.; Discounts on galvanized pipe: 1-4 
inch, 46 per cent.; 3-8 inch, 46 per cent.; 
1-2 inch, 60 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe of 100 feet lots are quoted as fol- 
lows: 1-2 inch, $12; 3-4 inch, $15; 1 
inch, $22; 1 1-4 inches, $30; 1 1-2 inches, 
$3G; 2 inches, $50. The discount for 
black pipe is 70 per cent., and for gal- 
vanized 60 per cent. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS— Our 
prices remain as follows: Standard 
soil pipe, 50 per cent. oft list. 
Standard fittings, 50 and 10 per cent, off 
list; medium and extra heavy soil pipe. 
GO per cent. off. Fittings, GO per cent, 
off. 

SOLDER— Quotations arc unchanged. 
Our prices are: Bar solder, half- 
and-half, guaranteed, 25c; No. 2 wiping 
solder, 22c. 

ENAMELWARE.— We still quote: 
Canadian bath tubs, plate El. 
5 ft 1st quality, $20.65 special, $18.65; 
plate Ell and E21 5 ft., 1st 
quality, $19.50, special $17.15; plate 
E35, 5 ft., 1st quality, $24.65, special 



$22.40. American baths, rolled rim, 5 
feet ■_' l 2 inch rim, $22.2a|; 3 Lnoh 
rim, $29.25. Lavatories, discounts, 1st 
quality, .30 to 30 ami 5 per cent. . 

cial, :;o ami in to 10 pei cent. Sinks, 
is x ;;n inch, ilai rim, 1st quality, $2.60, 

special. $2. !.">. 



TORONTO. 

Oflleeoi II a new a UK am. Mktai., 
10 FtodI Street But, 

Toronto, Jen 4, 18.7. 

The advance on hot water boilers, 
spoken of in our report a fortnight ago, 
has not yet been announced, hut the 
new figures are expected to be made 

known next week. With prices of iron 
.■u their present high pitch, advanced 
prices on boilers were looked for and 
would have been made some time ago, 

except for the keen competition exist- 
ing between the various producers. 

Soil pipe is holding lirm at the ad- 
vanced prices, and there is talk of still 
higher quotations being made this 
month. 

We report Ibis week additional ad- 
vances on compression and fuller work, 

the advance averaging about 10 per 

cent. 

Ik n pipe is still short and there does 
no! seem to be any prospeel of stocks 
being gathered by jobbers during the off 
^< ason. On the other hand, there is 
much reason to expect that a shortage 
will continue throughout the coming 
year. One Toronto house has secured 
a large supply of one and one ami one- 
quarter black pipe from United States 
producers, and are selling it at bare 
cost to oblige customers who have not 
been able to secure material for jobs 
under way. 

Trade in both plumbing and heating 
supplies has been slow, the holiday sea- 
son and the natural falling off of trade 
at the beginning of the year, making 
this condition an expected one. 

LEAD PIPE — The discount on lead 
pipe continues at 5 per cent, on the list 
price of 7c. per pound. Lead waste, 8c. 
per pound with 5 off. Caulking lead 
5 3-4c. to 6c. per pound. Traps and 
bends, 50 per cent., discount. 

si ill, PIPE AM» FITTINGS. New 
i i - t -, will show advances as follows : 
Medium and extra heavy pipe and fit- 
tings, 60 pel cent. ; tight pipe 50 per 
cent.; light fittings, 50 and in per cent.; 
7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 per cent. 

IRON PIPE.— American black pipe 
has been received in Toronto to relieve 
the shortage, but it commands higher 

57 



price- than we ;irc quotil I .idian 

L-im ilacl dpi quoted at 

and oa alvanized 

Pull list in current market quotations. 
IKON PIPE FITTINGS - New 

lists are as follows: Cast iio 

. tecs, crosses, etc,, 62 j pel cent ; 
iron plugs and bushings, 62j pel 
cent.; flange unions, 62} per cent.; nip- 
ples, 70 and 10 per cent.; iron cocks, :'..") 
and 5 per cent ; ( anadian malleal ' 
per cent.; malleable unions, 55 and 5 pei 
cent.; malleable bushings, 55 

iron ceiling plates, nlain 65 per 
I iron floor, ."U | hool 

plates, 80 per cent.; expansion pi 

65 per cent.; headers, 60 pei cent, bang 

ers, 65 per cent.; standard list. 

GALVANIZED IKON RANGE BOIL 
KRS — We quote: 12 gallon capacity, 

(laid, $1.50, e.xtia heavy, $6.50; 18 
gallon standard, $4.75 ; extra I. 
$6.75 ; 24 gallon, standard, $4.75; ex 
Ira heavy, $0.75; 30 gallon, standard, 
$4.75 ; extra heavy, $7.50: 35 gallon, 
standard, $5.75; extra heavy, $8.50; H) 
gallon, standard, $6.75; 40 gallon, ex- 
tra heavy, $9.50; 52 gallon, $11; ex- 
tra heavy, $14; 66 gallon, standard, 
$18; extra heavy, $20 ; 82 gallon, 
standard, $21; extra heavy, $24; 100 
gallon, standard, $29; extra heavy, $34; 
L20 gallon, standard, $34; extra heavy, 
$40; 144_ gallon, standard, $47 ; extra 
heavy, $55. Copper range boilers are 
now net list. 

RADIATORS— Prices are verv stiff at: 
Ilct water, 47^ per cent.; steam, 50 per 
cent.; wall radiators, 45 per cent.; 
specials, 45 per cent. Hot water boil- 
ers have not yet advanced. 

SOLDER — Quotations remain firm 
as follows: Bar solder, half-and- 
half, guaranteed, 27c; wiping, 23c. 

ENAMELWARE- We quote as fol- 
lows: Standard Ideal. Plate El, 5 ft.. 
first quality, $21.65; special $20.25 ; 
plate Ell, 5 ft., first quality, $20.15, 
special, $19.75. Lavatories, first qual- 
ity, 20 and 10 to 30 and 10 off; special, 
30 and 5 to 30 and 10 per cent, discount 
Kitchen sinks, plate 300, firsts, 65 and 
5 off, specials, 70 per cent. Urinals and 
rang-e closets, 20 off. Fittings extra. 
Lower prices in quantities. 

HOT-WATER HEATING DEVICE. 

Two Danes have taken out American 
patents for a circulation device for hot- 
water heating plairts, which the\ 

crib'e as follows: Hot-water beating 

t ants in which air is blown into a 
tnain rising-pipe in order to increase 
.the circulation of water in the pipe ays- 
tem are well known. The object of the 
existing patents in this line is Mo pro- 
duce a circulation as powerful as pos- 
sible in proportion to energy e.xp 
ed and in such manner that the sys- 
does not lose heat and so that tin 
of air does not cause special difficulty. 

WALL RADIATORS POPULAR. 
Wall radiation for semi-public placo^ 
is finding favor with heating cor' 

not only on account, of the econo- 
my of installation, but because of n^ 
thermal efficiency as well. Tt poss^ 
many advantages over the older I. 
for use in stores, railway stations, and 
bowling alleys. 






PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



THE NEW 

"SOLID-ADJUSTABLE" 
HAND STOCK AND DIES 




At prices that will warrant your 
inquiries. 

I. E. SHANTZ & CO. 



BERLIN, 



ONTARIO 



Selling Agents for Canada 



II 


Time and 




«r ^srliiS^ 


f 2 Trouble 




fJ§T\ 


Saved 




1 1 f^y^ j-^j 

Hl v v // 


by using Armstrong's 
Ratchet Attachment for 
threading pipes in 
cramped positions. Fits 
all Genuine Armstrong 
Stocks — is moderate in 
cost, compact, strong 
and thoroughly reliable 
- an invaluable tool for 
pipe-fitters. Write for 
catalog and prices. 




II 


THE ARMSTRONG MFG. CO. 

292 Knowllon St., 
Bridgeport. Conn. 





DISAPPOINTMENTS 

Are never attached to orders entrusted to me. I make it my 
business to be prompt in filling customers wants. 

I can be prompt in filling your orders for Enamelware, Heating 
Goods, etc. 

MAKE IT A POINT TO WRITE ME 



ORLANDO VICKERY 

178-180 Victoria Street TORONTO, CANADA 



" Diamond Brand " Fittings 

are pronounced the best for 
many reasons. Here are three: 

The Finish is Smooth— The Threads are Perfect— The Material is 

the Best Obtainable 

OSHAWA STEAM & GAS FITTINGS CO., 

OSHAWA, CANADA UMITED 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from the principal Dealers in Glass, Hardware, and Painters' Supplies. 
Contractors to H. IYI. Government and the principal English Sheet and Plate Glass 

Works 




IT COSTS NOTHING IF IT 
DOESN'T SATISFY 

STERNE'S 

ASBESTOS STOVE AND 

FURNACE CEMENT 

You order on approval. 

We take the chances— not you 

6. F. STERNE & SON, Manufacturers 

BRANTFORD, ONT. 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 




goes with even' MERRELL PORTABLE HAND 
MACHINE, PIPE THREADING and CUTTING 
MACHINE. We build them that way. 

For doing all kinds of threading— under ALL con- 
ditions — labor trouble and faulty material included 
—where speed, durability and ease of control count 
fi r something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. 

Whether it be stationary or portable — hand or 
power driven— 30 DAYS FREK TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your choice should be the 
MEKRELL. 

This Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-off Knife. 

Let u« tell you more about this machine— The 
Chasers, ViBe and the large range of work covered. 

Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

m CANADIAN FAIRBANKS GO. 

Solo Agents for Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



When You Buy f 
Demand Proof 

Don't take any substitute for j| 

Glauber Brass goods. Make the g 

salesman show you. Brass has * 

gone up no less than fifteen per £ 

cent., and if you don't get proofs p 

before you buy you take chances $ 

of getting something less than 5 
you pay for. 

WE GIVE YOU THE PROOF | 

and 2 Cocks Free for any % 

one sent you defective. «c 



| Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., f 

5 Expert Makers of Plumbers' Fine Brass Goods 5 

CLEVELAND, 0. | 

Forwell Foundry Co. 

BERLIN, ONT. 

Manufacturers ot 

SOIL PIPE, FITTINGS, and CAST IRON SINKS 

Aak Jobbtrsfor Hf, F. GO." BrBnd 



58 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



An Invitation 



is extended to the Trade to inspect our com- 
prehensive stock of Daisy Water Heaters. 
When your customer experiences the need of a 
greater Hot Water supply remember that we 
carry every size and style of heater in stock for 
immediate shipment. 




CLUFF BROTHERS 

Selling Agents for WARDEN FLING & SON, Limited 

Lombard Street, TORONTO 



1906 



Improved "INTERNATIONAL" BURNER 



1907 




i2!"i«*M£C<V 



Mui«u(NAM6e^ 




SaejLt Valve 




TRY A SAMPLE DOZEN 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



GA^ fJfcOVLA.r<>H 




+S&P 



•O£0l£ Valv£ 
lt»T»l«.K (,Atrt£.T 



He*vY i v «uHLto 




THREE FINISHES 


CLOSED OR OPEN 


BASKET 




per no/.. 


Polished Brass 


$4 25 


Brushed Brass 


4 90 


Oxidized Copper - 


4 50 


Deck Plates - 


15 



(o*">(.tre £Tm.oa 



(oiCLfcre jeLfioKAi Vic* Cf 8u*»t(\ 



eUNSCN 



The most Scientific Burner on the market to- 
day- Nothing to equal it in efficiency or 
appearance 

AN ORNAMENT IN THE MOST ARTISTIC HOME 

Leather Packing or Gasket makes it absolutely 
impossible for any leakage of gas from the 
needle valve adjustment. Cannot light back 
into the bunsen or puff out when lit. The 
accompanying detailed sketch cannot fail to 
convince the most skeptical of its many 
advantages over every other burner on the 
market. 



Manufactured H pressiy for and con. j^q I n te mat i o nal Gas Appliance Co., Limited 

trolled In Canada, Great Britain and ' * ' 

United States by 535, 537 and 539 Queen St. Esat, TORONTO, CAN. 



PLUMBING AND STEAM FITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



Fairbanks Standard 
Scales 



THE WORLD'S STANDARD 

FOR ALMOsr .\ CENTURY 



Fairbanks Cement 
Testing Apparatus 




The latest device for testing the 
tensile strength of cement 



The Canadian Fairbanks Go,, Limited 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 



Horse Shoers' Foot Vise 
and Bolt Header 




A Practical Tool and a Time-saver for the Busy 
Blacksmith 

Manufactured by 

THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., 



LONDON, CANADA 



Limited 




The Ever Ready 
Dry Battery 

FOR AUTOMOBILE and 



GASOLINE ENGINE USE 



Write for Prices 



JOHN FORM AN 

248 and 250 Craig St. W., MONTREAL, - Que. 




HOTTEST ON EARTH 

. . . ■ . - — 

Our Bonanza Furnaces %2ZZZ 

heat with less fuel than any other make. Jobbers sell at 
.n^jjj factory prices. Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 

<? No. 38— Price, each, $7.80 net. 

No. 39— One size smaller, $5.85 net. 



THE TURNER BRASS WORKS 

53 MICHICAN STREET, CHICAGO, U.8.A. 

BO 




Kerr's Standard and 
Jenkin Disc Radiator Valves 

are perfectly constructed, and of beauti- 
ful design. Like all " Kerr" specialties, 
strictly high-grade 

The KERR ENGINE CO., 

Manufacturers Limited 



WALKERVILLE 



ONTARIO 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



BMHOMil 



Stocked by all leading: 

jobbers throughout 

the country 



E^^iWilWII 




Hardware dealers should 

specify our goods in 

order tc get 

the best 



lr^w\ Plain Engine Lubricator 
with or without Drain 
and Tube, extra heavy 



AUTOMOBILE 
BRASSES 



We want to impress upon every dealer the advant- 
ages of selling Penberthy Injectors. They have 
been before the public so long and have given such 
splendid satisfaction, that it simply means "wrap- 
ping it up" for your customer — and a good substant- 
ial profit on your investment. Nething to charge to 
time lost talking something just as good. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

PENBERTHY INJECTOR GO, 

LIMITED 

WINDSOR, ONT. 




Plain Steam Whistles 
with heavy valve 



GAS ENGINE 
BRASSES 




MUELLER FULLER BIBBS 

STANDARD PATTERN 




No rough or sharp seat edges to cut the 
ball. Deep seat with rounded edges, 
and surface curved to conform to the 
shape of the ball. Plain or for hose and 
all styles of pipe connection. 

UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO. 



Decatur, III., U.S.A. 



New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 



Hardware and Plumber— 




We have pumps duit- 
able to any demand mnse 
upon you by most exatc 
ing customers. 

Our pumps will do 
anything that a pump 
can do, and we will be 
pleased to give the 
benefit of many years' 
experience to any one 
having pump troubles. 

McDougall Pumps are 
Standard Pumps, and 
with us it is quality first, 
last and always, while we 
ask just as little money 
as we can get along with. 

We have a Tew catalogues 
for distribution • 



The R. McDougall Co., Limited 



CALT, 



CANADA 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



nil IT TAkIMP PHANPF^ ^ ou can 't cari 7 on an > T kind of business campaign to a 

(£UI I HiVinU UllnliULO successful issue — unless you are certain about your base of 

supplies. When you place an order with us you take out an insurance policy guaranteeing success. 

Quality trade -building quality is Btamped through and through our 

READY ROOFING, TARRED FELTS, SHEATHING, WRAPPING AND BUILDING PAPERS 



These are our brands 

BLACK DIAMOND" 

^w "JOLIETTE" 

^£\~7fo> AND and 

^^J!P^ "CYCLONE" 

^^ SHEATHING 
TARRED FELT 



QUALITY and PRICE always right 

ALEX. HcARTHUR & CO., Limited, Montreal 



8a ricOILL STREET 



F. J. C. COX, Winnipeg, Sole Agent for Northwest Provinces. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. 4, 1907. 
Thtte prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. Ihe 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

ANTIMONY. 

Halletts per lb... 271 28 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned. \ 35 per cen t. off list. 

Spun 1 

BABBIT METAL. 

Canada Metal Conipany-Imr>eri»l.genuine. 
60c ; Imperial Tough, 6G<- ; White Brass 50c; 
Metallic. 35c. ; Harris Heavy Pressure, 25c.; 
Hercules, 25c; Wnite Bronze, 15c; Star 
Frictionlesa, 14c; Alluminoid, lCc; No. 4, 
Sic. per lb. 

James Robertson Company — Extra Mon- 
arch. 45c; No. 1 Monarch 3ic ; King 
Anti-friction. 20c ; Fleur-de-lis Anti-friction, 
lie ; No. 1 Thurber, 12c ; Philadelphia 10c; 
Canadian, 7c; Hardware babbit No. 1, 10c ; 
Hardware babbit No. 2, 8c ; Hardware babbit 
No. 3, 6Jc DiscountonHardwareNo. 1,2, i, 
15 per cent. All others net list. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, net list. 

Sheet*. 12 to 14 in 27 

Tubing, base, per lb 1 to 2 in ■» 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lot* 2150 26 00 

Bars. 

Cut lengths, round, J to 2 in 32 00 

Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 .... 30 00 

Plain. 14oz 3100 

Tinned copper sheet, base 33 00 

Planished base 37 00- 

Braziers' (in sheet*). 4x6 ft., 25 

to 30 lb. each, per lb., base 30 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

8tol0gauge 2 60 2 60 

12 gauge 2 60 2 65 

14 K " 2 60 2 60 

17 ■• " 2 40 2 50 

18 '■ 2 40 2 55 

20 " ' 2 40 2 55 

22 " " 2 40 2 70 

24 " 2 45 2 75 

26 " 2 55 2 85 

23 " 2 60 3 (.0 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 3 00 

All bright " 4 01 

Galvanized Canada Plat es,52 sheet* 4 35 

" 60 " 4 60 

Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

Galvanized sheets. 

Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown. 
16 to 20 gauge 3 60 3 1)5 

22 to 24 gauge 3 95 4 00 

28 " .. 4 30 4 20 

28 " • • 4 45 4 50 

Apollo. 

10J oz. (American gauge) 4 60 

28 gauge " 4 40 

26 " " 4 00 

24 " " 3 80 



Queen's 
Comet Head. Bell. 

16 to 20 gauge 3 60 3 75 .... 

22 to 24 gauge 3 75 3 93 .... 

26 " 4 30 4 45 .... 

28 " 4 45 4 60 4 45 

Less than case lots 10 to 25o. extra. 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto- 
Common bar, per 100 lb 2 15 2 25 

Forged iron " 2 40 

Refined " " 2 55 70 

Horseshoe iron " 2 55 2 7u 

Hoop steel, 1 j to 3 in. base 2 80 

Sleigh shoe steel " .... 2 25 2 30 

Tire steel 2 40 2 50 

Best sheet cast steel 12 

B. K. Morton "Alpha " high speed. 65 

" annealed 70 

"M" Self-hsrdening 50 

"J" quality, best warranted 18 

"I" " warranted 14 

" B.C " quality 09 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel.. . . 10 20 

"Novo" 65 

" " annealed .... 65 

Jowett & Son? B P.L. foolsteel.... 10i 

INGOT TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $46 50 $47 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.LS., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

10,14 x20base 86 50 

IX, 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX, 14x20base 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

IC, 14x20base 6 50 

1 X. 14x20 " .... 8 00 

IXX,14x20base 9 50 

Ravea and Vulture Grades — 

I C, 14 x 20 base 5 00 

IX " 6 00 

IXX " 7 00 

IXXX" 800 

"Dominion Crown Best" — Double 

Coated, Tissued. Per box. 

I C, 14x20 base 5 75 

IX, 14x20 " 6 75 

IXX, 14x20" 7 75 

"Allaway a Best "—Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 4 50 

I X. 14 x 20 ' 5 25 

IXX, 14x20 " 6 00 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel — 

I.C., 14x20 base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 8 00 

IX., Teme Tin 9 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bin. 1 

" 14x60, " > .... 7 50 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 50 

" 26 " 9 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 5 40 5 50 

Bar, '• 5 75 6 00 

Sheets, 21 lb. sq. ft., by roll 06} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note. — Cut sheet* Jc. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weight* per yard, lists at 7c 
per lb. and 5 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note. — Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft lengths, list* at 8c. 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 8 CK> 8 25 

Part casks 8 25 8 50 

02 



ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 7 25 7 50 

Domestic 7 00 7 25 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 

BRASS GOODS, VALVE", ETO. 

Standard Compression work, dis. half inch 50 
per cent., others 40 per cent. 

Cushion work, discount 40 per cent. 

Fuller work, 1-inch fO per cent., others 50 p.c 

Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 50 
per Beet. ; roundway, 45 per cent. 

J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 50 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves 
discount 521 per cent. 

Kerr standard globes, angles and checks, 
special, 421 per cent.; standard, 471 P-c. 

Kerr Jenkins' disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, 45 per cent. 

Kerr steam radiator valves 60 p.c, and quick- 
opening hot-water radiator valveB, 60 p.c 

Kerr brass, Weber's straightway valves, 
421 per cent. ; straightway valves, LB. B.M., 
60 percent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves, discount 50 per cent 

Standard Radiator Valves, 60 per cent. 

Patent Quick - Opening Valves. K5 per cent. 

Jenkins' Bros. Globe Angle and Check Valves 
discount 32$ per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 2 00 

No. 4 " "......" 1 90 

No 7 Fuller's " 2 V5 

No. 4J, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold, per dci., $16.20 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brasB cocks, discount 50 percent. 
" " iron " " 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

BOILERS— COPPER RANGE. 

Copper, 30 gallon 25 00 

r ' 35 " 29 00 

" 40 " 33 00 

Net list. 

BOILERS— GALVANIZED IRON RANGE. 

Capacity. Standard. Extra heavy 

30-gallons.... 4.75 7.50 

35 " .... 5.75 850 

40 " .... 6.75 9.50 

2 per cent., 30 days 

BATH TUBS. 

Steel clad copper lined, 15 per cent. 

CAST IRON SINKS. 

16x24, $1; 18x30, $1 ; 18x36, $1.30. 

ENAMELED CLOSETS AND URINALS 

Discount 20 p.c. 

ENAMELED BATHS. 

Standard Ideal Enameled. 

Plate EI, Fittings extra let quality Special 

4 and 41 ft. 3 in. rolled rim. .$21 65 20 25 

5 feet " ..22 65 21 25 
51 " " .. 24 15 22 75 

6 " . . 26 90 25 50 
Plate E II 

5 feet 21 in. " . . 21 15 19 75 

51 " 21 " " .. 22 65 21 25 

Closer prices and discounts in quantities. 

ENAMELED LAVATORIES. 

1st quality. Special. 

Plate E 100 to E 103 . 20 & 10 p.c. 30 & 5 p.c. 

" E104toE132 30&10p.c. 40 p.c. 

ENAMELED SINKS. 

1st quality. Special. 
Plate E 201, one piece. . . . 20 p.c. 20 410 p.c. 
Plate E, flat iron 300,65 4 5 p.c. 70 p.c. 



LEAD PIPE 
Lead Pipe, 7c per pound, 5 per cent. off. 
Lead waste, 8c. per pound, 5 per cent. off. 
Caulking lead, 6c per pound. 
Traps and bends, 50 and 10 per cent. 

IRON PIPE. 



1 



Galvanized 

3 02 

3 02 

3 48 

4 47 

6 43 

8 77 

10 53 

14 04 

30 36 

39 94 

50 50 

57 42 



Size (per 100 ft.) Black. 

1 inch 2 20 1 inch. 

2 20 J " . 

2 63 J " . 

3 33 J " . 

4 80 1 " . 

i " 6 52 1} " . 

1} " 7 83 11 " , 

5 " IC 41 2 " . 

21 " 20 59 21 " , 

3 " 27 06 3 " . 

3J " 34 32 31 " , 

4 " 38 63 4 " , 

2 per cent. 30 days. 

Malleable Fittings — Canadian discount 30 per 

cent. ; American discount 25 per cent. 
Oast Iron Fittings 621 : Standard bushings 621 
per cent.; headers. 60 ; flanged unions 62*, 
malleable bnnhings 55 ; nipples, up to 2 
in.. 70 and 10 per cent ; up to 6 in., 65 
per cent.; malleable lipped unions, 55 and 
5 per cent. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and E ctra heavy pipe and fittings, 

up to 6 iui h, ducount 60 per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 
Light pipe, 50 p.c. ; fittings, 50 and 10 p.c. 
OAKUM. 

Plumbera ... per 10J lb 4 00 4 75 

RADIATOR", ETC. 

Hot water 47% p.c. 

Steam 50 p.c. 

Wall Radiators and Specials 45 p.c. 

STOVES, BOILERS, FURNACES, REGISTERS. 

Discounts vary from 40 to 70 per cent, 
according to list. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American disoount 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

i-lb per lb. 

1-lb. or over " 

SOLDER. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 25 27 
Wiping 22 23 



37 

34 

Per lb. 



PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins, pure 08 

Chrome yellow 15 

Golden ochre " 08 

French " " .... 08 

Marine black " 041 

Chrome green .... 10 

French permanent green" .... 13 

Signwriters' black " 15 

GLAZIER POINTS. 

Discount, 5 per cent. 

GLUE. 

Domestic sheet 10 101 

French medal 12 14 

PARIS GREEK. 

Bergers Canadian 

6001b. casks 23} S31 

250 lb. drums 231 231 

100-lb. " 24 24 

51'-lb. " 54 24 

25-lb. " 241 24, 

lib. pkgs, 1C0 in box 25 25 

Mb. " 50 " 251 

lib. tins, 10) " 2'. 26 

Mi-lb. pkgs 27 27 

2 p. c. 3 J days from date of shipment. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLAUSS BRAND BARBER'S SHEARS 



Fully Warranted. 



Solid Steel and Steel Faced. Hand forged 
from Finest Steel. These Shears are es- 
pecially tempered for the purpose they are 
intended. 

FULL NICKEL PLATE FINISH. Write for Trade Discounts 

The Clauss Shear Co., - Toronto, Ont 




PREPARED PAINTS. 

Pure, per gallon, In I in < 

Second qualities per gallon.. .... 

Barn(inbbls.) 60 

Sherwin-Williams paint? ,J gal 

igal 

" " gal 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 

Standard Co. 'a " New Era .... 

Benj. Moors Co.'s "Ark Bd — 
" British Navy deck — 
Hrandram- Henderson "Anchor" 

Kaoisay 8 paints, Pure, Der gal 

Thistle, " 
■ Outside, bbls 55 

Martin-Senour's 100 p.c. pure,} gal. 
" 4 gal. 
•■ f gal. 
.lamieson's "Crown and Anchor" 

Jamieson's floor enamel •• 

" barn paints, bbls. per gal. 

Honour's Floor Paints gal 

Sanderson Pearcy's, pure 

Robertson's pure paints 

PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 

Bulk in less quantitv 

Bladders in bbls 

Bladders in Kegs, boxes or loose 

251b. tins , 

12i lb. tins v;aa;:- 

Bladders in hulk or tins less than 100 lb. 
Bulk in 100-lb. irons 



1 20 

1 00 

90 

1 i i 
1 45 
1 40 
1 30 
1 30 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 45 
1 40 
1 35 
1 20 
1 50 

60 

1 20 
1 20 
1 20 



1 50 

) 80 
1 80 
1 95 

1 80 

2 05 
1 85 
1 80 



DRY LEAD. wnite re d 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 6 75 6 00 



Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " i 50 
No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt . 
No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt . 



6 25 

5 75 

6 00 



SHELLAC. 

Shellac, bleached, in bars or ground, 46c. per 
lb., f.o.b. Eastern Canadian Points. 

Shellac, bone dry, 57c. per lb, f.o.b.. Eastern 
Canadian Points; 63c, Toronto. 

Shellac, T N. orange, etc.,48o. net, Toronto^ 

WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. Per 100 lbs. 

Pure 7 25 7 50 

\o. 1 6 90 7 15 

No 2 6 55 6 90 

No. 3 6 30 6 55 

Above prices are f.o b. Montreal. 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 50 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure — 7 25 

Monarch 7 40 

Standard Decorator's 7 15 

Essex Genuine 6 80 

Brandram's B. B. Genuine 8 25 

" Anchor," pure 6 50 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 6 40 

Ramsay's Exterior 6 15 

"Crown and Anchor," pure 6 50 

■ Sanderson Pearcy's 7 40 

Robertson's C. P., lead 7 20 

WINDOW GLAnS. 

Size United Double 

Inches. Star Diamond 

Under 26 $4 25 $6 25 

26 to 40 4 65 6 75 

41to50 5 10 7 50 

51 to 60 5 35 8 50 

61 to 70 5 75 9 75 

71 to 80 6 25 11 00 

81 to 85 7 00 12 50 

86 to 90 15 00 

91 to 95 17 50 

96 to 100 20 50 

101 to 105 24 00 

100 to 110 27 50 

Discount off list, 20 per cent. For broken 
boxes 40 off. All prices per 100 feet. 

ZINC— DRY WHITE. 

Extra Red Seal 07 08 

French V. M 06 25 

Lehigh 05 06 

ZINC-GROUND WHITE. 

Pure 084 094 

No. 1 07 08 

No. 2 05J C 06; 



VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 '-0 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 150 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 U JU 

Elasticoak •■■• J ™ 

Furniture, extra 110 J » 

No 1 C 90 1 00 

Hardoilfinish 135 150 

Lightoilfinish 160 170 

Damar } 75 2 00 

Brown japan 110 1 '0 

Black japan 1 10 1 20 

•« No. 1 85 90 

Elastilite vamish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine "oor vamish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 1.20 

size 2, 70c.; size 3, 40c. each. 

Sberwin-WilliamB' kopal varnish, gal., 2.50 

Cauada Paint Cos sun vamish 2 DO 

" Kyanize " Interior Finish 2 40 

" Flint-Lac." coa'-h 180 

" Gold Medal," per gal., in cases . . 2 00 

Jamieson's Copaline, per gal 2 00 

Sanderson Pearcy's amberine 2 50 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE. 

BELLS. 
Brass hand tells, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Gongs, Sargeants door bells.. 5 50 8 00 
Peterboro' door bells, discount 37$ and 10 

per cent, off new list. 
American, house bells, per lb. 35 40 

BUILDING PAPER, ETO. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 2 25 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 95 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 20 

Carpet Felt per ton 55 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Surprise 40 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 50 

Tar " " 400 " 45 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. fcl. X. L..« " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized T " 400 '' 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 90 

Slater's felt per roll 70 

Heavy Straw Sheathing f. o. b. St. 

John and Halifax 37 50 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Wrought Iron, 70 per cent. 
Oast Iron Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent. 
Wrought Steel Fast Joint and Loose Pin, 
70 per cent. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK. 

" Lafarge " cement in wood 3 40 

" Lehigh " cement, in wood 2 54 

" Lehigh " cement, cotton sacks 2 39 

" Lehigh " cement, paper sacks 2 31 

Fire brick (Scotch) per 1,100. ... 15 00 24 00 

Fire clay (Scotch|, net ton 4 95 

Paving Blocks per 1.000. 
Blue metallic, 9"x4'"x3", ex wharf . . 35 00 
Stable pavers, 12"xG"x2", ex wharf . . 50 00 
Stable pavers, 9"x44'x3", ex wharf . . 36 00 

DOOR SETS. 

Peterboro, 374 ar| d 10 per cent. 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 1 65 

English " 2 00 4 00 

Chicago and Reliance Coil Door Springs, 25 
per cent. 

STORE DOOR HANDLES. 

Per Dozen 1 00 1 50 



ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 
Peterboro, 374 and 10 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per oent. 
Brass, 45 per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, discount 60 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. net. . 06J 
" " 5-in., " ...... 06 

6-in., " 052 

" " 8-in., " 054 

" 10-in. and larger . . 05} 

Light T and strap, discount 65 o.c. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

under 12 in.... per 100 lb 4 75 

over 12 in " 3 75 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs .... 10 80 
Spring, Woodyatt pattern, per gro., No. 5, 
317.50 No. 10, $18 ; No. 20, $10.80 ; No. 
12 $20; No. 51. $10: No. 50. $27.50. 
Crate hinges and back Haps, 65 and 5 p. c. 
Hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

SPRIN'l HINGES. 

ChicagoSpring Butts and Blanks 124 percent. 
Triple End Spring Butts, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Chicago Floor Hinges, 40 and 5 off. 
Garden City Fire Engine House Hinges, 124 
per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Oast Iron. 

Bird sage per dor. 50 110 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought hooks and staples— 

} x 5 per gross .... 2 65 

5-16x5 ." .... 3 30 

Bright steel gate hooks and staples, 40 per 

cent, discount. 
Hat and coat wire, discount 624 per cent. 
Screw, bright wire, discount 62J-per oent. 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. k L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knoba per doz 2 00 

Peterboro knobs, 37J and 10 per cent. 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net list. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per ceni 
Cabinet trunk and padlock 

Ajnerican per gross 60 

LOCKS. 
Peterboro 37% and 10 per cent 
Riir»p11 * Erwin. steel rim $2.50 ne' do» 
Eagle cabinet locks, discount 30 per cent 
American padlocks, all steel, 10 to 15 per 

cent.; all brass or bronze, 10 to 25 per cut. 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. & A. sand, discount, 35 per cent 
Emery, discount 35 per oent. 
Garnet. (Rurton'el 5 to 10 per cent advance 
on list. 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 031 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

WROUGHT STAPLES. 

Galvanized 2 75 

Plain 250 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

Bright suear point, 75 per cent, discount. 



TOOLS AND HANDLES. 

ADZES. 
Discount 224 P«» cent. 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 
AXES. 

Single bit, per doz 5 5i 8 50 

Double bit" " WOO 1100 



Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 700 900 

Red Ridge, boyB', handled 5 75 

hunterB 5 25 

BITS. 
Irwin's auger, discount 474 rer cent. 
Gilmour's auger, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford auger, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 
Gilmour's cat, 474 percent. 
Clark's expansive, 40 per cent. 

Clark's gimlet, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail ind Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS 

German ner doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18 00 

CHALK. 
Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 
White lump per cwt. 60 



75 
65 



15 
224 
15 
20 



CHISELS. 

Wamock's, discount 724 per cent. 

P. S. & W. Extra, discount 72% per ot nt 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. s D., No. 3 per pair 

8. tD., " 5 fi 

S.4D., " 6 

Boynton pattern " 

CROWBARS. 

3'/2C to 4c. per lb. 

DRAW KNIVES. 
( ' tach and Wagon, discount 75 pet oent. 
Carpenters' discount 75 per cent 

DRILLS. 

Millar's Palls, hand and breast, net list 
North Bros. , each set, 50c. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 percent. 

Arcade 75 

Kearney 4 Foot 75 

Disston's 75 

American 75 

J. Barton Smith 75 

McCleUan 7i 

Eagle 75 

Nichol son 66i 

Globe 75 

Black Diamond. 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 274 per cent. 

GAUGES. 
Stanley s discount 50 to 60 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 ....each 1 65 2 40 

HANDLES. 

C & B., fork, 40 per cent., revised list. 
U, S B., hoe, 40 per cent., revised list. 

American, saw per doz .... 25 

American, plane ... per gross 3 15 3 75 
Canadian, hammer and hatchet 40 per cent 
Axe and cant hook handles, 45 per cent. 

HAMMERS. 

Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 25 to 274 Per cent. 

Magnetic tack per doz. 110 120 

Canadian sledge .... per lb. 07 084 
Cauadian lull pean, per lb. . . 22 25 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 424 P*' cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

•" " 2, " 4 85 

Barrel Underhill 5 00 

. MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory. i 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian pe' doz. 5 50 6 0C 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EVAPORATION REDUCED TO A MINIMUM 

is one of the reasons why PATERSON'S WIRE EDGED READY ROOFING 
will last longer than any other kind made. 

Mr. C. R. Decker, Chesterfield, Ont., used our 3 Ply Wire Edged Ready Roof- 
ing- fourteen years ago, and he says it is apparently just as good as when first put on. 

We have hundreds of other customers whose experience has been similar 
to Mr. Decker's. 

THE PATERSON MFG. CO., Limited, Toronto and Montreal 



MEAT CUTTERS. 

German, 15 per cent. 

American discount, 334 per cent. 

Qem each .... 115 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 85 2 50 

No. 1 85 

No 1573 75 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round and octagon, per gross 3 38 

Diamond 100 

PICES. A 

Per dozen 600 9 ^ 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent. 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fanoy Canadian or American 374 to 

40 per cent 
Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3 60, net list prices. 
PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz. 2 on 5 00 

Stanley, 2J inch, single 24c, double 39c. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button s genuine, 37i to 40 per cent. 
Button's imitation per doz. 5 00 9 00 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler s :per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid perset 72 

" hollow per inch .... 100 

RIVET 8ETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 
RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
[toit, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

SAWS. 

Atkins, hand and crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, discount 12J per cent 

Disston's Crosscut per foot 35 55 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

S. & D. solid tooth circular shingle, con- 
cave and band, 50 per cent ; mill and ice, 
drag, 30 per cent.; cross-cut, 35 per cent.; hand 
saws, butcher. 35 per cent. ; huck, New 
Century. 86.25; Luck. No. 1 Maple Leaf, 
$5.25 ; buck, Happy Medium. $4.25: buck, 
Watch Spring, $1.25; buck, common frame, 
$4.00. 

Spear & Jackson's saws— Hand or rip 26 in., 
$12.75; 23 in., $H.25; panel, 18 in., $8.25; 
20 in , $3 ; tenon, 10 in., $9.90 ; 12 in., $10.9J ; 
14 in, $11.50. 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X -Cut Bets. " 7 50 

Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 40 off. 
S. ft D. saw swages, 40 off. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 

North Bros., No. 30 . per doz 



1 no 
16 83 



SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

BullDog.solid neck shovel (No. 2 pol.).$18 50 
(Hollow Back) (Reinforced S Scoop.) 

Moose $17 50 $16 30 

Bear 15 00 15 3o 

Fox 12 50 14 30 

Black Cat.... 10 00 13 30 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SQUARES. 
Iron, discount 20 per cent. 
Steel, discount 65 and lu per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52, per cent. 
TAPE LtNEg. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Ohestermans each 90 2 85 

teel each 80 8 00 

TROWELS. 

Disston's. discount 10 per cent 
8. ft D., discount 35 per cent. 



FARM AND GARDEN GOODS 

BELLS. 

American cow bells, 63J per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
American, farm bells, each . . 1 35 3 00 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $1.30 for 24-inch, and $1.70 

CATTLE LEADERS. 
Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

BARN DOOR HANOERS. 

doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns wood track 4 50 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Acme, wood track 5 00 6 50 

Atlas 5 00 6 00 

Perfect 8 00 1100 

New Milo 6 50 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 3 75 

" li x 3-16 inflOO f t) .... 4 75 

Double strap hangers, doz. sets. ... 6 40 

Standard jointed hangers, " .... 6 40 

Steel King hangers " 6 25 

StormKingandsafetyhangers .... 7 00 

" rail 4 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 
Hangers, 5 per cent. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

S. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

" sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 

HAT KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

HEAD HALTERS. 

Jute Rope, 1-inch per gross 9 00 

" ,r \ " .... " .... 10 00 

" " I" .... " .... 12 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, li " " 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list ( Oval 
M.R.M. Co. brand, 55 per cent. 1 head 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 

M.R.M. Co. brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 
HORSK WEIGHTS. 
Taylor-Forbes, 3}c. per lb. 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 6 25 9 25 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 26 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1100 

STALL FIXTURES. 

Warden King, 35 per cent. 

WOOD HAY RAKES. 
Ten tooth, 40 and 10 per cent. 
Twelve tooth, 45 per cent. 



HEAVY GOODS NAILS, ETC. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's. 80-lb. and over 10} 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's. 80-lb. and over 11} 

Taylor- Forbes, handy 05 

VISES. 

Wright's 134 

Brook's 12! 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

r ' " " No. 2 5 50 

8»w Vise 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (discount) 45 per cent. 



BOLTS AND NUTS 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per cent. 

" " | and smaller.. 60, 10 -ind 10 

" " 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 50 

Machine Bolts, | and less 60 and 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 10 

Blank Bolts 55 

Bolt Ends 55 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, | and less . . 60 and 10 

" " '* 7-16 and larger 50 and 5 

Coach Screws, conepoint 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. peril off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4fc. per off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 54 to 6c. 
Stove Bolts, 75 per cent. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHER . 

Canadian'make discount 40 per cent. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, per 100 lb., 5-16 in., $4.40 ; j in., 
$3.90; 7-16 in , $3.70; \ in., $3.50; 9-16 in., 
$3 45; Sin., $3.35; \ in., $3.20; J in., $3.10; 
1 in., $3.10. 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain iron, discount 35 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, discount 40 per cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Pressed spikes, g diameter, per 100 lbs., $3.15 

NAILS. Cut. Wire. 

2d 3 80 3 30 

3d 2 95 2 95 

4 and 5d 2 70 2 70 

6and7d 2 60 2 60 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 45 

10andl2d 2 40 2 40 

16and20d 2 35 2 35 

30, 40, 50 and 60d( base) 2 30 2 39 

F.o.b. Montreal. Cut nails, Toronto 20c. 
higher. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 pe cent 
Coopers' nails, discount. 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, usual proportion burrs,27i P-O. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 15 per cent. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. pa-kages 

lc. per lb.; }-lb. packages 2c. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 4c. per lb. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 874 per cent, 

" R. II , bright, dis. 824 pe> cent. 

" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 

" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 

" F. H., bronze, dis. 75 percent. 

" R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Felister head, iron, discount 30 per cent, 
" " brass, discount 25 per cent. 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 5 

" " tinned 80 and 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 75 and 10 

i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk — 85 and 12J 
" brush, blued and tinned 
bulk 70 

64 



Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12 J 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKS 40 

Copper tacks 374 

Copper nails 42 j 

Trunk nails, black 65 

Trunk nails, tinned and blued . . 65 

Clout nails, blued and tinned . . 65 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

in bulk 15 

solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle naile, in papers 10 

11 " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zino glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

" " " bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duok rivets 45" 

Cheese box tacks, 85 and 5 ; trunk tacks, 80 

and 10. 



CUTLERY AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 

AMMUNITION. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

American $2.00 per 1000. 

C. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000 

CARTRIDGES. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Rim Fire PiBtol. discount 30 and 5 per cent, 
American. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, uld 10 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol and rifle 
Dominion, 30 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. , American 
10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, Crown, 25 and 
5 : Sovereign, 25, 10 and 10 ; Renal, 25, 10 
and 5 ; Imperial, 25, 10 and 5. American 
20 per cent, discount. Rival and Nitro, 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Empty paper shells Dominion, 25 off and 
empty brass Bhells, 55 per cent. off. Am- 
erican, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

PrimerB, Dom., 35 per cent : American $2 05 
Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lh. bags $0 70 

BeBt thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 eaoh, 10 gauge 35 

Ihin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 eaoh, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1.0C0 

each, lOgauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7aud 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " • 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,T 1 65 

5 and 9 " 1 90 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.50 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $8.50 net 
list. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, 
Montreal, St. John and Halifax. Terms, 

p.c. for cash in thirty days. 

razors. per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade ft Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Wilkinson's 12 50 

Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter' 8 50 10 50 
Clauss Razors and Strops, 50 and 10 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



\A/o mak! 



lectric Fixtures, SooPcots, and Cut-Outi 




lectrical Supplies of all kinds. 



MONTREAL. 



No Waste Circulation in HARDWARE AND metal. Try 
#vo vva&ic \*irt,uitiiiun the << want columns » and see . 



PLATF.n noons 
Hollowwaro, 40 per cent, discount. 
Flatware, staples, 40 and 10, fancy 40 and 5 
pel rent. 

UliSS. 
P,lauss, nickel, discount GO per cent, 
klauss, Japan, discount 674 per cent, 
"lauss, tailors, discount 40 per cent, 
eymour's, disoount 50 and 10 per cent. 
traps (steel.) 
Oame, Newhouse, discount 30 and 10 per 
Game, Hawley & Norton, 50, 10 & 5 pe" - 
Game, Victor, 70 per cent. 
Game, Oneida Jump (B. & L.) 40 & 2i< 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per cent. 



Kemp's Tornado and McClary t Model 
galvanized oil can, with pump, 5 gal- 



loiijje/ dozen 10 00 

Darn 

Zinc' and tin, discount 50 per cent 



dsori 



Oilers, discount 40 per cent 



perowL 



Skates, discount 37'/2 per cent. 

Mic Mac hockey sticks, per doz 4 CO 5 00 

New Rex hockey sticks, per doz 6 25 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 

APPLE PARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

BIRD CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 and 10 p. c. 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boilers, kettles, teapots, etc. 30 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 334 per cent. 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

London. White, Princess, Turquoise, Onyx, 

Blue and White, discount 50 per cent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Pearl, Imperial Orescent, 30 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and white, 25 per cent. 
Japanned ware, discount 50 per cent. 
Hollow ware, tinned cast, 35 per cent. off. 

KITCHEN NOVELTIES. 

Can openers, per doz 40 75 

Mincing knives per doz 50 80 

Duplex mouse traps, per doz 65 

Potato mashers, wire, per doz. . . 60 70 

wood " .. 50 60 

Vege' able slicers, per doz 2 25 

Universal meat chopper No. 0, $1; No.l. 1.15. 

Enterprise chopper, each 1 30 

LAMP WI0K8. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 1 87 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

AU glass " 50 90 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

Tin and gilt, picture wire, 75 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 92 

Common, plain 4 50 

plated B 50 

Asbestos, per set 125 



TINWARE. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2 in. plain or corrugated., per 100 feet. 
$3.30; 3 in, $440; 4in.,S5.80; 5 in., $7.45; 
6 in., S9.9J. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROCOHS. 

10-inob per 100 ft. 3 30 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per oent. 
Milk can trimmings, discount 25 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

No. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast .... per doz. 6 50 
Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, " 4 75 
Better quality at higher prices. 
Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 



Coppered oilers, 20 per cent. off. 
Brass oilers, 50 per cent, off. 
Malleable, discouut 25 per cent 

PAILS (GALVANIZED). 

Dufferin pattern pails, 40. 10 and 5 per cent. 
Flaring pattern, discount 40, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs 40. 10 and 5 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. daring sap buckets, discount 40 per ceLt. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 35 p.c. 
Creamery cans, discount 40 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, 75 and 124 per oent. off revised list. 
Retimed, 72J 10 and 5 per oent. revised list. 
SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks 8 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 



STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch " 1 48 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent. 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per cent. 



WIRE. 

BRIGHT WIRE. 

Discount 62} per oent. 

CLOTHES LINE WIRE. 

7 wire solid line, No. 17, $4.90; No. 
18, $3.00 ; No. 19, §2.70 ; fi wire solid line, 
No. 17, $4.45 ; No. 18, $2.80. No. 19, $2.50. 
All prices per 1000 ft. measure. F.o.b. Ham 11- 
ton Toronto, Montreal. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9, 82 55, No. 11. $3.20; 
No. 1?, $2.80. 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE. 

Discount 45 per cent. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 30 per cent. List of extras: 
In 100-lb. lots : No. 17, $5 - No. 18, 
$5.50 - No. 19, $6 - No. 20, $6.65 - No. 21, 
$71 -No. 22, $7.30 - No 23, $7,65 -No. 
24, $8 — No. 25, $9— No. 26, $9.50— No. 27, 
$10— No. 28, $11— No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13- 
No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
75c. — oiling, 10c — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c. — in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c.— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in 1-lb. banks, 38o.— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or oases, 15c.— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 



GALVANIZED WTRE. 

Per 100 lb.- Nos. 4 and 5, $3.70 - 
Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 - No. 9. $2.50 - 
No. 10, $3.20 - No. 11, $3.25-No. 12, $2.65 
—No. 13, $2.75— No. 14. $3.75— No. 15, $4.30 
—No. 16. $4.30 from stock. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2.35 f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlnts 
121c. less. 

LIGHT STRAIGHTENED WIRE. 

Over 20 in. 

Gauge No. per 100 lbs. 10 to 20 in. 5 to 10 in. 

to 5 $0.50 $0.75 $1.25 

6 to 9 0.75 1.25 2 00 

10 to 11 1.00 1.75 2.50 

12 to 14 1.50 2.25 3.50 

15 to 16 2.00 3.00 4.50 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.25; No. 10 gauge, 6c- 
extra ; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra ; No. 12 
gauge, 20c. extra ; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra!; 
No 14 gauge. 40c. extra ; No. 15 gauge. 65c. 
extra ; No. 16 gauge, 7 c. extra. Add 60c. 
for coppering and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. —Oiled wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, in J-lb. hanks 75c, in J-lb. 
hanks $1. 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2 in mesh 19 w. g., discount 50 and 10 per 
cent. All others 50 per oent. 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls, $1.62%, per 
100 sq. ft.; in 50-ft. rolls, $1.67% per 100 s<i ft. 
Terms, 2 per oent. off 30 days. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 95 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 30 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.70 for 
small lots and $2. CO .for oarlot . 



WOODEN WIRE. 

CHURNS. 

No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, 
$11 ; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 30 and 30 
per cent.; f.p.b. Ottawa, Kingston and 
Montreal, 40 and 15 per cent, discount, 
Taylor-Forbes, 30 and 30 per cent. 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis. 40 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders,dis.40 per cent- 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

"Best "mops 125 

"900 "mops 125 

Folding ironing boards 12 03 16 50 

REFRIGERATOR8 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 7 25 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grained 
only, 4-in., style per doz. 7 55 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, light stair 
pei doz 9 55 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 60 00 

Square " ' 63 00 

Eclipse, per doz 54 00 

Dowswell " 39 00 

New Century, per doz 75 00 

Daisy 54 00 

WRINGERS. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., per doz. ... 34 00 

Royal American. 11 in. . . ?4 CO 

Eze, 10 in., per dor. 3# 75 

Terms, 2 per cent., 30 days. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, GjM^^IVPcent. 

No. 1, not widei^ura in., TO, 10 and 10 p .• 
Agricujtural, lM^Hfer than 4 in., 75 per cent 
|her, pei-We, 75c; cut laces, 80c. 

BOOT OAI.KS. 

SmaTTKd medium, ball per M 4 25 

Small nee) " 4 50 

OARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Bullard 's " 6 50 

CASTORS. 
Bed, new list, discount 55 to 571 per cent. 
Plate, discount 52} to 571 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

1 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

" " .... 9 60 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 22 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 40 2 00 

Canadian pitcher spout, .... 1 80 3 16 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal 10} 

Pure Manilla 151 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

1 inch 25 28 

Russia Deep Sea 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Tarn, single 10 

double 101 

Sisal bed cord. 48 feet per doz. 65 

•' " 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 



Twine. 



Bag, Russian twine, per lb 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 

•' " 4 ply _ 

Mattress twine per lb S3 45 

Staging " " 27 35 



27 
25 

» 



Gumey Standard, 40 per cent. 
Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 
Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 

Weigh Beams, discount 40 per cent. 

Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

" Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren new Standard, discount 40 per cent. 

" " Champion, discount 50 per cent. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

STONES— on UTS -cythe. 

Washita per lb. 25 9 37 

HindosUn " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek " 10 

Deerlick " 25 

Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " 42 

Arkansas " .... 150 

Water-of-Ayr ' 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton 20 00 22 00 

" under40 1b., ' 24 00 

" 200 lb. and over 28 00 



65 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



KEARNEY & FOOT 



The 

Best 

Rasp 

Made 




The 
Rasp 
that 
sel/s 



MADE BY 



Nicholson File Co., 



Dominion 
Wks. 



Port Hope, Ont. 



Wrought Iron Pipo and Cast Iron Fittings 

Our Stock in these lines is complete, fjjk 
Can fill all orders promptly. Be sup- 
plied before the Pall rush commences. 



WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



A 

Acme Can Works 11 

Alabastine Co 52 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co 14 

Armstrong Mfg. Co 58 

Atkins, E. 0., a Co 53 

AtlasMfg.Oo 45 

B 

Ban well Hoxit Wire Fence Co 17 

Harnett. U & H. Co outside back cover 

Batty Stove Co 41 

Belleville Ro ling Mills 17 

Berry Bros 51 

Birkett, Trios. a Son Co 1 

Brandram Henderson 48 

Brantford Cordago Do 20 

Brantford Rooting Co 9 

Burr Mfg. Co 12 

Business Systems 19 

c 

Cameron a Campbell 20 

Canada Foundry Co 12 

Canada Horse Nail Co 18 

Canada lion Furnace Co 41 

Canada Metal Co 14 

Canada Paint Co 51 

Canada Paner Co 12 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works 47 

Canadian Fairbanks Co 58, 60 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co. . 18 

Canadian Oil Co 52 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 41 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co 7 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 1 

ClauM Shear Co 63 

dull Bros 59 

Consolidated Plate Class Co 42 

Consumers' Cordage Co 10 

Copp, W. J 37 

CovertMfg.Co 14 

D 

Dana Mfg Co 16 

Davenport, Percy P 12 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 4 

Dennis Iron and Wire Co 16 

Dieckmann, Ferdinand 43 

Dominion Cartridge Co 17 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co 4 

Dorken Bros ouuide front cover 



Dowswell Mfg. Co 9 

Dundas Axe Works 19 

E 

Eadie, H. G 41 

Emlyn Saw Bench 14 

English Embrocation Co 72 

Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Akron, Ohio 

inside back cover 
Erie Specialty Co inside back cover 

F 

Forman, John f0 

Forwell Foundry Co 58 

Fox, C. H 42 

Frothingham a Workman 6 

Q 

Gait Art Metal Co 45 

Gibb, Alexander 42 

Gibsone. J. B 13 

Gilbertson, W., * Co 41 

Glauber Brass Co 58 

Grautoff, B. A 10 

Greening, B., Wire Co.... 72 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

ouuide back cover 

H 

Hamilton Cotton Co 16 

Hanover Portland Cement Co 12 

Harrington a Richardson Arms Co ... . 21 

Harris.J. W., Co 11 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 14 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 53 

Howland, H. 8., Sons a Co 5 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 17 

Hyde. F. A Co 13 

I 

Imperial Vamish and Color Co 46 

International Gas Appliance Co 5!i 

International Portland Cement Co. . . . 12 

J 

Jamieson, R. C, 4 Co 47 

Jardine, A. B., a Co 41 

Johnson's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 44 

Joy Mfg. Co 18 

K 

Kemp Mfg. Co 2) 

Kerr Engine Co 60 



L 

Lamplough, F. W. & Co 14 

Leslie, A. C, a Co. outside front cover, 41 

Lewis Bros. , Limited . . . 3 

Lewis, Rice, & Son inside front cover 

Lockerby a McComb 53 

London Foundry Co 60 

Lucas, John 49 

Ludger Gravel Co 42 

Lufkin Rule Co inside back cover 

Mo 

McArthur. Alex.. a Co 85 

MoOaskill, Dougall & Co 47 

MoDougall, R., Co 61 

M 

Maofarlane, Walter 68 

Maxwell. David 68 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 45 

Metallio Roofing Co 39 

Millen. John & Son ....outside back cover 

Mitchell, H.W 42 

Moore. Benjamin, a Co 51 

Morrison, James. Brass Mfg. Co 54 

Morrow, John, M teniae Screw Co . . . 14 

Mueller, H, Mfg. Oo ... 61 

Munderloh a Co 65 

N 

Newman, W., a Song 13 

Nicholson File Co 66 

NorthBros. Mfg. Oo 7 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 41 

o 

Oakey, John, a Sons 41 

Ontario Steel Ware Co 15 

Ontario Tack Co 41 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Oo . . 13 

Orford Copper Co , 41 

Oshawa Steam a Gas Ftting Co 58 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 11 

P 

Paterson Mfg. Oo 64 

Pelton, Godfrey S 47 

Penberthy Injector Oo ... 61 

Peterborough Look Oo 9 

Peterborough Shovel a Tool Oo 16 

66 



Phillips, Ohas. D 75 

Phillips, Geo., a Oo 53 

Pink, Thos 2 



Queen City Oil Co 45 



Ramsay, A., a Son Co 49 

Reid, David 37 

Robertson. James Co inside back cover 

Roper, J. H 17 

Round, John, a Son 10 



s 



Salyerds, E. B 11 

sauiuel, M. a L., Benjamin, a Oo 2 

Scott, Bathgate a Oo 42 

Sells Commercial... 15 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 14 

Stiantz, I. E., a Oo 58 

Sharratt a Newth 58 

Bbirrefl Mfg. Co 13 

rtherwin- Williams Co 40 

Shurley a Deitrich 8 

Silica Barytic Stone Oo 14 

Stairs, Son a Morrow 66 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co 54 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works. .. 47 

Stanley Rule a Level Co 47 

Steel Trough and Machine Co 17 

Stephens, G. F.,a Oo 36 

Sterne, G. F., a Son 58 

si, 11, J. N., &Co H 



Taylor-Forbes Oo outside front cover 

Thompson, B. aS.H.Oo. outside back cover 
Toronto and Belleville Rolling Mills. . . i3 
Turner Brass Works 60 



Vickery.O. 



w 

Wuriiiinton, J. N 16 

Western Assurance Co 22 

Western Wire Nail Co 9 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Oo 3/ 

Wright. E. T, a Oo 12 



HARDWARE AND M 



A l«- 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Auditors. 

Davenport, Percy P., Winnipeg, 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Robertson, Jas. Co,, Montreal. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Carriage Mounting Co., Toronto. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Peroha aud Rubber Mfg. Co. 
Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson s. Iver, Arms aud Cycle Works 
Fitchburg, Mass 

Binder Twine. 
Consumers Cordage Co. , Montreal. 

Boa- Strap. 

J. N. Waroiinion, Montreal. 

Brass Goods. 

Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, .las., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Mueller Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Bronze Powders. 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works, Mon- 
treal. 

Brushes. 

Ramsay, A., 4 Son Co., Montreal. 

Can Openers. 

dimming Mfg. Co. Renfrew. 

Cans, 

Acme Can Works, Montreal. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Frothingham 4 Workman Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby 4 McComb, Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Newman 4 Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule 4 Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Carriage Accessories. 

Carriage Mountings Co., Toronto. 
Covert Mtg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H. 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co. , Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Speoialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Clutch Nails. 

J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Cut Glass. 

Phillips, Geo., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Son Co., Ottawa. 
Clause Shear Co., Toronto 
Dorken Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sonn Co., Newark, N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Phillips, Geo.. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, 4 Son, Montreal. 

Dooi Hangers. 

Door Hanger Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian General Electric Co.. Toronto. 
Forman, John, Montreal. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 
Munderloh 4 Co., Montreal. 

Electro Cabinets. 

Cameron 4 Campbell Toronto. 

Engines, Supplies, etc. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 



Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co.. G. 4 H . Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope 

Financial Institutions 

Bradstreet Co. 
Firearms and Ammunition. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's, Iver, Arms aud Cycle Works, 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Food Choppers. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Galvanizing. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine 4 Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Gibsone, J. B., Montreal. 
Pelton, Godfrey S. 
Sharratt 4 Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., 4 Son, London, Eng. 

Hack Saws. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Harvest Tools. 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co , Tillson- 
burg Ont. 

Hoop Iron. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co , Montreal. 
J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Horse Blankets. 

Heney, E. N., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers and Radi- 
ators. 

Cluff, R. J., & Co., Toronto. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., & Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, ThoB., 4 Son Co., Ottawa. 
Maxwell, D., & Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Taylor, Forbes Co. , Guelph. 

Lawn Swings, Settees, Chairs. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Renfrew. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Business Systems, T ronto. 
Copeland-Chatterson Co , Toronto. 
Crain, Rolla L., Co.. Ottawa. 
Universal Systems, Toronto. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., 4 Co., Pembroke Ont. 

Mantels, Grates and Tiles, 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Fox, 0. H., Vancouver. » 

Gibb, Alexander. Montreal. 

Mitchell Divid O, 4 Co., Glasgow, Scot. 

Mitchell, H. W., Winnipeg. 

Pearce, Frank, 4 Co. Liverpool, Eng. 

Scat, Bathgate 4 Co., Winnipeg. 

Thome, R, E., Montreal and Joronto. 



Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 

Kadie, II (!., Montreal. 

Gibb, Aleiander, Montreal. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Leslie, A. C, 4 Co., Montreal. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Kng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Robertson, Jas., Co.. Monl real 
Roper, J. H, Montreal 
Samuel, Benjamin 4 Co., Toronto. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N s. 
Thompson. B. 4 S. H. 4 Co. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, 
Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons, London, Eng. 

Mops. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Refrew. 

Mouse Traps. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Renfrew. 

Oil Tanks. 

Bowser, S. F., 4 Co., Toronto. 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass. 

Bell, Thos., Sons 4 Co , Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co. , Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co.. Toronto 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Fenner, Fred., 4 Co., London, Eng. 
Henderson 4 Potts Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. O, 4 Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Corneille 4 Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall 4 Co.. Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Moore, Benjamin, 4 Co. Toronto. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay 4 Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens 4 Co., Winnipeg. 
Martin-Senour Co., Chicago. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Borden Co,, Warren, Ohio. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Cluff, R. J., 4 Co., Toronto. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jardine, A. B., 4 Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., Boston, Mass. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 
Merrell Mfg. Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Mi ntreal Rolling Mids Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Mueller, H., Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Fitting Oo.,Oshawa 
Robertson Jas., Co. Montreal 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
Standard Sanitary Co., Pittsburg. 
Stephens, G F., 4 Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Turner Brass Works, Chicago. 
Vickery, Orlando, Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Grey 4 Bruce Portland Cement Co.- 
Owen Sound. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 

Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal. 

Potato Mashers. 

Cumming Mfg Co., Renfrew. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Razors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Brantford Rooting Co.. Brantford. 
McArthur, Alex., & Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallio Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto 4 Montreal. 

Saws. 

Atkins, E.G., 4 Co., Indianapolis, Ind 
Lewis Bros., Montreal. 
Shurly 4 Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 
Spear 4 Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 

Saws — Hack. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buff alo 

67 



Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

Screw Cabinets, 

Cameron 4 Campbell. Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, links. 

tfontreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw On., 
Ii ..'Moll, Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe (3o., Hamiltor 
Hyde, F., 4 Co.. Montreal. 

Shelf Boxes. 

Cameron 4 Campbell, Toronto 

Shears, Scissors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Shellac 

Bell, Thos., Sons 4 Co., Montreal. 

Shovels and Spades. 

Canadian Shovel Co. Hamilton. 
Peterboro Shovel 4 Tool Co , Peterboro. 

Silverware. 

Phillips, Geo., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, 4 Son, Sheffield, Eng. 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel 4 Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stoves, Tinware, Furnaces 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Canada Stove Works, Harriston, Ont. 
Clare Bros. 4 Co., Preston. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Guelph Stove Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Joy Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co., Hamilton. 

Tacks. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 

Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Pearson, Geo. D., Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wheelbarrows 

London Foundry Co., Lindon, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill, Learmont 4 Co., Montreal 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 
Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms. 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Wire Springs. 

Guelph Spring Axle Co., Guelph, On j 
Wallace-Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

Canada Fence Co., London. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal 
Greening, B.. Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire 4 Nail Co., London, Ont 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont 



Wrapping Papers. 



Canada Papor Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Alez., 4 Co , Montreal. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 





AND METAL 



FAVORITE 



CHURN 



More sold in the Dominion 
than all others oombined 



burning from 3g to 3*> gallons. 
IMPROVED STEEL FRAME. PATENT FOOT and LEVER DRIVE. 

PATENT STEEL ROLLER BEARINGS 
I .iv\ to operate. Holts throughout in p'ace of wood 
s> i .-u * Superior in « orktaanship and finish. No other 
just as good. Accept no substitute. If not offered by 
your ioliber write direct to us. 



MAXWELL 
LAWN 
MOWER 




Made In 4 different heights of wheel and widths. 

ranging from 8 to 25-m. in plain or ballbearings as 
required. Improved for coming season. Not equalled 
anywhere for clean cutting, durability and finish. 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARY'S, ONT. 




Sanitary Engineers « Sarrcem reuwpsw 



CASTINGS SuPrULD CuT J fiTTtA To flCASUHCrlFJ'iTS 
DRAtN plans worked out Ton ARCHITECTS 
CV.TALUCUtS AND PRICES ON APPLICATION 



i.^3 .^JQL o 



Glasgow 



AGENTS 
W. PORTEOUS JACK, 1256 Robson, Vancouver 
GEO. PEATT & CO., P.O. Box 466, Winnipeg, Man. 
BAXTER, PATERSON & CO., 102 St. Antoine St., Montreal. 




99 



Trade Mark 



LION 



BRAND 

PUTZ TRIPLE EXTRACT 

METAL POLISH 

LIQUID and PASTE 

For polishing all kinds of metals " Lion " 
Brand Putz Triple Extract Metal Polish 
has no equal. Gives a lasting lustre. Put 
up in liquid and past: form. Has a ready 
sale. If not in stock send a postal for ex- 
ceptional terms. Something that will give 
you handsome profits. 

English Embrocation Co., 

Montreal, Quebec 




All Kinds and Sizes and for All Purposes. 

Standard and Lang's 
Patent Lay. 



Prices Right 



Prompt Shipments 



Rope Fittings 
Rope Grease 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



G8 



HARDWARE AND M 



FOR A CHEAP SAW MILLS 
AND GENERAL FACTORY 

BABBITT 

THERE IS 
NOTHING TO BEAT 

Fleur de Lis 

ANTI-FRICTION METAL 



^P'™^^ 




LIS 

ICTION 

METAI. 



PRICE ISc. PER LB. 

Equal to imported sold at 25 cents. 
Try it and save money. 

The JaS. Robertson CO., Limited 

MONTREAL 




- «%, 



PFLUEGERS 
Fishing TacKle 




Hoohs, Flies, 
Trolls, Spin- 
ners, Phan- 
toms, Reels, 
Furn ished 
Lines. 

Everything 
in Fishing 
TacKle. 



NOTICE— Free to Any Dealer in Sporting Goods, 
Sent Express Prepaid, 170-Page Illustrated Cata- 
logue No. F25, and Metal Fish Sign in 8-Color 
Lithograph. 

The Enterprise Mfg. Co. 

AKRON, Ohio, U.S.A. 




f UFKfN MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Ete, 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

London Offloe and Warehou*»-24 tnd 26 Holborn. N«w York City Branch e*0 Bro*4i 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



— ^ — - "**■ 




Inc. ISM. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ~1 ^ M " Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



Copy ol cata- 
locua («nt free 
to any lnter- 
astad file aser 
opon applica- 
tion 




THE BURMAN No. 13 PATENT 

POWER 
CLIPPER 

A light and compactly built 
machine specially designed for 
portability. 

When taken to pieces it packs 
into a case 17 in. by 11 in. by 7 
in., the total weight being only 
34 lbs. 

All cogs are machine-cut from 
solid metal. 

The No. 13 is a triumph of 
efficiency at the lowest possible 
cost. 

Prices ana Catalogues with full particulars upon 
application to 

B. & S.H.THQMPSQII & Co. 

ESS L I M I T E D" ~ 

63 ST. SULPICE STREET, MONTREAL 




"Redstone" 

High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 

A packing that will hold. For use in highest 
pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured Solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

Branches i Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



SHELBY 
SEAMLESS 
STEEL TUBES 



INVALUABLE IN 



General Machine Shop Work 
Bicycle Repairs 
Hydraulic Work 
Boiler Work 

We carry the largest stock of steel tubes in the 
Dominion. We can ship promptly almost any 
size or quantity called for. 

CANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS 

JOHN MILLEN & SON, LTD. 



321 St. James St. 
MONTREAL 



132 Bay Street 
TORONTO 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN C/tflADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West * Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE»METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 
Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 12, 1907 



NO. 2. 



r ** 

^ 



0Si BO/ffi 

W MANIIFAfTIIPFP ^*J 



V. 



\&* MAMUFACTURER ^-tf 

ARROW#BRAND 



%. 



REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

HARDWARE 

f % SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



,Qr 



>V 



•ii J Far Sal* by 



Leading Wholasala Hausas. 



Quality 

and 

"Queen's Head" 

always go together. 

JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO. Ltd., MONTREAL 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers, Canadian Branch. 



"Sovereign" Hot Water Boilers 



The main reason for their unprecedented success is — 
their apparent superiority to all boilers on the market. 

Another reason is — their wonderful simplicity. 

Of course you practical men know that superiority 
means simplicity in boiler construction. 

The "Sovereign" has made good all claims we made 
for "Simplified Heating." 

You can safely recommend the "Sovereign" all the 
time. And — it will pay you to do so. 




TAYLOR-FORBES COMPANY, Limited 

Head Office and Works : GUELPH, ONT. 



TORONTO 1088 King St. West. 



MONTREAL 122 Craig St. West. 



See Classified List of Advertisements on Page 67. 



X 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FIRE SETS and FENDERS 




B ,^ C N K - BRASS 

ANDIRONS 



K? Coal Vases 





Brass ( ' 



Scuttles 



Coal Grates 





Fenders and Fire Sets 



WRITE FOR PRICES 




Coal 
Tongs 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LirilTED 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Did it ever occur to 
you the convenience 
it is in having a 



Loose Leaf Stock-Taking 
Sheet ? 

By their use it will facilitate the taking of your Inven- 
tory, lessen the possibility of making mistakes, and allow 
any number of clerks to work at one time. Each class of 
goods can be kept on separate sheets, then the whole can 
be assembled together in one of our Binders and kept in 
convenient form. 

Before you think of taking stock write us for sample 
sheets and further information. 



The Rolla L Crain Co., Limited 

OTTAWA, CANADA 

TORONTO : MONTREAL : 

18 Toronto Street Alliance Bldg., 107 St. James St. 

WINNIPEC : 11 Nanton Block 



OUR LINES 

FOR XMAS 

ARE SELLERS 

BOKER'S SKATES 

Single and Double Enders. 

Dominion Perfect, Rover, King Fisher, Crescent 

HOCKEY STICKS 
GILLETTE SAFETY RAZORS 

No stropping; no honing. 

GILLETTE EXTRA BLADES 

BOKER'S KING CUTTER RAZORS 

RODGER'S PEN AND POCKET KNIVES 

CARVERS IN CASES 

SCISSORS IN CASES 

QUALITY HIGH PRICES LOW 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

Wholesale Hardware 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITED 



Other Tools are very ■' 
Good Tools, but 

SCREW DRIVERS 



YANKEE TOOLS" 




ARE 

JETTER 
The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLINQ TOOLS 



of the KIND. 
DRILLS 



No. 10 * II — RATCHET, right and left band and rigid. 





Mo. IS— RATCHET, with finger turn on blade. 

/kkee- "r- 

ii 



No. 40— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with Ratchet Movement. 




No. 30— SPIRAL RATCHET -right and left hand and rigid. 
No. SI— " " (heavy pattern) 

No. 20— " " right hand only. 



Chuck and 8 Drill Points 

for ipiral ratchet 
•crew driver. 



Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 
•crew driver. 





No. 12-RATCHET, 

with stuo blade 




i.i ; iJ!i.u.M<ifJH-ii.;;in.i«j.«iCT: 
No. 43— AUTOMATIC DRILL, for light drills only 





No. 60 POCKET 
J SCREW DRIVER. 



No. 44— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 





No SO— RECIPROCATING DRILL, for wood or meUli. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW ''YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO 



HILAD 



IA, F> 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Pjrvlf 1 C MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pinks Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pinks Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rock Maple. 

These are light and durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 

MANUFACTURED BY 

SKSST THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Ont, Canada. 



Established 1855 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

PIG IRON 

ENGLISH and SCOTCH 



Prompt and forward delivery. 



Interesting prices. 



Warehouse: 54-56-58 Front St. West and 1 Piper St. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Go 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

: GET OUT AND 

I HUSTLE 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 




If you'll take a half day off and go around town, you'll find hundreds of 
doors without checks, springs or any kind of an arrangement for keeping them 
shut. 

Get after the people who own these doors, explain the advantages of having 
a Liquid Door Check on them, and you'll get a surprise at the number of 
orders you'll get; then go back to your store and write us for prices and full 
information about SARCENT'S LIQUID DOOR CHECK— the best door check on the 
market, embodying all the good points of others, with many more which the 
others lack. 

Sargent Liquid Door Check 
and Spring 

SUCCESSFULLY PREVENTS DOORS FROM SLAMMING 

Sargent's Liquid Door Check and Spring is suitable for either right or left 
hand doors. 

The Spring is adjustable tension, very compact and powerful, and is made 
from extra heavy clock-spring steel of the finest quality. 

The Check is put up regularly for attaching to the door, but special 
brackets for attaching in different positions to the soffit and door frame and 
for any kind of door, can be furnished. 

The Check can be instantly varied for light or heavy draft by screwing the 
regulating thumb screw. 

For applying, use the directions packed with each check, and follow them 
carefully. 

Have the cylinder indoors where possible. 

Made of cast iron, gold bronze finish. 

No. 121. Gold bronze, for light inside doors. 

No. 123. " " for medium size inside doors. 

No. 125. " " for heavy inside or light outside doors. 

No. 127. " " for medium size outside doors. 

No. 129. " " for heavy outside doors. 



LEWIS BROS., ltd 



OTTAWA 
TORONTO 



MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 
CALGARY 




Showing the Check and Spring 
Applied with Corner Bracket 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



♦ 




Showing the Check and Spring 
Applied with Flush Bracket 




♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Dame Quality at 
Our Bidding Waits 



Our HCMClSClWS are made of "top-notch" Crucible Cast Steel, they 
are tempered in oil and carefully tested. Every one is guaranteed. 

The illustration shows one of our Patent Ground, Hollow-Back, Highly-Tempered, 
Highly-Finished Handsaws. It is praised the world over. 

We also make Back Saws, Circular Saws, Hack Saws, Mill Saws, Canada Webs, 
Files. Edge Tools, etc. 

The sun never sets on Spear & Jackson's Wares 

A POSTCARD SENT TO US MAY MEAN A PILE 
OF BUSINESS SENT TO YOU. 

SPEAR & IACKS0N SSU Sheffield, England 

^^ ■ ^*»« » W* J m M Vrf> W m%^ %^ ■ M " w,,,l » Telegraphic Address:'! Spear," Sheffield 



We desire to extend our hearty greetings to 
all our customers and friends and hope they, 
one and all, will enjoy a very Happy and Prosper- 
ous New Year. We would also take this oppor- 
tunity to thank them for their kind consideration 
in the past and assure them that their interests 
in the future will be more closely looked after 
than ever. 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. Ltd., 



MONTREAL and 
WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS &. CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 

138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




"Boss" 
Boring Machine 



raming Tools 




Socket Firmer Chisel— I'l.iln Back. 




Socket Firmer Chisel Bevel Kdge. 




Socket Framing Chisel 



Socket Corner Chisel 




Socket Carpenter's Slick 





"Miller Falls" 
Boring Machine 




Boring Machine 



Angular Boring Machine 



Boring Machine Augur 



For fuller particulars see our Catalogue 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



We Ship promptly 



Opposite Union Station. 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Factory : Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont. 
5 



Our Prices are Right 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A Promise 



of good service is made by many an axe 
with its brightly polished edge, gilt 
head and brilliant label. But the dis- 
appointments are altogether too fre- 
quent. When selecting axes for your 
stock why not choose those which have 
been known for years for their reliability. 




Dunn's " Clipper " Axe is an 

axe we have sold for 20 years 
and have always found it reliable 
and it is still reliable. No 
better recommendation for an 
axe is wanted than such a record. 



The " Bedford Ebony " is 

another axe found for many 
years on our sales records. It 
is hand-made by expert axe 
makers and has the natural 



forge finish. 

Stock weights of these axes are 3 to 3^, 3X to 3^, 3 

$ l /2 to 4^-lh. 



to 4 



feK 



2^X \&X>i> 




We have Axe Handles 
Axe Stones 
Axe Wedges 

in large variety we ship 

them promptly. Write us when in a 

hurry. 




F.^W. 



Hardware 
Montreal 




FROTH1NGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited, MONTREAL, CANADA. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALS 



BAR IRON and STEEL 
BLACK SHEET IRON, TINNED SHEETS 

GALVANIZED IRON 

CANADA PLATES, TERNE PLATES 

SHEET TIN, INGOT TIN 

PIG LEAD 

SHEET ZINC, ZINC SPELTER 

IRON PIPE, VALVES and FITTINGS 

PULLEY BLOCKS and ROPE 

CHAIN 
ANVILS and VISES 
LUMBERING TOOLS 



MONTREAL and NAZI IM fSI I REG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 







No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted, Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




b w ES * 

DIETRICH 
COINED PATE NTJ1 

SHlM£?$T&icH 

> RAZOR STEEL 

tlOO FORONECUT. 

SOO DAYS\M0RK 4 

1,000 <: no r WEEKS. ' A 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret process. 



■A) $ , 






■ - 



No. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
tln j Maple Leaf Saws. 



Manufactured 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



GALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Brantford— Roofings 



This Represents Our 




"ASPHALT" 
No. I, 2, 3 

"RUBBER" 
No. I, 2, 3 

Each Roll Is complete with Nails 
ana Cement to lay. Best selling 
goods in the market. 

BRANTFORD ROOFING CO. 

LIMITKI) 
BRANTFORD. ONTARIO 



SOStt W^\N* 




SIMPLE 




TI1E 



LEADER 



*3 



A Name Familiar to Butter Makers in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



ITS STR9NG POINfS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
LevLrand Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



TYLE F. 



W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK rtSct V"''"' 9 W00P " PIC 



KET ON Willi 




WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. LtmlUd, 



■LONDON, ONT 



fRlEST'SCLlPPERS, 

,5|^*i*"^OZ ToU^Han*. Eieotrle Porol 

' </ '/ARE THE BEST. 

High wt Quality Qroomlng and 
SbMp-Shurlog Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

■KTD FOB CATALOGUE TO 
ia«rUu lk*ir*r Mfx . C*., Sufcu, I.H..CIA 




y 



Weibusoh k Hilger, limited special New York 
repres.ntatirea, 9-15 Murray Street. 



The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 



Manufacturers of all kinds 

Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Leading Jobber* 
In the Dominion. 





Oyllnd.r Night Latch, No. 103. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Serviceable 



Combination ™ TABUE 
Cabinet 



FOR 

HARDWARE 

TRADE 



A COMBINATION THAT 
EVERYBODY MUST HAVE 



Price Complete 

LI! 

SILVER PLATED $22.30 

LIST 

$14.00 



LIST 



BEST 

NICKEL SILVER 



CONTE NTS 

6 Table Knives 
6 Dessert Knives 
6 Table Forks 
3 Table Spoons 
6 Dessert Forks 
6 Dessert Spoons 
6 Tea Spoons 
2 Salt Spoons 
1 Mustard Spoon 

42 Pieces 

JOHN ROUND & SON, yniEP 

MANUFACTURING 

Cutlers and Silversmiths 

Factories MONTREAL Established 

SHEFFIELD, Eng. 1847 




Size of Case 16' 4 -in. x 14' ..-in. x 2 \-in, 



►►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦ 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAGE 



PACKING 



LATHYARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jutk 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Rope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, L)eep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: nONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F. H. ANDREW8 & 80N, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO.. Limited, 8t. John, N.B. MacQOWAN & CO., Vancouver. 

TEE8 & PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. GEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



Increase Your Business 

with the Lumbermen, by carrying in stock 
the goods they demand. We make a full 
line of 

Pike Poles, Cant Hook 
and Peavy Handles 

which for Quality and Finish cannot be 
beaten. 

We also make a full line of AXE HANDLES. 
You can increase your trade in these by 
carrying our Handles in stock. 

Do not DELAY, but order NOW. 



J. H. Still Manufacturing Company, 

ST. THOMAS, OHTARIO 



Limited 



The Tank that Saves 



The loss of from 1 5°/ 
to 50°/ o , which experts 
say is customary when 
oil is stored in faulty 
barrels and cans, is en- 
tirely stopped by the 
Bowser. 

A Bowser Oil Storage 
Outfit prevents evapor- 
ation, leakage, waste, 
spilling and dripping and 
provides a safe, clean, 
economical, convenient 
and altogether satisfac- 
tory method of storing 
oil. 

If you want a clean 
store, a safe store, and 
bigger profits on your oil 
business, write for cata- 
log V. It tells how. 




Cut 15 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., Inc. 



66-68 Fraser Ave. 



Toronto, Ont. 




: It Saves Lives : 



A Building Necessity 

These are the names that have 
been made synonymous with the 

AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

We are the manufacturers of it and 
control the patents. 

We have placed it on some of the 
finest buildings in the Dominion. 

It is a scientific fact that no modern 
buildings can afford to neglect sani- 
tation. 

We are contractors and sanitary ex- 
perts. Our ventilator is guaranteed 
and is placed in position to suit the 
building as to quality and size. 
One Testimony : 

Montreal. June 12th, 1803. 
Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 
Messrs. J. \V. Harris Co., Limited, 

7 St. Elizabeth St.. Montreal, Que. 
Gentlemen, — Answering yours of June 1st, lam 
not personally familiar with the merits of the 
"Aeolian" Ventilators hut our Assistant Engi- 
neer, Mr. F. Crossley, reports that the Ventilators 
of thistype manufactured by you and used by this 
Company at the Place Viger Hotel, Chateau l'ron- 
tenac, Windsor Street Station and elsewhere, have 
proved satisfactory. Yours truly, 

E II. McIIf.nrv, Chief Engineer. 

The J. W. HARRIS CO., Limited 

Successors to LESSARD & HARRIS 

General Contractors and manufacturers 

MONTREAL 




ii 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Four Reasons why INVICTUS FIBRE is the BEST FIBRE PAPER on the Market 

1. lnvictus Kihrc is made from personally selected pulp wood cut on our own limits. 

2. This special pulp wood Is again rigidly culled on arrival at our mills 

3. The pulp from which lnvictus Fibre is made is manufactured in.our own pulp mill and transferred 

it once to the paper mill, avoiding all drawbacks of transportation. 

4. lnvictus Fibre will increase in strength and not grow hard and brittle as does fibre made from sul- 
phite pulp. This is a quality of the peculiar and selected pulp from which lnvictus Fibre is made, 
a dial order ■III comlnct you that we an correct. See that each package bears the words "lnvictus Fibre." Every ream 

contains 480 sheets 
This design a guarantee of quality. 

CANADA PAPER CO., LIMITED, 
"Headquarters for high grade Fibre and Manilla Papers" 

Toronto. Montreal. Windsor Mills, P.Q. 




Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 

the load yourself with 

The Burr Self-Locking 

Tackle Block Saves the labor of two or three 

GOO to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Burr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 




Cap Screws, Set Screws, 
Machine Screws, Cold Pressed 
Nuts, Studs, Coupling Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS, TORONTO. ONT. 

District Offices : Montreal, Halifax. Ottawa, Winnipeg, 
Vancouver, Rossland 




Sorting the Scrap 



ae care 



fiilh 



Not all scrap makes good bar iron — it must bi 
selected to give satisfactory results. 

London Bar Iron is made only from the choicest scrap, 
selected by experts. Consumers are unanimous that it has the 
quality. 



«L 



Orders promptly h" 

London Rolling Mills 
London, Canada. 



S2 




DISH PANS 




Made in 10, 14, 17 and 21 qt., Plain and Re-tinned 
We also manufacture all kinds of 

Stamped and Pieced Tinware 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., - HAMILTON, CAN. 



The Bowmanville Foundry Co., Limited 

Bowmanvlllo, Ont 




Makers of Good Goods Only. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Investigation and auditing of all 
classes of accounts undertaken. 
Trading, profit and loss accounts 
and balance sheets prepared. Sets 
of books opened and office systems 
devised in an up-to-date manner. 
Collection of accounts a specialty. 

PERCY P. DAVENPORT 



622 Mclntyre Block, 



WINNIPEC, MAN. 



Square your accounts 

INTERNATIONAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY, Limited 

OTTAWA, - - ONTARIO. 

Manufacturers ot strictly high-grade Portland Cement 
made by the most improved method ot manufacture in 
existence. Each barrel contains three hundred and fifty 
pounds ot pure Portland Cement with no adulteration. 

The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

Manufacturer! of the celebrated 

'Saugoon Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Frlcei on application. Prompt shipment 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Let us ' 
Help You 
Increase 
YourBusiness 

Why not go after 

and get the fire brick 
trade in your locality. 

Our expert informa- 
tion is at your com- 
mand and will enable 
you to make this a pay- 
ing line. 

Make this one of the 
New Year resolutions 
and KEEP IT. 



Francis Hyde & Co. 

Contractors 

and 

Foundry Supplies 

31 WELLINGTON ST. 
MONTREAL 



The Progressive Dealer 

is careful when he makes up his order 
list —especially careful when it comes 
to Food Choppers. 

THE "GENERAL" FOOD CHOPPER 



does more to rivet a customer to 
your store than any other article 
you can place on your order list. 

All parts of this machine are 
tinned and interchangeable. 



This is a guaranteed Canadian 
article, and If you'd mail us a 
post card we'd send ycu some 
interesting facts. 




SHIR.REFF MANUFACTURING CO. 

BROCttVILLE, ONT. 



It will pay you 

We give herewith the experience of one of our subscribers. 

There is no reason why you cannot obtain just as good 
results. 

THE PEOPLES HARDWARE STORE. 

HARDWARE AND METAL Essex, Jan. 27, 1906 

Toronto, Ont. 
Dear Sirs — Within one month I have " bought and sold" with the 
best of satisfaction — the result of $1.68 worth of condensed ads. in HARD- 
WARE AND METAL. 

In the future when I want to knoiv anything in the hardware business 
I will seek your paper. 

Yours truly, IVESON L. COOKE. 

Remember your ad. will be read by Hardware Dealers in 
all parts of Canada. 

2 cents per word for first Insertion 

I cemt " " subsequent insertions 

Send cash with advertisement, 5c. additional for Box number 
HARDWARE AND METAL 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO 



WINNIPE C 



OUR LINES ARE SELLERS ! 

Why Not Write for Particulars? 

CABLE ADDRESS "SUPERIOR" FARLEY WORKS, SHEFFIELD, ENG 

GEORGE PHILLIPS & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Silverware, Electroplate and Cutlery 

We also make the best Razor on the market. Four exclusive brands with advertised names that will help 
every dealer. It costs a two cent stamp to find out about these solid old country lines which you cannot 
duplicate elsewhere. ALL MONEYMAKERS. 

OFFICE FOR CANADA, PACKARD BUILDING, MONTREAL 



TELEPHONE M 557 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




„ «».-*** *"!_ v 

"&£ veat- ___ — ' hardware \ 

, tYnsJ c — -^ rj^e ^^dsotnel 

each pERSONj^^SSt **M 



We are breaking all records in sales of Meat and Food Choppers. 
If you are not selling more 

Enterprise Meat -Food Choppers 

than ever before there is something wrong. 

Write us for "ginger" (live advertising matter), to start business 
bubbling your way. 

People are afraid now of packing house products. 

They want to chop their own meats. 

They are buying Meat Choppers from the dealers who are pushing 
them. Get in line ! 

THE ENTERPRISE MFQ. CO. OF PA. 

PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 

NEW YORK BRANCH : 10 Warren Street. SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH : 438 Market Street 




The John Morrow Screw, Limited 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 

Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTAEIO 



CELEBRA £D 



HEiNISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

tOKROWLIDUD THI 1I»T 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. ^a v rTn°j pp, S b «-.a" Ch "■ fc • ,, * 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY UKQTJKSTIOKBD.' 

Each pair of our shears bears th- above trade mark. 




TKADM »1»K 



OomplrU Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS' 
and TAILORS' SHEARS, Etc., Exo. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Ci /many 

WIEIUSOH k HILOKR, Limited NEW YORK. S I* Ag«nt s 

14 



Latest Cat a 
loguo will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your bus' new 

card. 




Covert Mfg. Co. 

Troy, N.Y. 

Harness Snaps, Chain, 

Rope and Web Goods. 

etc. 

For sale by Jobbers at 

Manuf caturers' Prices 




280 



JTRE ET PAVINO an d SIDEWALK S ■ SPECIALTY 

SILICA BARYTIG STONtTcoT 

OF ONTARIO, Limited. 

lleait Office 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills, General Manan* 
Ask for quotations for 



WatfrProof Floors foi 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
I Cheese Factories, Cel- 
lar, Stable Floors, eto- 



Septic Tanks. 




"The Tool Holder People" 

ARMSTRONG 
BROS. TOOL CO. 

Manufacturers of Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

106 N Francisco Ave.. CHICAGO, ILL. 



mm 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DREADNOUGHT 



A HIGH-GRADE ENAMELLED WARE 




Write for Catalogue 



Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 



115-121 Brock Ave. and 79-31 



orence S"t. 



TORONTO, ONT 



A.RUDD&CO., St. Helens, Lancashire, England 

Manufacturers of highest grade 

GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 






rjs.- P-,w' 



IN ALL PATTERNS 



Made only by thoroughly experienced workmen. 10 years as glass cutter and 16 years as 
as chooser and setter being the experience of our head eetter. 

Canadian Ageut : I. B. GIBSONE. P.O. Box No. ^7&. MONTREAL 

From whom users of Glaziers' Diamonds, can obtain the names of wholesale merchants, who stock A. Rudd's goods. 



The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages ov.-r the ordinary 
spring, and has twice the wear. In use through- 
out Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives perfect 

satisfaction. Made oily by 

W. NEWMAN & SON8, 

Hospital 8t., - BIRMINGHAM 



"QUALITY UNSURPASSED.' 

BAR IRON 



av\ -w-'V' vwvvvx 



I WWV V VV VVW ** VAVX V^/V^^^V^-^/^^ ^ 



or 



rompt Shipments "try: 



TORONTO AND BELLEVILLE ROLLING MILLS, LIMITED 



VII 



ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Every Day 

you have call for something new 
in Blacksmiths' and Carriage-making Sup- 
plies. Why not stock our goods ? They 
include a rare variety of money-makers 
That's what other merchants are doing. 
Let us tell you the secret of our prices. 
Send for catalogue to-day. 

Look il our list of Agenclss. It will pay you to got acquainted. 

AGENCIES: 

Asphalt Blook Oo. 1. d., Walkerrille, On*, 

1 ilar.t I'aiut ami Varnish Works, Liuiitfil. Win.l» >. 

On! 
The Frank Miller CV . Hew York. \ V. 
Wm,i i., 1.1,1 , Wiii.lsor.Ont. 

The CooIki)- Carinas.' Co., l.ul , Toronto, Out. 
tie IV, Chatham. Out. 
Ihe Nererslip Manufacturing I'.', Ww Brunswick, N J 

H r ft Son, Ltd , Sheffield, Eug. 

Euglt*h Standard Varnish Company. 
Bonne] Viae ft Tool Works, Inc.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Walker Sieel KaDge Co., Ltd., Urimshy, Ont. 
Malinka Hume Deposit Vaults. Toledo, Ohio 
The Srarls M ark, N.J. 

Proprietor Balmoral Oil. 

LUDCER CRAVEL 

22 and 28 Jacques Cartier Square 
MONTREAL 



PHONES 

Office, Bell. Main ill. 
House, Bell, Main 611. 

Tel Merchants 964 



After 6 p.m., Est 23U. 
Quebec Office, 752. 



The advertiser talks to 
you through Hardware and 
Metal. You should talk to 
him through correspondence. 



THE 



SPECIALLY ROLLED STEEL 

used in making 

Hamilton Rifles 

gives the maximum strength with the minimum weight — 
the condition par excellence in rifle-making. 

HAMILTON RIFLES are made in three models — 
Nos. 15, 19, 23 

No. 15 sells at $2.00 
No. 19 sells at $2.50 
No. 23 sells at $3.50 

ORDER FROM THE JOBBER 



THE HAMILTON RIFLE CO. 

Dept. 71 Plymouth, Mich. 




are the most essential feature of modern hardware 
selling---you can get your shelf goods together--- 
your heavy specials together and in any order-- - 
it is what facilitates buying and gets money on the 
flow to you. 



UNIVERSAL SYSTEMS LIMITED 



8-10 ADELAIDE STREET W., 

TORONTO, ONT. 



14 DANK OF OTTAWA BLOC, 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



16 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



An Important Fact 

More good solid busi" 
nesses have been built 
on the merits of 

The 

Empire 

Queen 

Range 

than on any other 
range ever manufac- 
tured in this Canada 
of ours. Merit always 
tells and always will. 

If you've a vacant spot on your floor, The Empire Queen 

should be there. If you haven't any space, you certainly 

ought to make space for it. 

There's money in The Empire Queen for you— 

lots of it. 




The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co, 



OWEN SOUND, Ontario. 



Limited, 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO.. Limited, 238 King St., Winnipeg, Man., 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., 126 West Craig St., 
Montreal, Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



We do one thing well. 
We build steel ranges, 

Have you considered any of the many 

advantages peculiar to the 

Joy Malleable? 

Remember The Mailable Angle Frames, riveted tight 
at the front and back of the oven body. 

Think of the Mailable doors, dampers and hinges made 
' for wear and tear. 

Don't forget the roomy low warming oven, for which 
the housekeeper has a thousand uses. 

Reflect on the plain but handsome nickel trimming 
throughout; it will reflect on you. 

Contemplate the fire-box, its perpendicular sides and 
well balanced duplex grates, insuring a clean 
fire and perfect combustion. 

Meditate on the benefits of a full malleable top. 

Study the Subject. Satisfy yourself of the many points 
of superiority, and push the sale of the only 
Malleable Range made in Canada for the 
trade. 



JOY MFG. CO., 



32 tlumberside Ave. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



TEES& PERSSE CO., - Western Distributors, Winnipeg 
CHA8. H. FOX, - Agent for British Columbia, Vancouver 



"Samson" Milk Cans, Trimmings, Etc. 




'SAMSON" 



.Now is the time when you should get your 
stock of these goods into shape for spring 
business. 

If you handle the "Samson" line you know 
you have something better than your competitor. 

You know when you recommend "Samson"' 
Milk Cans and Trimmings to your customers 
that the goods will bear out your recommend- 
ations. 

We can ship the finished articles or the 
trimmings promptly. 




'SAMSON' 



THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, 
ST. JOHN, N.B., HAMILTON, CALGARY. 

'EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP" 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



OUR LATEST 
QUICK SELLER 



NO. 445 
IRONING BOARD 

The newest 
and most 
convenient. 

Insist on your jobber 

supplying you 

with No. 445. 





Simply raise the top and it can be used as a skirt board. 

WE KNOW WHAT THE HOUSEKEEPER 
WANTS AND WE MAKE THE GOODS 



CUMMING'S GOODS ARE GOOD GOODS 



Made by- 



CLOSED 



The Gumming Manufacturing Co., Limited 

Renfrew, O n "t . 
WINNIPEG : 608 Ashdown Bldg. 




Peerless Woven Wire Fence 



Here is a fence that will sell. Once up no need for repairs. 
It lasts for years— just what you are looking for. It's horse- 
high, pig-tight and bull-strong. No stock can [get over, 
under or through it. The most unruly animal can't butt it 
down and there are no barbs to tear and injure stock. It's 

WIND AND WEATHER PROOF 

The Peerless lock holds it perfectly rigid and the wires can't 
slip up, down, norsidewise. Cold weather won't snap it 
and hot weather won't make it sag. It's the greatest thing 
out f'*r farmers, stockmen and all other fence users which 
makes it a red hot proposition for dealers. It comes in rolls 
all ready to put up. It's easy to handle. Write for prices. 

The Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Company, Ltd. 

Oept. J, Hamilton, Ont. 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 



WOLVERHAMPTON 



FUSE 



White Countered 

Gutta Percha Safety 

Single and Double 
Tape, etc. 



Sole Canadian sales agents for 
WM. BRUNTON & CO., Wrexham, England 

INSIDE PRICES TO THE TRADE 



JAMES BARBER, Era Works, Sheffield 

Best quality only 
TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY, 

RAZORS, CARVERS, Etc. 

J. H ROPER 

Canadian Representative 
82 St. Francois Xavier Street - MONTREAL 



r 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



Because "The Twentieth Century 
belongs to Canada" the birth of 



™i 



Financial Post 

Was as inevitable as it was necessary 

first issue j Saturday, 

25,000 copies f j AN . 12th, 1807 



COPIES /r 

This Weekly will contain all the financial news available on 
investments. Accuracy is aimed at, but technicality is avoided. 

The Post will print reliable news in a readable manner. 
Finance has its romances as well as its dry bones. 

Every Investor, large or small, can find something that 
will interest him. Canadian securities will be fully and completely 
dealt with each week. 

A page will be devoted to banks and banking interests. There 
will be special articles for depositors. 

Every Young Man determined to make a success of life will 
be interested in the self-help articles. 



SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE FIRST ISSUE 

THEN AND NOW — An entertaining and instructive storv in parallel 
columns, showing what a well-known London paper thought of C.P.R. in l88l, and 
what it thinks 25 years later. 

THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC— AN INVESTOR'S ANALYSIS-THE 
QUESTION OF FIXED CHARGES— A COMPLETE MAP OF THE SYSTEM. 

THE HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY- The graphic story of the market 
advances of our oldest joint stock company. 

Other special articles by expert writers on Municipal Bonds, the Grain Situa- 
tion in the West, Branch Banks in the North- West, Cobalt Considerations, the 
Saving Habit. 

THE FINANCIAL POST OF CANADA is a twentieth cen- 
tury newspaper which no investor in Canada —especially at this 
time— can afford to be without. 

Mailed to any address in the Dominion, United States, Great 
Britain, and Europe for $3.00 annually. 

publisher by THE puvANCIAL POST COMPANY 

ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR NEAREST OFFICE 
TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG LONDON, ENG- 

511 Union Bank Bld°r. 83 Fleet St 




10 Front St. E. 



232 McGill St. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW GLASS FOR IMPORT 

We have Special Prices for Import 
for Spring Delivery. 

Do not place your order before see- 
ing our prices. They will interest 
you. 

Save money by importing direct. 

We offer special Strong Cases, thus ensuring delivery in 
good order. 

Send us your specification. We are always pleased to 
u ote prices. 

The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 




LONDON 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



From 



To 



1865 1907 

FORTY-ONE YEARS 

We have been pounding away making horse nails for the past forty-one years. Long 
enough to know how to make them don't you think? And have a fair acquaintance with the 
wants of the horseshoers who use them, and the hardware trade who sell them. And yet we 
haven't learned all. There is another firm whose representatives "know it all/' in fact it is stated 
'they are going to put us out of business in a year;" have a case of wine put up with our friend 
K. to this effect. Well! Well! Tennyson said in the Brook, "Men may come and men may 
go, but I go on for ever." We are going to try and hold out the year J 907, if not forever, and 
we think our "C" brand horse nails are of such good quality and that we have made friends 
enough in Canadian Hardware trade during the past forty-one years, to warrant us in thinking 
we shall. Will you do your share, by ordering the "G" brand. Don't accept substitutes; 
insist on having the brand of horse nails you order and let it always be the "C" brand. 

WISHING OCR FRIENDS A HAPPY AND PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR. 

Canada Horse Nail Company 

ESTABLISHED 1665 

MONTREAL 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Talking Points That Sell 
H. & /?. REVOLVERS 



Excellence of Construction 
Accuracy 
Rapidity of Action 
Absolute Safety 




Greatest Revolver 

Value for the 

Money. 



No matter which model or at what price it may be sold, every H. & R. Revolver under- 
goes the most rigid inspection both as to material and workmanship. Every part is accurate 
to the thousandth part of an inch and absolutely without a Maw. 

H. & R. POLICE PREMIER REVOLVERS 

combine more good features than any revolvers of other make selling for twice the money- 
The safety hammer enables them to be discharged quicker than any other hammer revolver- 
Automatic Ejector, Independent Cylinder Stop (found only on other make revolvers of 
much higher price), Light Weight, Beautiful in Design and Finish are the points that 
make them sell rapidly. 

Our Catalog tells about our full line and gives valuable selling points. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. W0R M C A E $ S S TER ' 



3/4 Park Ave. 







SPECIAL. STEEL 



| A *D TESTED 

"*DASA*e|Y opK 5 

- OONOAS CANADA. 





The Best Axe to Slle 

There are three requisites to a good sell- 
ing Axe : 

APPEARANCE. 
REPUTATION. 
QUALITY. 

The Appearance of an axe helps to sell it. 

The Reputation of an axe makes it easier 
to sell. 

The Quality makes it continue to sell. 

All these characteristics are. to be found in 
the Crown Jewel Axe to a marked degree, and in 
addition it can be sold at a price that nets a good 
profit to the seller. Is not that the axe you want to 
buy ? We want to sell it to you. 



The Dundas Axe Works 



To be continued. 



DUNDAS, ONT. 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




SPADES, SHOVELS, Etc. 

Entrust your trade to the house that 
can supply the "just right" Spades and 
8hovel8 

Uy.gctting in touch with 
us you will become ac 
quainted with the favorite 
lines: Towt^TM^nn 



"Peterborough,' "Lundy," "Irwin," and 'Hill" 

Send in a postcard for our Catalogue and you will see where we stand. 

The Peterborough Shovel & Tool Company, Limited, Peterborough, Out. 




WANTS 

MADE KNOWN IN 
"HARDWARE AND 
METAL" COLUMNS 
ARE SOON SATIS- 
FIED. 

TRY IT YOURSELF 



.ESTABLISHED 1849. 



.Japital and Surp! is, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World 

Executive Offices: Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling oircuin.i m.es of every seeder of mercantile credit. Its business may be denned as of the 
merchants, by the merchants. f>>r the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claims as an 
authority on all matters affecting comm< rcial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and oniinei tions have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available or!y by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial f diiciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained 1 y addressing the Company at any c f its offices. Correspondence invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



CALGARY, ALTA. 
HALIFAX. N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 



HAMILTON. ONT. 
QUEBEC;, QUE. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



LONDON. ONT. 
I-T. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL. QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada, Toronto. 



KEMP'S FACTORY MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 

Are Made to Last 



With roil rim 
bottoms are 
the kind that 
stand the 
wear and 
tear 





Sectiona/ View/ of Bottom 

Prompt attention given 
letter orders 



All Sizes of Tinned Iron in Stock 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, ONT. 



THE KEMP MFG. CO. OF MONTREAL 

58 McGill St., Montreal, Que. 



THE KEMP MFG. AND METAL CO., Limited 

McDermot Ave. E., Winnipeg, Man. 



22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRAVELLERS AND THEIR SPARE TIME 



Some Suggestions for the Improvement of it The Note Book Learning Languages 

Small Change of Time. 



Savings Bank for the 



The profitable use of spare time is a 
subject, of interest to every one ambi 
tious of success. Calvin 1). Wilson, 
writing: in The Sample Case, says of it : 

The commercial traveler's leisure dif- 
fers from that of men located at home. 
He who lives in one place has the 6\ 
en nigs in his house or in his office ; he 
has hours that he can count on. The 
travelling man's unoccupied seasons are 
in small change, waiting - for trains, or 
on railroad rides or buggy trips across 
country or in his hotel room. 

Vet he has many unemployed minutes, 
which in a week make hours, as dimes 
and quarters make dollars. What can he 
do with these that they may count for 
something in his success ? He can do 
many things, according to his tempera- 
ment, health, stage of culture and cir- 
cumstances. No detailed rules will suit 
everyone, but general suggestions may 
prove helpful and each can pick and 
choose according to his situation. If 
one does not have a surplus of energy 
if he has to save up his vital forces in 
order to concentrate them when in 
action, it behooves him to seize the idle 
moments for rest, to sit still in the de- 
pot, to doze on the cars, to retire early 
to his hotel room. Yet even many of 
the less well-equipped 'men physicallv 
might be benefited by change of mental 
occupation, according to the present be- 
lief that what we often need is not so 
much repose as the exercise of an- 
other set of faculties. 

The men with reserves of energy may 
again be divided into two classes, those 
who learn chiefly through their senses 
and such as learn partly by means of 
reading. The man with a markedly ob- 
jective mind, who reads principally in 
the book of men and nature might be 
diverted from his proper method by ad- 
vice to become a reader of books and a 
student. 

Keep a Note Book Handy, 

We have the impression that traveling 
men, as well as many others, lose much 
by often failing to have in their pockets 
notebooks for ideas, suggestions, plans. 
Oliver Wendell Holmes said : "No man 
ever yet caught the reins of a thought 
save as it galloped by him." It is an 
invaluable practice to have at hand 
blank book and pencil, and to get into 
the habit of seizing the reins of thought 
as they gallop by. Many of these, per- 
haps most of them, may prove worth- 
less or impracticable, but in any case 
you have the ideas written down for 
examination and scrutiny at leisure. 
The man with the notebook will soon 
find he is having more bright ideas than 
came to him formerly. Then he pre- 
serves the facts that come to him by 
the eve or car for inspection : he is not 
trusting to memory which may fail to 
bring back accurately what he wants 
when he wants it. The notebook habit 
causes him to put his ideas into some- 
what better shape than if he leaves them 
unformulated and floating in his mind. 



The notebook helps him to Learn the 
value of his own thoughts. It. gives him 
a record also of his own ponderings and 
experiences that may have in the future 

a larger value than hi' now perceives, li 

he saves his thoughts thus, records his 
observations, while waiting for trains 
or shut in his hotel room ami studies 
these jottings, he will probably find 
some diamonds among the pebbles. He 
may have jotted down in two minutes 
the idea tliat proves the germ of a 
Larger future. In times when no new 
ideas come, the moments may be well 
spent in looking over the notes already 
made. Such a course soon comes to 
have an interest of its own and is a 
pleasant occupation. It takes away the 




E. FIELDING, TORONTO 

Who takes care of the cash for the Commercial 
Travelers' Association of Canada, besides con- 
ducting a large business in Turpentine 
and Linseed Oil. 



feeling of wasting time and the spirit of 
impatience at delays. 

Study Languages. 
There is another line of mental effort, 
for which odd moments may be utilized, 
the result of which may be of especial 
value to traveling men who are able to 
follow it. This is the learning of a new 
language. No one needs to be more 
than reminded that in such a country as 
ours with its mixed population the 
knowledge of other languages than Eng- 
lish is of every day value. This is true 
particularly of traveling men, many of 
whom are carried by their business into 
communities where German is common- 
ly spoken, fine may be sent by his firm 
into the French-speaking portion of 
Canada or Louisiana. His employers 
mav require a man who can talk witli 
the Mexicans in their own tongue, or go 
into the settlements of the Swedes or 
Norwegians. Hi.- house may have ex- 
tensive plans that reach out over 

2 '. 



Europe. In anj o\ these cases the man 
who is alreadj equipped with a working 
knowledge of I lei man, French 01 - 
ish maj gel the plum of tin 
Being able to do what the tnajorftj 
cannot ( |«,, he gel 9 a liel |, i salai v, and 
if sent abroad gets foreign travel thrown 
in 

Spar.' minutes tell wonderfully in the 

acquiring of a new Ian , I be mind 

comes to it as a change and so with 
fresh interest. The little learned in a 
fragmentary wax gets in time to b< 
ed in the memory. I it course some men 
have no facultv at all for new Langi 
and such, after a fair trial, will ha 
limit their sphere of business to the peo- 
ple who talk their native tongue. But 
after all, most men can do far better in 
learning another language than they 
think at first thought. Nearly any one 
can get :i speaking acquaintance with 
German, French or Spanish, if he sets 
himself about it in the right way. A 
beginning can be made by the use of 
such little books as are to be gotten in 
almost any book store. These appear 
under some such titles as "How to 
Speak German Without a Teacher." Anv 
librarian or book dealer can give the 
information. Something at least mav 
be acquired in this manner and such a 
book may be carried about and conned 
anywhere at odd times. A few weeks of 
this study will bring a man along to a 
point where he will see what further 
help he needs. If he can be in one place 
long enough to get the assistance of a 
teacher, so much the better. He mav 
in some cases be able to get in touch 
with night schools or the classes in lan- 
guages in the Y.M.C.A. Presently he 
will be reading German or French books 
on his journeys and talking in these 
languages on his travels to any who un- 
derstand them. In due time through use 
ot spare time, he will be equipped for 
a wide field of employment. 

The ambitious traveling man who has 
gotten a working knowledge of one 
foreign language will not be likely to 
stop there. It is a general experience 
that the learning of other languages be- 
comes much easier after the first one. 
As is well known, all classes of people 
in Europe think little of knowing sever- 
al languages beside their own ; of course 
they often have the advantage of hear- 
ing these spoken around about them. 
Yet what is done by unschooled Euro- 
pean peasants ought to prove simple for 
as bright men as American commercial 
travelers commonly are. 

Spend Time in Systematic Reading. 
Reading with a purpose, for some def- 
inite end, is of course, a universally de- 
sirable use of spare time. This mayor 
may not be apparently of immediately 
available import, vet m av further us 
greatly. President Roosevelt has stated 
that he is fond of reading in his leisure 
hours the history of the dismemberment 
of the empire of Alexander the Great. 
This seems a rather remote subject from 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



American polities ; and yet the eomplet 
oil record bf the causes and changes that 
disintegrated one of the greatest em- 
pires of ancient times affords a picture 
in which to study the perils of modern 
ty. The statesman who is familiar 
with these stories ol the past is better 
able to understand and forestall the 
danger^ ol America. Cedil Rhodes, the 
great empire builder ol South Africa, 
was a constant reader of Gibbon's "De- 
cline and Fall of the Roman Empire," 
and doubtless thereby had Ins mind en- 
larged to under. -land the scope of the 
problems of the British Empire. 

The intellectual horizon >f tiie travel- 
ing man. whose actual business of sell- 
ins; goods may seem quite disconnected 
from general knowledge, will unquestion- 
ably be widened by the reading of his- 
tory, for example. The wider and 
stronger his mind, provided he does not 
.>ink into a book worm, the better he 
can do business, lie will have a clear- 
er and saner judgment. When reading is 
connected with daily activity there is 
little peril of its making men impracti- 
cal. Roosevelt is one of the best read 
men of the day and his scholarship has 
not impaired his practical judgment. 
The traveling man might well read all 
American history to advantage. He 
mierht take up an elaborate history of 
business from its beginning to its pres- 
ent developments. Still better, if he 
aims at culture, would it be to plan a 
course of reading such as would cover 
all the most important subjects, history, 
ethics, political economy, finance and so 
on. At the end of a few years, by use 
of spare time alone, he would have furn- 
ished him sell with all the general facts 
that any man in any occupation may 
have gained. -He surely should guard 
against feeding his mind exclusively 
with the very interesting but scrappy in- 
formation to be gotten from newspapers 
and magazines; such reading will at 
most afford but a superficial knowledge 
of anything. 

How One Man's Study Helped. 

If one has a particular bent, he should 
follow it if it is along lines that prom- . 
ise development. The man of inventive 
turn may, in his odd moments, note and 
work out ' some needed invention. The 
man of mechanical mind certainly might 
find pleasure and profit by searching the 
world as he goes about for the things 
that are needed or that can be improv- 
ed. Another man has a turn for mathe- 
matics ; if he has, he possessses a gift 
that, worked constantly and to its ut- 
most, may at any time bring forth fruit 
to his great advantage. We are told 
that Mr. Hughes, the governor-elect of 
New York, takes with him on his vaca- 
tions books on mathematics and such 
works as Kant's Philosophy. When he 
had the investigation of insurance mat- 
ters on his hands, his great skill in 
mathematics served him well. It seems 
a long way about for a lawyer to spend 
time on mathematics and philosophy; 
yet mathematics in this case, as in 
many another, worked directly into his 
practice and Kant's Philosophv doubt- 
less kept him in touch with noble views 
of human life, and with processes of 
pure reason. Likewise, the commercial 
traveler may find any real study while 
in his leisure. The improvement of mind 
will certainly serve him and the particu- 
lar knowledge may at any time fit into 
a place in his work. 



There are still other men who are 

travelers who have in them, perhaps in 

an undeveloped slate, the gilt ol writ- 
ing for the press. The leisure of such 
may be well employed by writing of 
their interesting or unusual experiences 
tor the newspapers or magazines, or pre- 
paring material lor a book, a story, a 
novel, or a volume on business or on- 
their particular kind of work. .Many 
writers would think they had a gold 
mine if they were in possession of the 
impressions and experiences of such 
commercial travelers as have long made 
their rounds over a great scope of coun- 



try. 



Reading for Relaxation. 



Reading for relaxation has its fit 
place and seasons and the commercial 
traveler requires, at least at times, to 
get away from the actual world into the 
realm of romance and of poetry and he 
does well to permit himself the privi- 
lege within reason. He surely ought 
besides to equip himself with some of 
the vital books that impress the princi- 
ples of sound faith and wise living. He 
cannot afford to be without a strong 
grasp nn the truth and his spiritual re- 
lations and duties. Otherwise, the spare 
moments will be the seasons of depres- 
sion and of darkness. The man who is 
brave in the actual contact with men 
and with business is apt to feel un- 
nerved and cheerless in the idle hours. 

'Tis not in the battle nor in the 

strife 
We feel benumbed and wish to be no 

more 
But in the after silence on the shore 
When all is lost us but a little life." 

In the lonely times, in the lull of the 
battle, we need anchorage and hope and 
faith. He is wise who, at such times, 
has in his grip a book that will re- 
kindle his soul and show him the great 
truths that remain and are the same 
both when we are glad and busy and 
when we are listless and solitary. 

The opportunities for exercise and im- 
provement of health in odd moments 
should not be overlooked. On journeys 
Talmage used to get off the train during 
its stops and walk briskly up and down 
the platform for a few minutes. When 
he was lecturing, he would take a street 
car line from his hotel to the country 
and treat himself to a five or ten min- 
utes' run. The commercial traveler who 
has ten minutes wait at the depot can 
step out into the open and fill his lungs 
with fresh air or snatch a brief walk for 
a few squares. The spare minutes of 
each day will do much to invigorate him 
if he seizes them. 



KNOW THE GOODS YOU SELL. 

At the recent banquet of the Com- 
mercial Travelers' Association of Can- 
ada held in Toronto, Thomas Kinnear, 
a successful wholesale grocer, empha- 
sized the importance, of a traveler tell- 
ing tin' truth about the goods he sells. 
"It pays in the long run," he said, 
"and you may lose an order now and 
again, but the loss is only a temporary 
one. Your customer will come back 
when he finds out that you have dealt 
honestly with him. Learn to know you] 
goods, study them thoroughly so that 
you can speak emphatically and author- 
itatively when selling. If you are thor- 
oughrj posted on your goods no com- 
24 



petitor tan draw a herring across the 
t rack anil kill \miii sale " Mi . Kinnear 
also laid stress upon the improvement 
in the system of selling goods. It was 
different now to thin, years ago, when 
it was the almost unbreakable custom 
to take > ..hi customer out for a drink, 
before making a sale. The reverse is 
iimw the case it seemed to him that 
(his was nothing more or less than 

buying trade, lie didn't believe in lm\ 
ing trade. It was not necessary. Su- 
perior knowledge on the part of the 
traveler, properly conveyed to his cus- 
tomer, will win out in the end. 



SUCCESSFUL JOBBERS 
AND SALESMEN. 



No. 34, 



P. W. Lamplough & Co., one of Mont 
real's manufacturers' agents and job- 
bers, have recent ly secured the services 
of F. 0. lirenton as their representa- 




T. H. BRENTON, 

Representing F. W. Lamplough & Co., 

Montreal. 

tive on the road. Mr. Brenton, al- 
though a young man of 30, has already 
made a name for himself in hardware 
circles. 

He successfully represented the Jas. 
Stewart Mfg. Co. of Woodstock, Out., 
in Western Canada for '6i years, and in 
that time, by dint of hard work and a 
pleasant disposition, worked up a very 
extensive connection among western 
hardware dealers. 

F. W. Lamplough & Co. have the 
agency for some of the finest lines on 
the market to day, and in view of the 
fact that Mr. Brenton will cover the 
field from coast to coast, he should 
soon be well known to the trade, who 
we feel sure will receive him in the way 
he desen. i 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




IMPROVEMENTS AT PORT ARTHUR 

Within the last three months the 
Marks ( layel Qobia Co.. Port Arthur, 
have made extensive improvements in 

the way of reducing t!u> risk of fire 
on their premises, having installed 
nine Bowser Oil Pumps, the tanks of 
which are located in an absolutely fire 
proof vault in the basement, which is 
just completed. They have, also in 
stalled one of Deys' Time Registers. 
which is working satisfactorily, their 
staff numbering 35. It is also their 
intention in the near future to instal 
an up-to-date electric cash carrier sys- 
tem and electric elevator. 

"Our Xmas business Ear excused 
any previous years." they write. "We 
had some good windows but unfortun- 
ately were unable to have them photo- 
graphed, through frost caused by a 
crack in the plate glass. However, in 
the future, we hope to send you from 
time to time, photographs of our dis- 
plays." 

"By the wav." continues their Let- 
ter, "we have just completed our con- 
tract for the largest freight sheds in 
tiie Dominion, for the C.P.R. at Fort 
William, built of galvanized eorrugat- 
ed iron. 000 feet long by 60 feet wide." 



NEW SPORTING GOODS FIRM. 

G. A. Brittain, of the Ashdown Hard- 
ware Co., and K. J. McKay of the 
Hingstcn-Smith Arms Co., Winnipeg, 
have joined in a partnership under 
the name of the Western Sporting 
Goods Co., and will do business in the 
Stobait block, on Portage Ave. They 
expect to open for business by the be- 
ginning or the middle of February. 
Messrs. Britton and McKay have bei n 
for the past few years among the fore- 
most of Winnipeg sportsmen. 



UP-TO-DATE LISTOWEL STORE. 

Messrs. Adolph & Bonnett. Listowel, 
are removing their stock to their new 
stand, which they have had specially 
fitted up for them. When they get 
nverything into position they will have 
the most up-to-date hardware store in 
the district, says the Listowel Banner. 
The new stand will give them more than 
double the capacity for the display of 
their large stock. The front has been 
entirely rebuilt, with new show win- 
dows, enclosed, over which is placed 
prismatic glass, furnishing excellent in- 
terior light throughout On one side 
of the store have been placed 480 draw- 
ers, all carefully sampled, so that goods 
will be displayed and instantly acces- 
sible. Large wall show cases have been 
1 ,,'f in for the display of silverware 



on one side and tools On the other, and 
complete apartments for sorting and 
handling glass built at the end <>f the 
shelves. In fact the classification of 

the whole stock has been syslemaliz 
e,i so that any article can be gO| al at 
once, in the rear and in part of t he 
upstairs are two store houses when' 

SUaplllS sti ck w ill he carried,. The 
workshop for the tinsmithing depart- 
ment is located al the real upstairs. 
The basement is floored with cement 
and well lighted, and will be used for 
the heavier bulk goods. 

ONE OF ORILLIA'S STORES. 

The Orillia Hardware Company, which 
is composed of W. E. Anthony, for 20 

years employed with Peaker & Son. 
Brampton, ami S. L. Mullett, who was 
11 years in Seaforth, and had four 
years Western experience, a year ago 



and nails. The second floo 
used to display stoves, and for I In- 
■ d' unsaleable goods. 
Me>sis. Mullell & Anthony are e 

prising advertisers, and strong believers 

in up-to-date w indow dressing. 

EIG CHANGE AT VICTORIA. 

A- recently announced in tin - • co] 

urns. Messrs. Griffin & Greenshaw, of 

the linns of Kakilis & Griffin and Kan 
dall & Greenshaw, both of Shoal Lake. 
Man., have purchased the old establish- 
ed business of Xichoiies ix Renouf, Vic- 
toria, B.C. The new firm are remod- 
eling, enlarging and renovating their 
-ion-, which is located on a splendid 
corner only a short block from the busi- 
ness centre of the city. 

When the B.C. Hardware Company, 
the linn's business name, is read;. 
business, their store will be one of the 
most modern in British Columbia. Two 
new windows will be installed, one on 
Broad St., the other on Nates. The 
entrance will be large and set off by 
immense pillars on each side. The 

Stoie will extend the full length of the 

structure, the office being placed on the 

second floor at the rear for the purpose 




CANADIAN HARDWARE STORES, No. 11— The Orillia Hardware Company's Store. 



bought the stock and leased the premises 
of (I. II. White, Orillia. 

A new brick workshop 25 x 40 feet, 
has been built, in which their plumbing 
steam-tit ting and metal work branches 
are conducted. Noteworthy among their 
contracts during the past season has 
been the steam heating plant installed 
in the Methodist Church at Orillia. 

The accompanying cut shows a view 
of the main floor of their store, which 
is 35 -x 120 feet, and is connected by an 
arch of about 14 feet, to a room which 
is used exclusively for the display of 
stoves, tinware and farming tools. Con- 
needed by a tire proof door is the oil 
house, equipped with the latest improv- 
ed oil tanks. In the rear are three 
buildings used for storing old stoves, 
poultry netting, wire, and cement. Be- 
neath the main shop and stove room is 
a full sized celler. which contains their 
slock of rope, wooden ware, white lead. 
2S 



of increasing the accommodation, 'finis 
the alterations ^planned will improve 
the lighting, making the general apart- 
ment more cheerful than at present. 
They will also increase the floor 
space, this being necessary on account 
of the large amount of new stock or- 
dered. As members of the new firm 
are both experienced men having plen- 
ty of enterprise and every confidence 
in the future of the Canadian West. 
their success seems assured. 



The St. Lawrence Saw and Steel 
Works Company has been incorporated 
with a total capital stock of (40,000, 
to manufacture saws, hits, shanks, axes, 
shovels, also machinery of all kinds. The 
chief place of business will be at Sorel, 
One., and the directors are. C. I). Pont- 
briand, .1. Pontbriand, H. M. Pont- 
briand. of Sorel, and T. I). Pontbriand, 
of Chicoutimi, Que. 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



RETAIL HARDWARE ASSOCIATION NEWS 

Official news of the Ontario and Western Canada Associations will be published in this department. All correspon- 
dence regarding association matters should be sent to the secretaries. If for 
publication send to the Editor of Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 



FROTEST AGAINST PARCELS POST 
executive committee of the On- 
tario Retail Hardware Association urge 
tbe trade throughout Canada to protesi 
against the proposed Legislation extend- 
ing the parcels post tu include a co.d. 
collection feature. They suggest that 
every retail dealer mail a letter t<> the 
Postmaster-General so thai it will ar- 
rive in Ottawa about Feb. 1. 

The accompanying draft form of let- 
ter should not he copied entire, hill 

i> suggested as a basis upon which t<> 
outline an argument against the pro- 
legislation. All letters should be 
written on th'' linn's business paper. If 
the local member of Parliament has not 
been written vet he should be asked to 
oppose the measure by a letter or 
petition signed by every retail mer- 
chant in each town or village. 

THE PRESS IS MUZZLED. 

How many hardware dealers in Can- 
ada lead accounts recently of serious 
eievati r accidents in Toronto depart- 
mental stores .' A woman was killed 
•n Eaton's store, but the daily papers 
merely announced the fact. A crowd- 
ed elevator crashed down several stor- 
ies in Simpson's and several had to be 
taken l<> the hospital with broken legs 
and < ther injuries. As before, the mat- 
ter was very briefly referred to by the 
daily press. 

As pointed out in these columns before, 
the leading daily papers in Canada are 
controlled by capitalists largely in- 
terested in the big mail order houses. 
This fact constitutes a serious danger 
as tin.' press is becoming an increasing 
: for good or ill in the life of the 
pi ople. 

THE QUESTION BOX. 

livery hardware merchant in Ontario 
is invited to send short questions on 
trade matters to the editor of Hard- 
ware and Metal. These will be publish- 
ed mi the association page before the con- 
vention and then answered at the con- 
vention by some one selected by the 
president, a general discus-ion follow- 
ing, a repori of which will be given in 
Hardware and Metal tor the benefit of 
those unable to attend. 

The questions should be sent in a! 
once so that they can Ik announced 
1 i fore the convention. If time i er- 
n its questions may also lie asked at 
the convention but those received be- 
forehand will, of course, receive first 
attention. 



PROFIT IN MUTUAL INSURANCE. 

The last i|uarterl> statement of the 
financial condition of the Retail Hard- 
ware Mutual Fire Insurance Company 
of Minnesota is undoubtedly the mosl 
satisfactory from the standpoint of the 
policy-holders of any statement ever 
issued by the company. 

A healthy increase in business over 



io incmiiinis was 13 per cenl., making 

I he total cost of . 1 . > i 1 1 -_; business, includ- 
ing losses and expenses, l."> per cenl. 

'I'he company now has a cash reserve 
of upwards of $86,000, which is steadily 
being increased by (he addition of a 
reasonable percentage of the profits 
each year. The fact that the expense of 
doing business was only 13$ of the 



Draft Form of Letter. 



1IMI7 



I'o the Honorable Mi. Lemieux, 

» Postmaster General, Ottawa. 

Deal Sir,— We understand that you are preparing an 
amendment to the law providing for the existing parcels 
post system, the said amendment being intended to pro- 
vide lor the collection on delivery of parcels. Such a 
system would enable mail order houses to send goods 
■C.O.d. to any part of the country in competition with local 
retailers;. 

The kuge depart mental stores are already injuring 
local merchants to a tremendous extent and any change 
in the postal laws which would favor them would he a 
great injustice to the thousands of merchants who have 
their capital invested in the small towns and cities 
throughout Canada, aiding by their presence, their en- 
ergy and their taxes in the up-building of the small com- 
munities upon which Canada's future prosperity must 
depend. 

We do not ask for any special privilege and protest 
against the mail-order houses being given any favors. 
'I'he proposed legislation would lend Io reduce the num- 
ber of retailers, thus destroying competition, depreciat- 
ing the value of real estate in Hie towns and having a 
similar effect upon the Earming districts, as well as tend- 
ing to decrease the opportunities for pleasure enjoyed by 
Hie fanner's family. The deserted farm districts of the 
New England States are an object lesson to avoid. 

We trust that you will see the fairness of our argu- 
ment that the legislation would he detrimental to the 
continued progress and development of this fair Domin- 
ion and we would ask thai you reconsider your announced 
intention of introducing the proposed amendment. 
Yours very truly. 



the amount written during the corre- 
sponding period of the previous year. 
is reported and the company was . n 
abled to add 10 per cent, of the prem- 
iums received to the reserve fund and 
then declare a return dividend for the 
year l!l<>7. id' 15 per cent. 

'I'he ratio of losses to premiums was 
■ VI per cent., while the ratio of expel 
26 



amount or premiums received, speaks 
volumes for the conservative manage- 
ment which I he company has enjoyed 
ami is one of the strongest arguments in 

favor of the mutual form of insurance, 

when properly conducted. 



Thej that stand waiting for fortunes, 
will never wear out their shoes. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Stoves and Tinware 



IMPORTANCE OF FIREPLACES IN 
HEATING. 

In discussing the question of beating 

a village duelling by means of stoves 
Dr. Harvey B. Bashore states that the 

halls are usually cold and, in addition, 
even in the rooms where stoves are 
placed the floors are from (i to 8 de- 
grees colder than the temperature 4 or 
5 feet above, a fact easily proved by 
experiment. As a consequence one's 
feet are just so much colder than one's 
head and shoulders. These two defects, 
cold halls and floors, are certainly fac- 
tors in producing catarrhal inflamma- 
tion of the throat and nose, if nothing 
worse. To remove these defects to a 
minimum it is necessary to alter some- 
what the construction of the rooms. 
Every one knows the value of the open 
prate, not so much as a heater, but as 
an equallizer of room temperature, and 
herein lies our remedy. Every room 
should have such a prate, or its equiva- 
lent, simply an airshaft connected with 
the chimney and opening into the room 
at the floor level. An airshaft so ar- 
ranged and of suitable dimensions, 
answers almost as well as an open grate 
and furnishes the means whereby rooms 
may be heated very well with ordinary 
stoves. 

When a room which has no fireplace 
is heated, the heated air rises and 
spreads along the ceiling in a thick 
cloud, and if a window is opened the 
warm air rushes out before it has done 
much good ; if, on the other hand, there 
is an open grate, some of the hot air 
escaping up the chimney creates a par- 
tial vacuum ; this, consequently, creates 
in the room a movement towards the 
opening, and the upper heated air is 
more diffused about the room, making 
the temperature more uniform. 

The halls, whether they contain a 
stove or not, should have an airshaft, 
for it will assist somewhat in "sucking 
out" the heated air of the adjoining 
rooms. A small oil heater placed in the 
lower hall will be of assistance in keep- 
ing the hall temperature at the right 
point. 

TIN CANS UNIVERSAL. 

"The American tin can has revolu- 
tionized the world," said a millionaire 
tin can manufacturer, recently. "It has 
belted the globe and conquered the hea- 
then nations in all lands. Last year in 
Japan I saw American tomato cans 
doing service as flower pots. In China 
I found salmon cans from this country 
used as soup ladles, and up in the Hima- 
layas I saw painted tin cans used as 
head dresses for some of the idols." 

He may have added that American 
tin cans are used as hand mirrors by 
South Sea Island belles, and as orna- 
ments dangling from their necks by 
some of the Patagonian chiefs. In the 
Antic regions Peary found Eskimos us- 
ing tin cans, that were originally packed 
with a favorite brand of California 
peaches, for bird traps.. The bright 



flashing of t he t in on the top of a pole 
attracted the curiositj of the birds, so 

t hey could lie induced to tl\ close to i be 

hunters. A queer sorl of tambourine oi 
drum was found by one explorer in the 

Terra del FuegO Islands made out of 
tin cans A tribe of Indians on the 
shores oi Behring Strait picked up an 
American tin can winch had been wash 
ed ashore, and preserved it as a strange 
relic of the sea. When a white explore! 
visited them, the Indians were equally 
divided as to its origin. Some thought 
it was the skin of a new kind of sea 
monster, and others a memento from 
I In- gods, with powers for good or evil. 
It was sacredly preserved and admired 
until the white visitor presented the 
Indians with half a dozen similar cans 
after he had eaten the contents of soup 
and vegetables from them. 

NEW McCLARY TRAVELER. 

Gordon Ritchie, for a number of years 

head of the selling staff of the Sherwin 

Williams Company, Montreal branch, 

has severed his connection with this 




GORDON RITCHIE, 

Who will represent the Montreal Branch of The 

McClary Mfg. Co. in future. 

firm and accepted a position on the 
traveling staff of the McClary Manufac 
taring Company. 

Salesmen, like poets, are said to be 
"born, not made" and Air. Ritchie is 
peculiarly destined to make a succ< -- 
"on the road." He is alert, well cda 
cated, speaks English and French flu- 
ently, has a quick eye, full of go and 
snap, and. withal, is unassuming and ex- 
tremely popular. 

Gordon is a young man who will 
the McClary Manufacturing I 
pany with faithfulness and energy. 

27 



\ L B manager for 

the McClary Compa • be congratu- 

lated upon this, the late I acquisition to 
bis staff of salesmen. 

KITCHEN UTENSILS. 

The accompanying cu1 shows one ol 

I he iii. on hues inanufact urerl li\ - 1 - - 1 

xh.iu and Son,, ol Wolverhampton, 
Eng., who have bu1 latelj undertaken 

the in.. inn, hi ure of kitchen utensils in 
aluminum, tin, steel, brass, and copper, 

to which they have given -their well 




"Governor Brand" Kitchen Utensils. 

known mark "Governor Brand." They 

are represented in Canada In -l II. 
Roper, x2 St. Francois Xavier St., 
Montreal, who will supply any dealei 
with information, and a fully illustrated 
i at alogue of t hese goods. 



STOVE SUGGESTIONS. 

Hardware merchants are seeing the 
Kteat need of handling a good line ol 
stoves. In fact hea'/y hardware is be- 
coming more generally handled everj 
year. Most merchants select some good 
line and secure a monopoly on it, and 
lake great interest in making it a lead- 
er. To do so, a guarantee from the 
manufacturer should be procured, guar- 
anteeing the baking and cooking quality 
of the stove. A great main- things have 
to he contended with in the sale of 
stoves. 

First, the stove should be carefully 

studied. A trip to the factory would 
enable the dealer to talk intelligently 
on the const met ion of the stove, also 
to compare it with any weak points on 
other prominent stoves 

Second— The place where the stove is 
to be placed should be studied, soring 
that the flue is in perfect condition, 
which is easily done by lighting a piece 
of paper and placing it in the pipe hole, 
to see if the draft is all right. 

Third— A great many people want 
stoves on trial. While' this method of 
selling may be .ill right with parties 
with whom you are intimately acquaint- 
ed, it would not be well to give every 
person that privilege, as some are never 
satisfied, and may sec a very elaborate 
looking cheap stove, which they think 
would suit them much better than your 
more serviceable one. Unless some 
agreement is made, whereby if the stove 
is found O.K., the parties would be 
made to retain it, the dealer will have 
to take tin- stove hack, explaining that 
it will be necessary to sell it as second- 
hand. 

A good plan for this time of year is 
to have a special stove sale, it being 
much better to sell surplus stock than 
having money tied up all year, as it 
could be placed to much better advant- 
age buying new Spring goods, 'f 
different lines are carried, select one 
and advertise a special sale, not neg- 
lecting to quote prices in your ad., also 
drawing attention to any special fea 
lure of the stove. 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



Hardware -Metal 



Established 



1888 



The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

JOM.\ B4Y.VE MACLEAN - President 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in 
ihe Provinces of British Columbia, Alberta. Saskat- 
chewan. Manitoba. Ontario. Quebec. Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick. P.E. Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES : 

232 McGill Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 

511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3726 

- 88 Fleet Street. E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim 

Telephone, Central 12960 

branches: 

1001 Teutonic Bldg. 

J. Roland Kav 

No. 7 Market Whart 

Geo. S. B. Perry 

Agence Havas, 8 Place de la Bourse 

92 Market Street 

Louis Woli 

Orell Fussli & Co. 



Montreal. 
Toronto, 
Winnipeg, 
London, Eno. 

Chicago, It i . 



St. John. N.B. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Paris. France - 
Manchester. Eno. 
Zurich, Switzerland 



Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. 6d., elsewhere - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

_ . , , ,, f Adscript, London 

Cable Address | Adscript , Canada 



PROFIT SHARING IN MONTREAL. 
The .las. Walker Hardware Company 
oi Montreal, have adopted the profit- 
sharing system in the running- of their 
business. There will not be any ma- 
terial difference in the business itself, 
with the exception that Messrs. Jas. 
and I). S. Walker will give over the 
management to F. Max Hill, who for 
several years was one . of the managers 
of Weed o: Co., of Buffalo, N.Y., and, 
previous to that, connected with the 
Vale & Towne Manufacturing Company, 
of New York City. .Mr. Hill has the 
reputation of being one of the best 
posted hardware men in the country, 
and the addition of his experience is 
counted on being quite a factor to the 
concern. 

Messrs. Jas. and D. S. Walker will 
not wholly disassociate themselves with 
the business, but will remain as direct- 
ors, occupying the positions of presi- 
dent and vice-president respectively. It 
has always been the policy of this firm 
to recognize faithful and capable ser- 
vice, and the opportunity to enter the 
company has been readily accepted by 
its employes. Several of the oldest em- 
ployes have been given a block of stock 
in the new company, and the remainder 
will participate in the profits. 

This is the 50th anniversary of the 
firm, it having been established in 1857 
by Jas. Walker, the father of the 
above mentioned gentlemen, and strange 
say, the business has never moved 
more than one block from where it 
started. It at present occupies the 



build og iu'\i the Bank of Toronto, on 

St Jamee St., and extends right 
through to Not if Dame St., where the 
shipping is done. This property lias 
recently been acquired by the firm. 

Although the stoic is well and finely 
fixed up— being considered one of the 
liest laid out hardware stores on the 
continent— Mr. Hill, who is of a pro- 
gressive nature, contemplates many 
changes, which will not only add great- 
ly to the general appearance of the 
store, but will facilitate the filling of 
orders. Paints and several other lines 
will also be added and it is confidently 
expected that the united and loyal in- 
terest of all connected with the com- 
pany will insure for the customers of 
the firm the best service the trade can 
offer. 



EXHIBITION IN MONTREAL. 

"I to the Citizens Want an Annual 
"Exhibition Held in Montreal?" is the 
title of a booklet issued by the Mont- 
real Business Men's League, which was 
incorporated and established six years 
ago — one of its objects being to adver- 
tise and bring people to Montreal. 

An exhibition would no doubt attract 
a large number of visitors to the city 
and prove of great material advantage 
to the citizens. The position of Mont- 
real is more advantageous than that of 
almost any city in Canada, for the 
bringing in of visitors from a distance. 
The Province of Quebec has a distinct 
link with the densely nopulated Eastern 
States. Thousands of the residents, of 
that part of the United States would 
avail themselves of the incentive offered 
of visiting Canada upon such an occa- 
sion. Interest in the country, relatives 
and friends in Canada, cheap railwav 
fares and former residence here, would 
all combine to brine to Montreal a vast 
number of well-to-do people, whose 
"ready-spending" characteristics would 
greatly swell the profits of merchants, 
hotels, boarding houses, etc. People go 
to the Toronto exhibition from all over 
America. Why not Montreal ? 

An exhibition in Montreal would not 
alone bring in a direct and important 
new revenue to the citizens in every 
conceivable way, but would serve to 
advertise the citv abroad. Toronto ex- 
hibition has made that city widely 
known in all parts of the world, and 
has, in a great extent, advertised Can- 
ada as a progressive country. 

Advertising pays, but more advertis- 
ing pays better. If the Toronto exhibi- 
tion helps to advertise the country in 
any way. it's onlv reasonable to sup- 
pose that an exhibition in Montreal 
would help along the good work the 
Toronto business men are alreadv doing. 
There is no part of the Dominion in 
28 



which exhibitions in the agricultural 

districts are more successful, or better 
attended bj the community in general, 
throughout the province, than in Quebec 
and it's up to Montreal to organize such 
an exhibition), to finance and manage it 
as a public enterprise for the benefit of 
the city, and of the province and Do- 
minion at large 



SIC 'EM. 

"The trouble with some business 
men," remarked a manufacturer who is 
well known for his enterprise and busi- 
ness enthusiasm, "is that they are 
lacking in the quality of energy. A man 
cannot do anything in business unless he 
has got some energy about him, and the 
more he has the better. There are some 
dogs that will bark at a tramp but the 
moment the tramp makes a movement 
towards them they will turn tail and 
get around the corner of a house. Take 
a fox terrier, on the other hand, and 
sic him on, and he gets right down to 
business and sails right in. When I 
hear business men talking in gloomy 
tones and displaying apathy, T just say, 
"Sic 'em. Sail in and tackle your 
difficulties." 



SIMPLE ACCOUNT SYSTEM. 

Although there is no business too 
small for the loose leaf system to be 
adapted to some readers may be inter- 
ested in the simple account system 
adopted by Bruce and Sanderson, a To- 
ronto retail firm who find it impossible 
to do a straight cash trade. 

By using counter checkbook an item- 
ized statement accompanies each order 
and a copy is kept. These copies are 
kept on file in a quarter cut oak filing 
cabinet. An ordinary Shannon file does 
the rest. Alphabetically arranged on 
this file is an ordinary bill head of the 
firm for each customer and under it a 
sheet of plain paper. Each morning the 
totals of the orders sent out the day 
before are charged on these bill heads 
and a piece of carbon paper gives a 
copy on the plain sheet below. Suppose 
a customer comes in to pay. His ac- 
count is made and can be produced in 
an instant. If he pays in full the bill 
on the file is receipted and handed to 
him and the copy is destroyed as being 
of no further use. The copies of orders 
up to that date are also destroyed as 
being of no further use. If the cus- 
tomer pays something on account, a 
credit is made on the bill head and that 
is given him as a receipt, showing a 
balance due. A new bill head and clear 
sheet are put on the file and the balance 
brought forward. As soon as enough 
is paid to clear this balance the copy 
of the old bill is thrown away. 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



The invoices are kept in a filing cabi- 
not reserved for them. All invoices of 
each firm from whom they buy are kept 
together arranged in order of date. In 
this way the wholesale dealings of the 
firm for years can be kept in one small 
cabinet without a scratch of a pen. 



THE BUSINESS SITUATION. 

By B. E. Walker, President Canadian Wank 
of Commerce. 

While we are enjoying an extraordin- 
ary prosperity, there are signs about us 
of a strain which must bring trouble if 
they are disregarded. We are a borrow- 
ing country, and we cannot be reminded 
of this too often. As we fix capital in 
new structures, public or private, rail- 
ways, buildings, etc., some one must 
find the capital in excess of what we 
can ourselves provide out of the sale- 
able products of our labor. The number 
of countries willing to buy our securi- 
ties has been steadily increasing, but 
we must not be blind, as we sometimes 
seem to be, to the fact that our power 
to build depends largely on whether these 
countries have surplus capital to invest. 
By means of the cable the trading na- 
tions of the world have been brought 
very near together, and while nations 
of the world have been averted, and the 
adjustment of capital to the world's 
needs has been greatly improved, still 
for the same reason world-wide trouble 
in the money markets sometimes arises 
with a suddenness which is alarming to 
those at least who are not watching for 
the signs. We are passing through such 
a period just now, happily without a 
general breakdown, but unless we mend 
our ways we are not likely to escape a 
similar or still worse condition next 
autumn which may wreck our fair pros- 
perity. Europe is bearing the enormous 
cost of two great wars, both in the loss 
of capital actually destroyed and also 
in the loss to individuals from the de- 
cline in the values of the national se- 
curities of the countries interested in 
the wars. And since these wars, losses 
on an unexampled scale have occurred by 
earthquakes and fire. The volume of 
trade and the unusual amount of build- 
ing in many countries have at the same 
time vastly increased the amount of 
capital required. This has been accom- 
panied by a steady rise in prices 
throughout the world, and by a most 
pronounced and widespread advance in 
the scale of personal expenditure. It is 
true that it has also been accompanied 
by the greatest production of gold and 
of other commodities, but the effect of 
the various influences has naturally been 
to put upon the money markets a strain 
which has only just failed to cause a 
general breakdown of credit. To make 
the outlook still more serious, the 



United States, and other less Important 
countries, including Canada, contemplate 
expenditures on .1 very large scale for 
railway and other building. Tins, then, 
is a time for every prudent man to sur- 
vey carefully his financial position. If 
lie has debts he should consider how he 
will pay them if he should have to face 
world-wide stringency 111 money. Has he 
assets which the world needs for daily 
use, or assets which will sell only when 
the sun is shining ? If he is happily in 
easy conditions as to debt, he will, if 
he is wise, consider every circumstance 
arising in his business which tends to- 
wards debt instead of towards liquida- 
tion. As for those who are plunging in 
real estate at inflated prices and in 
mining stocks, nothing, we presume, but, 
the inevitable collapse which follows 
these seasons of mania will do any good. 



NO SPECIAL PRIVILEGES. 

Both jobbers and retailers are using 
their influence to induce members of Par- 
liament and the Postmaster General to 
see the unfairness of the proposed par- 
cels post legislation. To allow country 
postmasters to become collecting agents 
for the big mail order houses is to grant 
a special privilege to merchants who al- 
ready have great advantages over their 
smaller competitors. 

The retail merchants in the United 
Stales have suffered severely from the 
unfair competition of their big rivals 
and are up in arms against further ex- 
tensions of the special privileges given 
the departmental store by the U.S. Pos- 
tal Department. They were successful 
in heading off bills brought into the last 
Congress by Congressmen Hearst and 
Henry and are already preparing to 
make a stiff fight against similar legis- 
lation likely to be introduced into Con- 
gress this year. The big mail order 
houses have the cash, but the retail mer- 
chants have the votes and influence, 
which can put out of public life many- 
Congressmen and Senators unless they 
stand for the interests of their consti- 
tuents against the big city houses which 
pay no taxes in country districts and 
shirk their fair share in their city head- 
quarters. 

Two of the most recent developments 
in the States are the proposals to re- 
duce the rate on parcels of merchandise 
from one cent per ounce to three cents 
per pound, and the offer of W. D. Boyce, 
newspaper publisher, Chicago, to buy 
out the Postal Department and operate 
it as a private concern. Boyce repre- 
sents the big newspaper men who are 
making milions through departmental 
store advertising. His proposition is as 
follows : 

"To turn over the postollice business 
to a $50,000,000 private corporation un- 
der full Government regulation. To re- 
29 



duce by one-half all postal rati 
lisli rural postal express and apply busi- 
ness methods throughout. To pay the 
Government rental tor postollice quai 
ters, and chai ge its regulai rati [01 il 

il business. To place 111 chai 
well known railroad trattic expel 

whom the place has been olleieil al 

000 annually . To eliminate all smec 
politics, and the dcflcll To pay the 
Government all profits above 7 per cenl 
on capital." 
if Canadian retailers wish to preserve 

their rights and prevent the undue 

grow tii ol the mail ordei they 

must be alive and up and doing. In this 
issue the executive ol the Ontario 
tail Hardware Association suggest a 
letter that every dealer should lorward 
to the 1'osl master General about Feb. 1, 
inducing as many retailers as possible 
to sign the letter or forward a snnilai 
one. The suggestion is a good (one and 
should be acted upon. 



InLW WHOLESALE AT BRANDON. 

The incorporators of the recently 
organized Hanbury Hardware Com 
pany, Brandon, are: John Hanbury, J. 
rsrown, E. Johnston, J. Caldwell, and 
A. E. Carmichael. The last named was 
with Marshall Wells Company since 
their incorporation at \\ inmpeg and is 
now manager of the Hanbury Hard- 
ware Company. The new company will 
do wholesale business and have a mod 
em warehouse almost ready for oc- 
cupancy. The building has live stone-. 
80x100 feet, being on a spur track. 
They expect to be open for business 
March 1st. 



MONTREAL BOARD OF TRADE. 

George Caverhill has been nominated 
for the presidency of the Montreal 
Board of Trade; T. J. Drummond, for 
the first vice-presidency; C. B. Esdaile, 
as treasurer; Messrs. J. N. Dougal, and 
Alex. McLarin, for membership on the 
Board of Trade Council and Kaiquhar 
Robertson for the 2nd vice-presidency. 
Nominations close Jan. 18, and elec- 
tions will be held Jan. 29. 



BIG YEAR IN SKATES. 

Orders are practically all in and filled 
for skates for this season ; in fact tra- 
velers are already on the warpath again 
with new lines, and with improvements 
here and there, which will be appreciat- 
ed by hockey players and in fact by all 
who use skates. A number of orders 
have already been booked, and skate 
manufacturers seem to be off to a good 
start. 

Mr. J. S. Bowbanks of the Starr 
Manufacturing Co., Dartmouth, N. S . 
stated that many hardware dealers in 
Ontario had the impression that sales 
would be very light this season on ac- 
count of the mild winter last year. He 
pointed out, however, that their firm 
did business in all parts of the globe, 
where they had any skating, and the 
mild winter in Canada might mean a 
very cold winter in other countries, lie 
said his firm had made more skates this 
season than ever before, and had sold 
practically every one of them. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Har dware Trade Gossip 



Ontario. 

D. E. Rudd, dealer in creamer; sup- 
piies, was elected alderman in Guelph, 
la>t Monday. 

1.. A. Whitmore, hardware merchant 
of Edgley, called on the Toronto job 
bers this week. 

James T. Stewart, hardware nier- 
■ehanl of Manchester, lias sold his busi- 
ness t<> James Young. 

John Kelly, hardware merchant, was 
elected mayor of Oakville on Monday, 
after an exciting contest. 

J. J. Coffee, hardware merchant, 
Barrie, was elected to the Barrie Coun- 
cil iii the elections on Monday. 

F. W. Moffatt, stove manufacturer, 
Weston, was one of those elected to 
the Weston Town Council, last Monday. 

G. A. Binns, hardware merchant, 
Newmarket, was elected to the New- 
market Council at the elections this 
week. 

Alderman" S. Clark, master plumber, 
Hamilton, was re-elected to the Hamil- 
ton City Council at Hie elections this 
week. 

Joseph J. Bouchard, manager of the 
:St»r Iron Company. Montreal, was a 
visiter in Toronto on Saturday of last 
•reek. 

J. II, Crow, hardware merchant, Wet- 
land, wag elected mayor of that boom- 
ing burg by a substantial majority last 
Monday. 

]'. Chappelle, hardware merchant of 
Brown Hill, was a visitor in Toronto 
this week, calling on the wholesale 
hardware trade. 

Samuel Ry.ding, plumber of Toronto 
Junction, was one of the unsuccessful 
candidates for the Mayoralty of that 
town in the elections last Monday. 

J. B. Campbell, president of the Acme 
Can Works of Montreal, passed through 
Toronto last Saturday on his return 
east from a trip through Western Can- 
ada. 

Jos. Wright, of Bennett and Wright, 
Toronto, who sustained a severe wrench 
to his leg last Saturday, though still 
under the doctor V .are, is progressing 
favorably. 

II. N. Joy, of the Joy Manufactur- 
ing Company, stove manufacturers, To- 
. received serious injury to his 
head while skating on New Year's night. 
He is recovering slowly. 

T. E. Ransley, representing Greene. 
Tweed Company. New York, manufac- 
turers of Palmetto packing, attended 
the conference of Canadian Fairbanks 
salesmen in Toronto this week. 

Mount Forest has decided no! to 
abolish the Water Commission, of which 
W. G. Scott, hardware merchant, is a 



hading member. The vote took place 
at the municipal elections last Mjonday. 
Alderman Samuel Stevelv, hardware 
n i rchant, and Alderman Wm. Scarlett, 
of Wormian & Ward, woodenware 
manufacturers, London, were elected in 
the municipal elections in that city last 
Monday. 

0. M. Hodson, Toronto representa- 
tive of H. R. Ives & Company, Mont- 
real, spent several days in Montreal 
last week, conferring with other sales- 
men and managers of the company. 
George Davidson, Woodstock, and 

frank Griffin, Stratford, were the other 
Ontario men at the meeting. 

Frank Adams, who has filled the 
position of secretary for the Peter- 
borough Lock Manufacturing Co. for 
the past thirteen years, and who severs 
his connection with that company this 
week, was last Saturday made the re- 
cepienl of a handsome gold watch from 
the directors of the company. 

A. G. Buckham, manager of the re- 
tail department of the Hudson Bay 
Company's store at Winnipeg, was a 
caller on Hardware and Metal in To- 
ronto during the past week. Mr. Buck- 
ham reports a very good holiday busi- 
ness in Winnipeg. He has been visit- 
ing his old home at Brampton, Ont. 

Will Cluff, of Cluff Bros., Ontario 
selling agents for Warden King & Son, 
Montreal, met with a rather serious ac- 
cident a few days ago. While operat- 
ing his automobile the crank backed up 
on him and while not breaking any 
bones, tore the ligament of the arm and 
put it out of service for two or three 
weeks time. 

Andrew Riddell, stove dealer and 
plumber, St. Catharines, was re-elected 
mayor of that city last Monday by 
about 400 majority. The contest was 
a very keen one, owing to political dis- 
agreements, hut Mr. Riddell was sup- 
ported by the leading Oonseiwatives, as 
well as Liberals. Mr. Riddell was a 
visitor in Toronto on Wednesday. 

J. Taylor Webb, manager of the Win- 
nipeg branch of the Thos. Davidson 
Company. Montreal, was a caller on 
Hardware and Metal, on Tuesday. Mr. 
Webb is an enthusiastic westerner, and 
has boundless faith in the trade possi- 
bilities of Western Canada. He has 
been attending a staff conference at 
Montreal, and incidentally renewing old 
acquaintanceships in Toronto. 

Quebec. 

Adolphe Huot, Sorel, was in Mon- 
treal during the week. 

Geo. Larose, Beloieuil, Que., was seen 
in Montreal this week. 

N. McGillis, of Lancaster, was a 
visitor in Montreal during the week. . 
30 



A. G. Eastman, Sutton, Que., was in 
Montreal on business a few days ago. 

0. Pauze, L'Epiphanie, was a visitor 
at some of. the Montreal wholesale 
houses. 

N. Curry, of Rhodes, Curry & Co., 
Amherst, N.S., was in Montreal during 
the week. 

J. D. McBride, Cranbrook, B.C., is 
in Montreal, looking up the jobbers with 
whom he does business. 

11. R. Picketts, of Emerson & Fisher. 
St. John, N.B., has joined the travel- 
ing staff of Lewis Bros., Montreal. 

J. W. Harris, of J. W. Harris Co., 
Montreal, who has been confined to the 
house through illness, has returned to 
his desk. 

R. B. Cherry, representing Sargent 
& Co., manufacturers of builders' hard- 
ware, New York, is calling on the Mon- 
treal jobbers. 

Mr. Smith, of the Pike Manufactur- 
ing Co., Pike, N.H., manufacturers of 
sharpening stones, is in Montreal on 
business for his house. 

The Canadian branch of The Gillette 
Safety Razor Co., who were burned 
out lately, have opened up an office in 
the Mortimer Building, 2 St. Antoine 
St., Montreal, where all correspondence 
should be addressed in future. 

G. M. Edwards, of Henderson & 
Potts, paint manufacturers, Montreal, 
who has been suffring lately from ner- 
vous prostration, has returned from a 
trip to Boston, where he has been try- 
ing to forget business worries. 

M. Purvis, of Calgary, spent a few 
days in Montreal, and, like all western 
men, speaks most highly of the latter 
city, but prefers the beautiful climate 
and pure "ozone" of his western home. 
He has his office in Calgary with Lintan 
and Hall. 

H. G. Hollis, manager of the New 
York branch of the Lufkin Rule Co., 
was a visitor at the Montreal office of 
Hardware and Metal. Mr. Hollis, al- 
though he claims to be 60 years of 
age, doesn't look the part, is still hale 
and hearty, and "one of the boys." 

Western. 

The wife of Louis Moody, general 
manager of the Canadian Brass Works,. 
Winnipeg, died on Jan. 2nd at that 
place. 

Mr. McKean, foreman in the heavy 
hardware department of Geo. D. Wood 
& Co., Winnipeg, was waited on by the 
members of his department and present- 
ed with a handsome gold locket, suit- 
ably engraved as a token of the univer- 
sal esteem and respect in which he is 
held by his associates. 

T. Arthur Kennedy, Winnipeg City, 
traveler for the McOlary Manufactur- 
ing Company, before leaving on a trip 
for the East last week, was waited on 
by the members of the office and ware- 
house staff, and after an appropriate 
address, he was presented with a hand- 
some oak Morris chair. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Markets and Market Notes 

(For ciota/led prices see Current Market Quotations, page 70.) 



THE WEEK'S MARKET8 IN BRIEF. 
MONTREAL. 
Iron Pipe— Advanced. 
Turpentine— Two cents higher. 
Enamelware— New lists show advance. 

TORONTO. 

Plumbers' Enamelware — Ten per cent, ad- 
vance. 

Iron Pipe— New lists show advances. 

Lead Traps and Bends— Advanced to 40 off. 

Hot Water Boilers- No immediate change. 

Boiler Pitts — Advanced from 35 to 25 per 
cent. 

Furnace* — Five per cent, higher. 

Registers Advanced 5 per cent. 

Kltohen Enamelware— Prices withdrawn. 

Shovels — Advanced $1 doz. on net price. 

Step Ladders— Advanced lc. per ft. 

Rivets and Burrs— Advanced to 25 per cent. 

Oopper Bottom Boilsrsand Kettles— Advanced 
5 per cent. 

Oopper Pitts— Advanced 5 per cent. 

Factory Milk Cans— Advanced 5 per cent. 

Old Material— Several advances. 



Montreal Hardware Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 11, 1907. 

With the colder weather, business has 
picked up considerably, and the Ameri- 
can travellers are beginning to find 
their way to our side of the border. 

Dealers who place their orders for 
Spring goods early, are likely to save 
themselves quite a lot of cash and wor- 
ry, as manufacturers are away behind 
in their deliveries, and prices on all 
lines are expected to go considerably 
higher within the near future. 

Cow ties and sleigh bells are report- 
ed among the slowest movers this week. 

Sporting goods have also quieted 
down slightly to what they have been 
during the holidays. 

New prices are daily looked for on 
building paper. 

Wire nails remain firm, but an ad- 
vance in the price of horse nails is ex- 
pected shortly. 

It is also rumored that steel squares 
and planes (Stanley's), ate in line for 
an advance. 

AXES.— We quote : $7.60 to $9.50 
per dozen ; double bitt axes, $9.50 to $12 
a dozen ; handled axes, $7.50 to $9.50 ; 
Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a dozen, 
follows: No. 3, $1.25; No. 2, $1.50; 
No. li, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34- 
iiich, $2.20 a dozen; pick handles, No. 
2, $1.70; No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

LANTERNS. — Our prices are: 
"Prism" globes, $1.20; Cold blast, 
$6.50; No. 0, Safety, $4.00. 



COW TIES AND STALL FIXTURES 
are moving but slowly. We still 
continue to quote: Cow ties, dis- 
count 40 per cent, off list; stall 
fixtures, discount 35 per cent, off list. 

SLEIGH BELLS.- There lias bee,, a 
slight tailing off during the past week. 
Our prices still remain as follows: 
Back Straps, ■ 30c. to $2.50 ; 
body straps, 70c. to $3.50; York Eye 
bells, common, 70c. to $1.50; pear 
shape, $1.15 to $2; shaft gongs, 20c. to 
$2.50; Crelots, 35c. to $2; team bells, 
$1.80 to $5.50; saddle gongs, $1.10 to 
$2.60. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. -- Copper 

rivets and burrs advance slightly. 
Following are the quotations: Best iron 
rivets, section, carriage, and 

wagon box black rivets, tinned do., cop- 
per rivets and tin swede rivets, 60, 
10 and 10 per cent.; swede iron burrs 
are quoted at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, 
off new lists ; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 25 per cent, 
off, and coppered iron rivets and burrs 
in 5-lb. carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 
10 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 15 per 
cent., subject to usual charge for half- 
pound boxes. 

HAY WIRE. — Prices remain firm. Our 
quotations are : No. 13, $2.55 ; No. 14, $2.- 
05; No. 15, $2.80; f.o.b. Montreal. 

MACHINE SCREWS.— Trade is about 
as usual. We quote : Flat head, iron, 35 
per cent.; flat head, brass, 35 per cent.; 
Felisterhead, iron, 30 per cent.. Felister- 
head, brass, 25 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS— Scarce. Our dis- 
counts are : Carriage bolts, 3 and under, 
60 and 10; 7-16 and larger, 55 p. a; fancy 
carriage bolts, 50 p.c. ; sleigh shoe 
bolts, | and under, 60 per cent.; 7-16 
and over, 50 per cent.; machine bolts, f 
and under, 60 per cent.; 7-16 and larg- 
er, 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS.— Advance expect- 
ed shortly. Discounts are as follows: 
C brand, 40, 10 and 7 per cent.; M.R.M. 
Co., 55 per cent.; P.R. brand, 55 per 
cent. 

WIRE NAILS.— The market is now 
firm at $2.30 per keg base f.o.b. Mon- 
treal. 

CUT NAILS— We continue to quote: 
$2.50 per 100 lbs.; M.R.M. Co., latest. 
$2.30 per keg base, f.o.b. Montreal. 

HORSESHOES. — Our prices are: 
P.B. new pattern, base price, im- 
proved pattern iron shoes, light and 
medium pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.65 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.15. Light steel 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.25; featherweight, all sizes, 
No. to 4, $5.60. Toeweight, all 
sizes, No. 1 to 4, $6.85. Packing, up 
to three sizes in a keg, 10c. per 100 lbs. 

31 



More than three sizes, 25c. per 100 lbs. 
extra. 

mil. DIM; PAPER. New puces ex- 
peeled daily. 

I EMENT \\\) FIREBRICK.— No 
change in prices. We are .-lill quoting: 
"Lehigh" Portland in wood, $2.54, in 
cotton sacks, $2.39; in paper sacks, 
$2.31. Lofarge (.non-staining) in wood, 
$3.40; Belgium, $1.60 to $1.90 per bar- 
rel; ex-store, American, $2 to $2.10 ex- 
cars; Canadian Portland, $2 to $2.05. 
Firebrick, English and Scotch, $17 to 
$21, American $30 to $35; White Bros.' 
English cement, $1.80 in bags, $2.05 in 
barrels in round lots. 

COIL CHAIN.— Last week's advance 
still holds. We are quoting as fol- 
lows : 5-16 inch, $4.40; 3-8 inch 
$3.90; 7-16 inch, $3.70; 1-2 inch, $3.50; 
9-16 inch, $3.45; 5-8 inch, $3.35; 3-4 
inch, $3.20; 7-8 inch, $3.10; 1 inch, 
$3.10. 

SHOT — Our prices remain as follows: 
Fhot packed in 25-lb. bags, ordinary drop 
AAA to dust, $7 per 100 lbs.; chilled, 
No. 1—10, $7.50 per 100 lbs.; brick 
and seal, $8 per 100 lbs.; ball, 
$8.50 per 100 lbs. Net list. Bags less 
than 25 lbs., £c. per lb. extra, net ; 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, St. John, Halifax. 

AMMUNITION— The normal busi- 
ness is being done. Our prices arc- 
Loaded with black powder, 12 and 16 
gauge, per 1,000, $15; 10 gauge, per 
1,000, $18; loaded with smokeless pow- 
der, 12 and 16 gauge, per 1,000, $20.50; 
10 gauge, $23.50. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH.— We con- 
tinue to quote: In 100 foot rolls, $1.62j 
per hundred square feet, in 50 feet 
rolls, $1.67$ per hundred square feet. 

Toronto Hardware Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 11, 1907. 

Jobbers report a greai falling off in 
business during the last week, as many 
hardware merchants are taking stock. 
All orders being booked now are for 
Spring shipment. A great number of 
merchants were caught on the advance 
in building paper, and the number of 
advances which have SO rapidly taken 
place will help the tendency to order 
goods farther ahead. 

A number of minor changes are quot- 
ed this week, with a probable further 
advance in a great many lines. Copper 
rivets and burrs advanced from 27 
per cent, to 25 per cent, with the mar- 
ket in a very unsteady condition and 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



fui t her advance looked for. Screw! 
also advancing, hut t.. what extent is 
not vet known. Step ladders have also 
advanced lc. per toot, and are now 
quoted at 12c. All shovels have ad- 
-l.mi per dozen on lisl price, 
with further advance likely in the near 
future. 

Quotations on all enamelware have 

been withdrawn. Japanned ware has 

advanced 5 per cent., copper pitts from 

I per cent.> to 25 per cent., copper 

bottom tea kettles ami boilers from 35 

i pi i- cent., and factory milk cans 

from 1<> to :>."> per cent.. Furnaces and 

registers have also been advanced 5 per 

cent, as reported in our metal markets. 

AXES AND HANDLES.— Travellers 

booking orders for fall shipment. 

GARDEN TOOLS. While these var- 

iines have nearly all been booked 

Coi Spring shipment, quite a number of 

ciders are being received from mer- 
chants who had not ordered. An ad- 
vance is expected. 

WASHING MACHINES, ETC. 
It is expected more washing machines 

will be sold this year than ever before, 
as so many different lines are on the 
market, a great number of which will be 
found highly satisfactory. Wringers of 
Canadian make have so greatly improv- 
ed of late, that large orders are com- 
ing in, business in this line greatly in- 
sing. 

SPORTING OCX IDS.— While the last 
week very few orders have been receiv- 
ed, c"hl weather will greatly enliven 
that line. 

CHAIN— We still continue to 
quote: : 's in. $3.50; 9-16 in., $3.55; V2 
in., $3.60; 7-16 in., $3.85; 3-8 in., $4.10; 
5-16 in. $4.70; 1-4 in. $5.L0. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— An advance 
has been made on these articles, which 
ar ( . now quoted at 25 per cent, for cop- 
per and 60, 10 and lit for iron and 
tinned. 

SCREWS.- Are advancing, but fig- 
ures are not yet obtainable. 

BOLTS AND NUTS.— Demand is very 
good, but the supply is very hard to 
procure. 

TOOLS — Carpenters' tools, hand 
saws. etc. are in great demand, mer- 
chants buying largely in view of a fur- 
ther advance. 

SHOVELS.- -Not much doing at pre- 
sent, but a banner year is reported in 
the sale of snow shovels. 

LANTERNS.— Very little demand at 
present, as mosl merchants are stocked 
up. 

EXTENSION AND STEP LADDERS 
- An advance is quoted on slep ladders. 
which are now lie. per fool for 3 to 
t; feet, and 12c. ] e< foot for 7 to 10 
foot ladders. Waggoner e xtension 
luddei b, In per cent. 



l'Ol 1.T1JV NETTING— We quote: 2- 
nuli mesh, 1!> W.g., discount 50 and 1(1 
per cent. All others 5(1 per cent. 

Wlh'K FENCING. All galvanized 

and plain wire i> selling \er\ briskly, 
even at advanced prici s. 
OILED AND ANNEALED WIRE — 

(Canadian)— Gauge 11), $2. .SI ; gauge II, 
$2. .'(7 ; gauge 12, $2.45 per 100 lbs. 

WIRE NAILS. No further advance 
on nails i s yet to hand. Stocks are 
rapidly being repleted. 

CUT NAILS We quote $2.30 base 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto 20c higher. 

HORSENAILS— "C" brand, 40, 10 
and Ik oil list. "M.R.M." brand, 55 per 
cent. oft. "Monarch" brand, 50 and 7 A 
off. "Peerless," 50 per cent. oil. 

HORSESHOES— Our quotations con- 
tinue as follows : F.B. base, $3.05 ; 
"M.R.M. Co., latest improved pattern" 
iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.80 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.05 ; snow, No. 2 and larger, 
$L(i5; No. 1 and smaller, $4.30; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4.15 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.40 ; featherweight, 
all sizes, to 4, $5.75 ; toeweight, all 
sizes 1 to 4, $7. Packing, up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c. per 100 lbs. extra; 
more than three sizes in a keg, 25c. per 
100 lbs. extra. 

BUILDING PAPER.— Orders are now 

being booked at the advanced price for 
Spring shipments. 

CEMENT— We quote : For carload or- 
ders, f.o.b. Toronto, Canadian Portland, 
$1.95. For smaller orders ex warehouse, 
Canadian Portland, $2.05 upwards. 

FIREBRICK— English and Scotch fire 
brick $27 to $30 ; American low-grade, 
$23 to $25 ; high-grade, $27.50 to $35. 

HIDES, WOOL AND FURS.— The sup- 
ply of hides is in excess of the demand 
but the course of the market is uncer- 
tain. Prices are slightly lower than a 
week ago. 

HIDES, WOOL AND FURS— There 
aie hits of hides coming- in, and the 
market is pretty steady. Nothing is 
doing- in wool, and very few- furs are 
coming. There seems to be a shortage 
of furs, or the trapners are very late 
getting to work. Mink is very scarce, 
and lynx and fox and skunk are alsc* 
advanced. 

Hides, inspected, oowr and steers, ^ o. I ... 11 

" " " " No. 2 lo 

Country hides, flat, per lb., cured 10 

green 09 

Call skins, No. 1. city u 11! 

" " No. 1, country 11 

Lamb skins 1 15 i 25 

Horse hides, No. 1 3 50 3 75 

Rendered tallow, per lb 05 J 05J 

Pulled wools, super, per lb C 25 

" " eirra ■ 27 

Wool, unwashed fleece 15 

" washed fleece 24 25 

FURS. 

No. 1, Prime 

Raccoon 1 50 

Mink, dark 5 00 6 00 

" pale 2 50 3 50 

Fox, red 1(0 3 50 

" cross 3 00 7 00 

Lynx 5 00 7 00 

Bear, black 1/00 

" cubs an I yearlings 5 00 

Wolf, timber 2 7> 

" prairie 125 

Weasel, white 60 

Badger 150 

Fisher, dark 5 00 6 00 

Skunk, black 1 £0 

" " sh"rt stripe 1 100 

" " long striped 50 

Marten 3 50 20 00 

MiiRkrat., fall 16 

" winter 20 

spr.ng 23 

" western 12 16 

32 



Montreal Metal Markets 

Office of Hardwark and Metal, 
232 McCill Street, 

Montreal, January 11, 1907 

Everywhere, we gel the same report, 
business excellent, with no appearance 

Of a let-up, in the near future, at least. 

Copper remains unchanged with the 
market very firm. 

Ingot tin weakened slightly during 

the week, hut this was presumably only 
a Unci nation, as the metal is again 
hack al its old figures. 

Zinc spelter shows an advance of 25 
cents per 100 pounds over last week's 
quotations. 

Galvanized and black sheets are very 

film. All the makers are so full of or- 
ders, that il will be difficult to get any- 
thing like prompt deliveries next Spring. 

COPPER.— Remains unchanged. Mar- 
ket very firm with an advance in t he 
in .11 future. We quote: Ingot 
copper, 2Gc to 2G|c; sheet copper, base 
sizes. 34c. 

INGOT TIN.— This metal weakened 
slightly during- the week, but is again 
back at the old figures. We still quote: 
46^ to 47c. per pound. 

Z1XO SPELTER.— Shows an advance 
of '-•"> cents per 100 pounds over last 
week's quotations. Our figures now 
are : $7.50 to $7.75 per 100 pounds. 

PIG LEAD. — No change over last 
week's prices. We still quote: $5.50 to 
$5.60 per 100 pounds. 

ANTIMONY— Our price remains 27| 
to '28 cents per pound. 

PIG IRON.— Remains the same. Our 
prices are: Londonderry, $24.50; Carron, 
No. 1. $24.50; Carron. special. $23.50; 
Summerlee. No. 2. selected, $25.00; 
Summerlce. No. 3, soft, $23.50. 

BOILER TURKS.— Still hold at last 
week's advance. We miote: 1J td 2 
inch. $9.50; 2| inch, $10.35; 1\ inch, 
$11.50; 3 inch. $13.00; 3 J inch, $17.00; 
4 inch. $21.50; 5 inch, $45.00. 

TOOL ST HEL— Stocks are moving 
very freely. We quote Colonial 

Black Diamond, 8c. to 9c; Sanderson's, 
8c. to 45c, according to grade; Jes- 
sop's, 13c; Jonas & Colver's, 10c to 
20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per pound; 
Conqueror, 7$c; Conqueror high speed 
steel, 60c; Jowitt's Diamond J., 6£c. 
to 7c; Jowitt's best, lie to ll^c 

MERCHANT STEEL.— Our prices 
are as follows: Sleigh shoe, $2.25; tire, 
$2.40, spring, $2.75; toecalk, $3.05; 
machinery iron finish, - $2.40; reeled 
machinery steel. $2.75; mild, $2.25 base 
alnd upwards; square iharrow teeth 
$2.40; band steel, $2.45 base. Net cash 
30 days, h'ivel steel quoted on appli- 
cation. 

('OLD ROLLED SHAFTING — 
Recent advance still holds good. 
I ' resent prices are: 3-16 inch to 
\ inch, $7.25; 5-16 inch to 11-32 inch, 
$6.20; | inch to 17-32 inch, $5.15; 9-16 
inch to 47-64 inch, $4.45; f inch to 1 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



17-16 inch, $4.10; 11 inch to 3 inch, 
$3.75; 3 J to 3 7-1 (i inch, $3.02; 3J inch 
to 3 15-16 inch, $4.10; 4 inch to 4 7-16 
inch, $4.45; 4* inch to 4 15-16 inch, 
$4.80. Tin's is equivalent to 30 per 
cent, off list. 

GALVANIZED IRON.— Firmness pre- 
vails in the market. We are still quoting 
Queen's Head, 28 gauge, $4.60 to $4.85; 
26 gauge, $4.45; 22 to 24 gauge, $3. 90; 
16 to 20 gauge, $3.75; Apollo, 28 gauge. 
$4.-15 to $4.70; 26 gauge, $4.30; 22 and 
24 gauge, $3.75; 16 and 20 gauge, $3.60; 
Comet, 28 gauge, $4.45 to 
$4.70; 26 gauge, $4.30 to $4.45; 
22 and 24. gauge, $3.75 to $4.00; $16 to 
20 gauge, $3,60 to $3.85; Fleur-de-Lis, 
28 gauge, $4.45 to $4.70; 26 gauge, 
$4.30; 22 and 24 gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 
gauge, $3.60; Gorhals "Best Rest," 
28 gauge, $4.4:"); Colborne Crown, 28 
gauge, $4.45; 26 gauge, $4.30; 24 gauge, 
$3.75. In less than case lots, 25c ex- 
tra. 

OLD MATERIAL— We quote: Heavy 
copper, 19c per lb. ; light copper, 16c 
per 11).; heavy red brass, 161 to 17c per 
lb. ; heavy yellow brass, 14c per lb. ; 
light brass, 10 to 101c per lb.; tea lead. 
4c per lb.; heavy lead, 4 [e per lb.; scrap 
zinc, 4c per lb.; No. 1 wrought, $16.00 
to $17.00 per 100 lbs.: No. 2 wrought, 
$6.00 per 100 lbs.; No. 1 machinery, 
$17.00 per 100 lbs.; stove plate, $13.00 
per Km lbs.; old rubber, 9Jc per lb.; 
mixed rags, 1 to lie per lb. 



Toronto Metal Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto. Jan. 11.1907 

Price changes this week are few, the 
only one to report in sheet, bar or in- 
got metals being a decline of a cent in 
ingot tin. Boiler pitts, however, have 
advanced from 35 to 25 per cent, and 
several advances have been made in old 
material, notably in copper, brass, lead 
and rubber. 

Another important change is an ad- 
vance of 5 per cent, on furnaces and 
registers, a uniform discount of 45 per 
cent now covering furnaces and 70 per 
cent, on registers. Stoves and hot 
water boilers remain unchanged. 

Conditions are similar to those of a 
A\eek ago. Stock taking is interfering 
with business, only a seasonable trade 
being done. Prices remain firm, how- 
ever, with the exception of ingot tin. 

To add spice to the market this week, 
that old story of the United Stair- 
Sled Company establishing a Canadian 
plant at Sandwich has been revived. 
It is said that 1,000 acres has been 
bought, and work will be commenced 
within a week. Most men in touch with 
the metal markets will take these re- 
ports with a grain of sail, however, as 



the advantages or the corporation com- 
ing into the Canadian field are far from 
apparent. They already have a Pair 
chance after structural Btee] business, 
they can ship in tin plate free and the 
British preference on black and galvan- 
ized sheets only amounts to about :i 

per colli, when freight rales are de- 
ducted. Until work on the new plant 
has actually commenced, Canadian pro- 
ducers need no| get excited over the 
possibilit iss i I increased compt tition, 

PIC TRON.— Hamilton, Midland and 
Londonderry are off the market, and 
Radnor is quoted at $33 at furnace. 
Middlesborough is quoted at $24.50, and 
Summerlee, at $26 f.o.b., Toronto. 

BAR IRON.— Bar continues hard to 
gel an. I we still quote: $2.30, f.o.b., To- 
ronto with 2 per cent, discount. 

INGOT TIN.— Weakness has develop 
cd. and we now quote 45 to 4(i cents 
per pound. 

TIN PLATES Market continues ac- 
tive and pi ices linn at recent advances. 

SHEETS AND PLATES.— Apollo; gal- 
vanized sheets have been advanced ten 
cents, and are now quoted at $4.70 for 
10 3-4 ounce. Active buying is reported 
with prices steady. Stocks are light. 

BRASS.— We continue to quote: 271 
cents per pound for sheets. 

COPPER. — Conditions arc unchanged. 
Stocks are low, buyers need supplies, 
and prices are very stiff. We now 
quote: Ingot copper $26 per 100 His., 
and sheet copner $31 to $32 per 100 lbs. 

LEAD — Market is active and prices 
very firm. We quote: $5.40 for imported 
pig and $5.75 to $6.00 for bar lead. 

_ ZINC SPELTER— Stocks continue 
light with market firm and active. We 
qiijoite 7^c. per lb. for foreign and To. 
per lb. for domestic. Sheet zinc is quot- 
ed at 8 l-4c. in casks, and 8 l-2c. in 
part casks. 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES— We 

quote : Plates, per 100 lbs., £ in. to ^ 
in., $2.50; | in., $2.35 heads, per 100 
lbs., $2.75; tank plates, 3-16 in., $2.65; 
tubes, per 100 feet, H in., $8.50; 2, $9; 
2 1-2, $11.30; 3, $12.50; 3 1-2, $16; 4, 
$20.00. Terms, 2 per cent. off. 

ANTIMONY— Market is active, and 
stocks scarce. Prices firm at 27c. to 
28c. 

OLD MATERIAL.— Dealers' buying 
prices still continue as follows: 
Heavy copper and wire. 10 cents, 
per lb.; light copper 17c. per lb.: 
heavy red brass. 17c. per lb.; heavy 
yellow brass, HCc per lb.; light 
brass lie. pel' lb.: tea lead, $3.75 
per 100 lbs.: heavy lead. $4.10 per 100 
lbs., scrap zinc. 4 1 •-> per lb.; iron No. 
1 wrought, $14.00; No. 2 wrought, $6 to 
$8; machinery cast scrap, $16.50 to $18; 
stove plate. $13 to $14. malleable and 
steel, $8; old rubbers, 9ic. per pound; 
country mixed rags, $1 to $1.25 per 100 
lbs., according to quality. 

COAL. — We continue to quote: 
Standard Hocking soft coal f.o.b. at 
mines, lump $1.75, J inch, $1.65, run 

31 



of mine, $1.40, nut, $1.25; N. & S. 
$1.10; P. & S., 85c. 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars, bond- 
ed at bridges; lump, $2.90; } inch, 
$2.(0; mine run, $2.60; slack, $2.25. 



United States Metal Markets 

h'niin I In- lr.,n Age, .Inn In, 1907. 

The monthly pig iron statistics col- 
li'! cd b" The Iron Age show that the 
output of the coke ami anthracite fui- 
naces was 2,236,153 gloss tons in Decern 

is compared with 2,187,665 to 
November. The product ion ol thi 
works furnaces has broken all red 
having reached 1,463,035 tons in Decetn- 
Elowever, tin- outlook for maintain- 
i ig the Decembei outpul during ti ■ 
rent month is not \ en prot sinqe 

,1|( ' papacil 5 oi the furnaces in .operation 
declined from 513,860 tons per wen 
December 1 to 507,397 tons per week on 
• January 1, 1907. 

Scarcity of spot iron is si ill a marked 
feature m all the leading pin iron 
kets, and promises to continue so foi 
some |ime unless weather condition 
verj favorable and transportation I 
ties improve very materially. The ma 
ontv of buyers continue to have a good 
deal of confidence in the second half of 
the year, but it is only fair to 
uiat an increasing number of consumes 
pave determined to await developments 
in view of the high prices prevailing: 
Sellers generally are very linn hut 
there are instances cropping up of in- 
ducements Deng made to book onlers 
foi deliver* during the second half 

In the central west some prettv large 
"ders for foundry iron willprobablj he 
laced a, a? ,,,,, (1<1|( . (h|s lm . 1(l(li 

15,000 tons for a pipe founder and in 000 
ions tor a machmerv manufacturer The 

negotiations for a large tonnage for an 
agricultural implement interest have not 
e come to a head. In the Las. there 
have been some addition,,! large sales of 
bfsic iron at high prices, but "otherwise 
Pig iron consumers are growing con- 
servative as to forward deliveries 

sfrnef,?!"'; ,? uarters specifications for 

st rue tin al shapes arc not coming in fast 
enough to employ the full capacity of 
the mills, thus affording a welcome o P - 
nortunty to divert the steel into other 
channels. The eastern plate makers have 
advanced prices $2 per ton 

A moderate amount of structural work 
has been placed, this including 
tons of bridge work for the New y,„ k 

viil! ral v ,n ? .'i 500 tons f< " the LoSE 

Mile & Nashville road. 

An interesting transaction is the sale 
of a D,000-ton lot of steel bars foi i 
reinforced concrete building for a Chi- 
cago catalogue house. This is the larg- 
est contract for concrete bars vet p] 



From the Iron Trade Review. Jan. 10, 1907. 

While the iron buying movement con- 
tinues extremely heavy in all sections 
*>i' the country, there are indications 
of easier conditions, particularly in the 
east. The Chicago market is still much 
excited, though all the merchant fur- 
naces in that district have sold two- 
thirds of their 1007 make. Southern 
iron is firm with an advancing tendency 
and deliveries very poor. In New York. 
Pittsburg and other eastern centres 
comparatively little iron is being pur- 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



chased, ami com "e reported on 

a large purchase of foundry gxadi 
The supply of foreign iron is increa 

gly scarce, and occasionally foundry- 
men are compelled to close for a tVw 
days at a 111110. It the market is any 
• lc>s Strong ii i> because of the Cact 
that buyers have ordered far in advance 
au.l p>< trthittg tliat is alarming. 

in finished lines easier condi- 
tions also prevail. A number of India- 
na mills in their eagerness for business 

have cut prices on bar iron from >4 to 

per ton below those heretofore pre- 
vailing. Quotations of the larger pro- 
ducer are unchanged. Structural ma- 
terials which so far have constituted 

the only weak factor of the market arc 
in such light demand that the Illinois 
Steel Company now operates its mill 
everv alternate week on billets. To 
counterbalance these facts, however, im- 
provement is noted in a number of linos. 
San Francisco lias finally become an 
important buyer of building materials, 
bavin- placed orders for 7.000 tons 
since January 1. with other large con- 
tracts pending. December sales of the 
American Bridge Company were the 
heaviest of the year with one execu- 
tion, and the sales of the year aggre- 
gated 660.000 tons. Important bridge 
and building contracts are shortly to be 
closed. 

An eastern manufacturer, catering to 
pionmt delivery, has announced an- 
other' advance on plates of $2 per ton. 
making his price $2.10 Pittsburjr, as 
against $1.60 Pittsburg, quoted by the 
leading producer. Sheets arc strong 
and firm by reason of the high price 
of spelter The American Sheet & lm 
Plate Company during the past year 
shipped in the neighborhood of 1.-50.- 
000 tons of sheet products, or 20 per 
cent, more than 1905. 

tern furnace interests, unable to 
secure Lake Superior ore for the corn- 
in- season, have resorted to foreign ore 
for which heaw tonnages have been 
contracted, and will also use local east- 
ern ores. At the close of navigation 
the amount of ore on Lake Erie docks 
was about 200.000 tons less than the. 
corresponding period of 1905. 

London, Eng., Metal Markets 

From Metal Market Report, Jan. 10. 1907. 

Cleveland warrants are quoted at 60s 
M and Glasgow Standard warrants at 
r„;s'. .;d., making price as compared with 
last week Is. 7'.d. lower on Cleveland 
warrants, and Is. Gd. lowei on Glasgow 
Standard warrants. 

TIN —Spot tin opened firm at £190 
li,s 'futures al £191, and after sales of 
320 tons of spot and 900 tons of futures 

Hosed weak at B189 58. tor spot, £189 
15s for futures, making juice compared 
with last week £3 as. lower on spot and 
H,\ 15s. lower on futures. 
COPPER— Spot copper opened steady 
106 5s., futures £107 as., and after 
300 tons of spot and 400 tons of 
futures, closed easy at £106 2s. 6d. for 
spot, and £107 2s. Gd. for futures mak- 
ing price compared with last week 17s. 



Gd. higher on spot and 10s. higher on 

tutu: I 

LEAD— The market closed at £19 las., 
making price as compared with last 
week 3s. lower. 
SPKLTP.K— The market closed .,' 

making price as compared with 
week unchanged. 

N.B. Hardware Trade News 

St. John, Jan. 7. 
Is there to be a time of mark- 
ed industrial development in St. 
John iu the near future ¥ 

The city's growth has been slow of late 
years, comparatively speaking, but there 
have been intimations recently that new 
industries are shortly to come into be- 
ing. Reference was made in the last. 
issue of Hardware and Metal to 
the fact that rumor has had it that 
the Maritime Nail Works concern is 
contemplating the erection here of a 
plant much larger than that it is now 
using. One story has been that the 
talked-of plant was- to be devoted large- 
ly to the manufacture of horse shoe 
nails. Another was that the new works 
were to be of the rolling mill variety. 
Mr. S. E .Elkin. of the Maritime Com- 
pany, has denied the truth of reports. 
How comes the story, on good author- 
ity, that he has secured control of the 
whole of a large stock of land on what 
is known as the Marsh Road ¥ What 
the purpose of this move may be one 
cannot say. Your correspondent has 
been informed, however, that Mr. Elkin 
in seeking a site, is not acting for the 
Maritime Nail Works Company, as 
such, though members of the company 
may be connected with the syndicate 
for which he is carrying on negotia- 
tions. 

Another deal about which there is 
considerable speculation went through a 
few days ago. At that time a lawyer 
secured a Leicester Street property for 
unknown persona. This move, it is 
generally believed, is taken with a view 
to establishing a manaufacturing in- 
dustry. 

A New Brunswick company that is 
apparently prospering is the New 
Brunswick Wire Fence Company, Lim- 
ited. At their recent annual meeting 
the directors of the company received 
excellent reports showing a remark-able 
growth in business during 1906. Very 
shortly a new wire weaving machine is 
to he installed in the company's works. 
A. large annex for warehouse purposes 
is now being built. Other additional 
warehouse space and more new machin- 
ery, will probably be necessary ere 
long. The directors Cor 1007 are: Dr. 
C. A. Murray, Hon, G. W. Robinson, 
A. C. Chapman. F. W. Givan and J. 
T. JlawLe, all of Moiicton. They have 
elected Dr. Murray president, Mr. Gi- 
van vice-president, and Mr. Chapman, 
secretary and manager. 

It is the same old story asa regards 
prices, firmness and a tendency to Cur 
tin i increase. Ingot tin is at a record 
making figure; wire and cut nails have 

34 



taken another jump upwards; brass is 

quoted at a stronger figure; lead is 
still at an exceptionally high figure. 

There is D.0 need to go On. 'the gen- 
eral statement is sufficient, prices are 
Continuing at remarkable positions. 
Not Cor years has there been such a 
condition of affairs. In some quarters 
the opinion prevails that a general re- 
vision of prices is soon to come here as 
elsewhere. 

The effect of the new tariff on the 
cordage business is not looked forward 
to with any degree of complacency by 
the dealers. The ruling has made the 
conditions surrounding this branch of 
trade decidedly uncertain. The free 
admission of ropes for fishing purposes 
makes a condition of unsettledness, and 
opens the way for a variety of difficul- 
ties. Then, too, the question comes up: 
will the new regulations give the Unit- 
ed States cordage people too great an 
advantage? 

George McAvity is one of the incor- 
porators ef the Dominion Car and 
Foundry Company, Montreal. 



N.S. Hardware Trade News 

Halifax, N.S., Jan. 8, 1907. 

The hardware trade is very quiet at 
present. All the jobbers are now busily 
engaged in taking stock and it will be 
some time before they get things 
straightened out again. The weather 
is very unseasonable, and has a 
.strong (tendency to injure business. 
There is no snow in the woods, and 
the lumbering business is practically 
at a standstill. What promised to be 
a busy season at the outset, has re- 
ceived a serious set back by the weather 
conditions, and the outlook is not very 
hopeful. The prices of all lines are 
very firm, more particularly so with 
metals, which have an upward tenden- 
cy. Ingot tin and tin plates are 
higher now than they have been for 
some time, and quotations on Paris green 
are fully 30 per cent, higher than at 
the same time last year. White lead 
and all wire products have been advan- 
ced by the manufacturers, and it is ex- 
pected that nails will go still higher, 
/inc. has been advanced nine cents per 
cask. 

The poor condition of the ice since 
the opening of the New Year, has 
caused a marked falling off in the sales 
i f skates, and there is little Or no cic- 
mand for horse shoers' supplies, the 
streets and roads being entirely free 
from ice. All the big industries of the 
province seem to have large orders on 
hand, and the relighting of the Nova 
Scotia Steel Company's blast furnaces 
at Sydney Mines will have good re- 
sults. 

James Simmonds &■ Co. 's hardware 
store at Dartmouth, N.S.. was damag- 
ed by fire last week and the stock was 
damaged to the extent of $2,574 from 
water. The members of the firm are 
very energetic, however, and business 
is rapidly expanding. The fire did not 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



interfere to any extent with the busi- 
ness, ,us they made prompt arrange 
ments to fill all the orders on hand. 

Calgary Hardware Trade News 

Calgary, January .">, l!)07. 
Dealers here all report a brisk Christ- 
mas hade. Local stores made good 

displays of seasonable stock and 
reaped the advantage. Special men- 
tion may be made of Messrs. Ashdown's 
display of cutlery and table plate, 
which by its magnificence suggested a 
jewellers store. 

The building trade continues busy 
here, and the demand for the various 
supplies is consequently brisk. First 
in importance as regards size and cost, 
among the jobs under way, is the new 
Normal School. The British Columbia 
Geheral Contract Company, who have 
the contract for the school have just 
completed a large extension of the C. 
P.R.'s local machine shop. Built sub- 
stantially of stone alid internally ar- 
ranged iu accordance with the latest 
designs of the company's engineers, 
the enlarged shops should enable the 
daily increasing work to be handled 
more expeditiously. 

Messrs. MacFarlan & Northcott are 
rapidly getting their new store into 
shape for business. Unlike the other 
hardware stores in the city which are 
all within a radius of a few hundred 
yards east, their new premises are sit- 
uated on Eighth Avenue West. With 
a double window frontage, the inter- 
ior shows a commodious space for the 
convenient storage of retail articles, 
while back premises give accommoda- 
tion for the heavier branches of the 
trade. Messrs. MacFarlan and North- 
cott are also agents for the MaeLaugh- 
lin carriages. 

The reconstruction of the big cement 
plant in the east of the city is being 
rapidly pushed on. Mr. Butchart re- 
ports the work as nearly completed, but 
complains of the shortage of labor. 

London Hardware Trade News 

The elaborate preparations made by 
the Commercial Travellers' Club of 
London, for the ball on the 11th inst., 
gave some indication that the event 
would be the most, successful in the 
history of the club. Every season this 
affair is looked upon as one of the 
greatest events in the city's social life, 
and this season was no exception. The 
subscription list was closed more than 
a week in advance, when an attendance 
of about 500 was assured. By a 
specially constructed passage way from 
the second story of the City Hall to 
the second story of the Masonic Tem- 
ple, the two buildings were as one, 
practically, for the occasion. The dec- 
orations of the City Hall gave the sug- 
gestion of a big marquee and the same 
idea was carried out in the decoration 
of the banqueting hall in the Masonic 
Temple. Red and black — the club col- 
ors — were generously used in the deoor- 



ating, Th,' officers of the Club are: 
Son. C s. flyman, Bon.-Pres.; II. i: 

Buttrey and Donald Ferguson, Hon. 
Yice-Pres.; ('. \Y. McGuire, President; 
J. A. Townsend ami George Detlor, Vice 
Presidents; J. J. Darkness. A. II. I'.nn 
er, L. C. Johnston, D. W. Lind, A. II. 
Moran, J. M. Ferguson. T. \V. Edwardj 
and F. S. Fisher, members of the In- 
centive Committee. The gentlemen who 
had in charge the arrangements for the 
ball were: F. S. Fisher, Honorary 
Chairman; H. W. Lind, Honorary Sec- 
retary; S. F. Glass, convenor, Accom- 
modation and IIall» Committee; J. M. 
Ferguson, convenor, Reception Commit- 
tee; J. A. Calling, convenor, Refresh- 
ment Committee: H. C. McBride, con- 
vener, Printing Committee; J. A. Town- 
send, convener, Finance Committee; A. 
Tillmann, convenor Decoration Com- 
mittee, and J. J. Harkness, convener 
Music Committee. To these be the" 
credit. 



CONFERENCE OF TRAVELERS. 

About forty managers of branches 
and traveling salesmen, representing 
the Canadian Fairbanks Company 
throughout Canada, have been in con- 
ference in Toronto during the past 
week, their programme being very in- 
structive to all who participated, in- 
eluding both addresses by men who had 
been successful in. manufacturing and 
selling the Fairbanks lines, and visits 
to several of the factories where the 
Fairbank specialties are produced. 

Monday was devoted to a discussion 
of the merits and best selling methods 
of scales, gas engines, steam specialties, 
and railway supplies. On Tuesday gas 
engines and . transmission materials 
were taken up; a visit to the Canadian 
Fairbanks-Morse factory being also in- 
cluded. On Wednesday the delega- 
tion visited Hamilton and Dundas, to 
make an inspection or the methods of 
manufacture in operation in the John 
Bertram Machine Works at Dundas; 
the Pratt & Whitney Small Tool Fac- 
tory at Dundas, and the Union Drawn 
Steel Co.'s works at Hamilton. Thurs- 
day was devoted to valves and steam 
specialties, a theatre party being given 
in the evening; and on Friday another 
trip was made to the Fairbanks-Morse 
factory and a general recapitulation 
made of the results of the week's 
°tudies. 

H. J. Fuller, president of the Can- 
adian Fairbanks Company, is an ar- 
dent advocate of conferences of selling 
staffs, believing that they do much to 
make the different individuals realize 
the power of concerted action as well 
as teaching the new men that it is 
their business not only to take orders, 
but to sell goods ami know the articles 
they sell. Mr. Fuller is also a srreat be- 
liever in the "made in Canada" slogan, 
ami is steadily increasing the number 
of Fairbanks lines made in this coun- 
try. 

Two important announcements can 
be made this week — one being 

35 



that the scales and valves ;it pri 

made by the E. T. Fairbanks Com 
pany at their faetorj at St. Johnsbury, 
Vermont, will, in future, be made for 
the Canadian trade at a new factory 
ibeing established at Beebe Plains, 
Quebec, only in miles from the pareut 
factory in Vermont. The other an 

nouiiceinent i.s that the Canadian fan 

hanks Company have contracted with 
the K. McDougal] Co. to take over tin: 
entiie product of their smaller machine 
tools, the contract extending for a pel 

iod of 5 years. The Hail I'nioii (',,., 
of Providence, R.I., also intend to 
tablish a new factory at Toronto. Tie 
Fairbanks-Morse gas engines are al 
present made in Toronto; pumps up to 
(i inches are also made in Toronto, the- 
iarger sizes being imported, and wood 
pulleys are made at the Montreal fac 
tory. These lines, as well as those 
made !in Hamilton 'and Dundas, are 
only a few of those sold by the Fair- 
banks representatives. 

Those persons at the conference in- 
cluded: — 

Montreal — II. J. Fuller, I). Cult ridge, 
Gerald Robinson, G. B. Green, J. Kalis. 
R. Miquelon, B. J. Corry, J. S. Bowar, 
\Y S. Howe, J. McLeod, E. J. Holland. 
G. Drinkwater, M, P. Shea, T. E. By- 
der, H. L. De Wolfe. 

Toronto— C. J. Brittain, C. S. Hook, 
F. M. Allen, F. J. Campbell, J. G. 
Robinson, Geo. Robson, YV. J. Sander 
son, S. B. Trainer, Geo. Fisher, E. I>, 
Hamilton, P. C. Brooks. J. S. Sanson. 

Winnipeg — J. II. Crane, (i. K. 
Tower, P. D. McLaren. A. H. Johnston, 
S. Jolliff. 

Vancouver — G. H. Howard, If. »M. 
Kalberg, F. W. Fisher. 

St. John — G. E. Choinier. 

Halifax— K. N. Forbes. 

New Glasgow — F. A. Lytle. 

Chicago — Mr. Jenson. 

An important addition to the .Mon- 
treal sta| is W. S. Howe, who has just 
resigned his position as advertising 
manager of the S. A. Woods Co., of 
Boston, manufacturers of wood-work- 
ing machinery. Mr. Howe has made a 
splendid reputation for himself in the 
Eastern States, and should make his 
way with the company he is now as- 
sociated with. 



MONTREAL FIRM INCORPORATED. 

The firm of A. C. Leslie & Company 
has recently been incorporated under the 
name of A. C. Leslie & Co., with an 
authorized capital of $250,000. 

This business, which was established 
by the late A. C. Leslie in 1866, is now 
one of the oldest in the iron, steel and 
metal trade in the Dominion, and i he- 
rapid growth of its business, combined 
with the desire to give some of their 
employes an interest in the business, 
has led to its incorporation 

No change whatever has i ecu i ade in 
the personnel of the management, the 
directors and officers being as follows : 
William S. Leslie, presidenl ■ Alb -rt II. 
Campbell, vice-president; Thomas II. 
Jordan, director; Edward H. ; 'o»l r.d, 
secretary ; Frederick H. Foster, treas- 
urer. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 







Blanchite 



Now Made in Canada 



HENCEFORTH LOOK FOR THIS LABEL 



■=»/vJJ>! 







THE BLANCHITE PROCESS PAINT CO-lim.ted. 

TORONTO.CANADA. 



Absolutely 
the Best 



We Will Prove It 



I 



86 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Blanchite 

Blanchite Paint Products First Greet the 
Canadian Trade in 190? 

(1) We are a Purely Canadian Company 

including many of the best known business men in Canada, who have purchased 
valuable rights. 

(2) We Manufacture Under a New Process 

which does away with the harmful materials paint-makers have tried to eliminate 
for years. 

(3) We Do Not Introduce An Experiment 

Blanchite has been on the American and European markets and won large contracts 
right in the greatest centres of competition — London, Eng., and New York, U.S.A. — 
against all paints made in both countries. When Blanchite won the immense contract 
for the /VeiV York Subway, 95 paint samples Were tested in the chemical labora- 
tories of the Rapid Transit Commission, and also received a 10 months' practical time 
test under hardest conditions. This page will not hold list of references, which includes 
some of the largest corporations in the wo rid. 

(4) We Use Finest Machinery and Purest Raw Material 

and we do not adulterate. 

(5) We Know Our Goods — You Will Know Them Soon 

Do not leave your opportunity to your competitor. 

We Can Challenge Comparison 



With best wishes for New Year, 

Yours very truly, 



BLANCHITE PROCESS PAINT CO., LIMITED 



Offices and Factory : 785 King St. W. 



TORONTO, 



CANADA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



There is 
Twenty Years 
of Experience 
in this Can ' 




Doesn't this point the 
way for you ? Stephen's 
Pure Paint has now a 
proven record of over 
twenty years' hard use, 
under many difficult con- 
ditions. 

Every gallon is made 
with Manitoba Linseed 
Oil — properly aged — this 
increases not only the 
body, but also the wear- 
ing qualities of the paint. 

Our extensive Adver- 
tising creates the demand 
Will you supply it in your 
territory '.' 

Write for our special 
plan, tells how " We help 
you sell." 

G.F. Stephens & Co. 



PAINT AND COLOR DEALERS 



Limited 



WINNIPEG, 



CANADA 



MANITOBA HARDWARE AND METAL MARKETS 

(Market quotations corrected by telegraph up to 12 a.m. Friday, Jan. 4, 1907.) 

Boom 611, Union Hunk Building, Office of Hardware and Metal, Winnipeg, Man. 



There was no change in prices in 

the li. ml ware and metal trades this 
week with the holiday season just 
ended business is comparatively slack 
and will continue to be so for a week 
or two. Quotations this week are an- 
changed from the previous week. The 
trade here looks for a decide. 1 activity 
in business as soon as building opera- 
tions are under way. Already in Win- 
nipeg there have been several building' 
permits for the coming year taken out 
and activity in building circles promises 
to be as pronounced, if not more so, 
than during the past year when the re- 
cord was reached here. 

LANTERNS. — Quotations are tas 
follows: Cold blast, per dozen, $6.50; 
coppered cold blast, per dozen, $8.50; 
cold blast dash, per dozen, $8.50. 

WIRE— We quote as follows : Barbed 
wire, 100 lbs., $2.90 ; plain galvanized, 
6 to 8, $3.39 ; 10, $3.50 ; 12, $3.10 ; 13 
$3.20 ; 14, $3.90 ; 15, $4.45 ; 16, $4.60; 
plain twist, $3 ; staples, $3.50 ; oiled 
annealed wire, 10, $2.96 ; 11, $3.02 ; 12, 
S.-5.10 ; 13, $3.20; 14, $3.30; 15, $3.45. 
Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

HORSESHOES — Quotations are as 
follows : Iron, No. to No. 1, $4.65 ; 
No. 2 and larger, $4.40 ; snowshoes, No. 
to No. 1, $4.90 ; No. 2 and larger, 
$4.65 ; steel, No. to No. 1, $5 ; No. 2 
and larger, $4.75. 

HORSENAILS — Lists and discounts 
are quoted as follows : No. 10, 20c. ; 
No. 9, 22c. ; No. 8, 24c. ; No. 7, 26c. ; 
No. 6, 28c. ; No. 5, 32c. ; No. 4, 40c, 
per pound. Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows : "C" brand, 40, 10 and 74 per 
cent., "M" brand and other brands, 55 
and 60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

WIRE NAILS.— Quoted now at $2.70 
per keg. 

CUT NAILS.— As noted last week 
cut nails have been advanced to $2.90 
per keg. 

PRESSED SPIKES — Prices are 
quoted as follows since the recent ad- 
vance: 1x5 and 6, $4.75; 5-6 
x 5, 6 and 7, $4.40; I x 6, 7 and 8, 
$4 25; 7-16 x 7 and 9, $4.15: 4x8, 9., 10 
and 12. $4.05; £ x 10 and 12, $3.90. All 
other lengths 25c. extra net. 

SCREWS— Discounts are as follows : 
Flat head, iron, bright, 85 and 10 p.c. ; 
round head, iron, 80 p.c. ; flat head, 
brass, 75 and 10 p.c. ; round head, brass 
70 and 10 p.c. ; coach, 70 p.c. 

NUTS AND BOLTS — Discounts are 
unchanged and continue as follows : 
Bolts, carriage, # or smaller, 60 and 5 ; 
bolts, carriage, 7-16 and up, 55 ; bolts, 
machine, J and under, 55 and 5 ; bolts, 
machine, 7-16 and over, 55 ; bolts, tire, 
65 ; bolt ends, 55 ; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 
and 10 ; machine screws, 70 ; plough 
bolts, 55 ; square nuts, case lots, 3 ; 
square nuts, small lots, 2£ ; hex nuts, 
case lots, 3 ; hex nuts, smaller lots, 
2£ p.c. 

RIVETS— Discounts are quoted as fol- 

38 



lows since the recent advance in the 
pric4j of copper rivets: Iron, discounts, 
60 ajjid 10 p.c; copper, No. 8, 37c; cop- 
per, No. 10, 40c; copper, No. 12, 43c. 

COIL CHAIN.— Prices have been re- 
vised the general effect being an ad- 
vance. Quotations now are: i inch 
$7.00; 5-16, $5.36;%, $4.-75; 7-16, $4.50; 
i, $4.25; 9-16, $4.20; f, $4.25; f, $4.10. 

SHOVELS— Discounts on spades and 
shovels continue 40 and 5 p.c. 

HARVEST TOOLS — Discounts con- 
tinue as before, 60 and 5 per cent. 

AXE HANDLES— Quoted as follows : 
Turned, s.g. hickory, doz., $3.15 ; No. 1, 
$1.90 ; No. 2, $1.60 ; octagon, extra, 
$2.30 ; No. 1, $1.60. 

AXES. — Quotations are: Bench axes, 
40; broad axes, 25 p.c. dis. off list; Roy- 
al Oak, per dozen, $6.25; Maple Leaf, 
$8.25 ; Model, $c\50 ; Black Prince, 
$7.25 ; Black Diamond, $9.25 ; Standard 
flint edge, $8.75 ; Copper King, $8.25 ; 
Columbian, $9.50 ; bandied axes, North 
Star, $7.75 ; Black Prince, $9.25 ; Stan- 
dard flint edge, $10.75 ; Copper King, 
$11 per dozen. 

BUTTS— The discount on wrought iron 
butts is 70 p.c. 

CHURNS — The discounts from list 
continue as before : 45 and 5 per cent. ; 
but the list has been advanced and is 
now as follows : No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; 
No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, $11 ; No. 4, $13 ; 
No. 5, $16. 

CHISELS— Quoted at 70 p.c. off list 
prices. 

AUGER BITS— Discount on "Irwin" 
bits is 47i per cent., and on other lines 
70 per cent. 

BLOCKS— Discount on steel blocks is 
35 p.c. off list prices ; on wood, 55 p.c. 

FITTINGS— Discounts continue as fol- 
lows : Wrought couplings, 60 ; nipples, 
65 and 10 ; T's and elbows, 10 ; malle- 
able bushings, 50 ; malleable unions, 55 
p.c. 

GRINDSTONES— As noted last week, 
the price is now l£c. per lb., a decline 
of Jc. 

FORK HANDLES— The discount is 40 
p.c. from list prices. 

HINGES— The discount on light "T" 
and strap hinges is 65 p.c. off list 
prices. 

HOOKS — Prices are quoted as follows: 
Brush hooks, heavy, per doz., $8.75 ; 
grass hooks, $1.70. 

CLEVISES— Price is now 6£c per lb. 

STOVE PIPES— Quotations are as 
follows : 6-inch, per 100 feet length, 
$9 ; 7-inch, $9.75. 

DRAW KNIVES— The discount is 70 
per cent, from list prices. 

RULES— Discount is 50 per cent. 

WASHERS— On small quantities the 
discount is 35 p.c. ; on full boxes it is 
40 p.c. 

WRINGERS — Prices have been ad- 
vanced $2 per dozen, and quotations are 
now as follows : Royal Canadian, 
$35.00; B.B., $39.75, per dozen. 

P^ILES — Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows : Arcade, 75 ; Black Diamond, 60 ; 
Nicholson's, 62£ p.c. 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



THE 



Winnipeg Paint «* Glass C 



Limited 



Warehouses 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



WINNIPEG 



Our sample books of BAS-KA-INO — (something new in 
wall hangings — standard colors) and L1IN-UNA (a high-class 
colored tapestry burlap — all colors), sized and oil-coated bur- 
laps will be out in a few days. We would like to mail you 
one of these. Send us your orders. 



•) 



Good Ceilings a Good Investment 




One of our Embossed Metal Ceilings. 

This is house-cleaning time in the hardware store. Why not seize the oppor- 
tunity to replace your old unsightly plaster ceiling with one of embossed metal, which 
will put an end to your ceiling worry ? These ceilings require no attention after 
once being applied. There will be no peeling of whitewash or dropping of plaster, 
and they give a tone to your store otherwise unobtainable. Your neighbors will want 
metal ceilings, too, and that will mean business for you. 

Write us for quotations. 

The Metal Shingle & Siding Co., Limited, Preston, Ont. 



BUILDING PAPER — Prices are as 
Tollows : Plain, Joliette, 40c. ; Cyclone, 
55c. ; Anchor, 55c. ; pure fibre, 60c. ; 
tarred, Joliette, 65c. ; Cyclone, 80c. ; 
Anchor, 65c. ; pure fibre, 80c. 

TINWARE, ETC.— Quoted as follows: 
Pressed, retinned, 70 and 10 ; pressed, 
plain, 75 and 2£ ; pieced, 30 ; japanned 
ware, 37£ ; enamelled ware, Famous, 
50 ; Imperial, 50 and 10 ; Imperial, one 
coat, 60 ; Premier, 50 ; Colonial, 50 
and 10 ; Royal, 60 ; Victoria, 45 ; white 
45 ; Diamond, 50 ; Granite, 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED WAEE. — The dis- 
count on pail is now 37J per cent.; 



and on other galvanized lines the dis- 
count is 30 per cc>nt. 

CORDAGE— We quote: Rope, sisal, 7- 
16 and larger, basis, $11.25; Manila, 7-16 
and larger, basis, $16.25 ; Lathyarn, 
$11.25 ; cotton rope, per lb., 21c. 

SOLDER— Quoted at 27c. per pound. 
Block tin is quoted at 45c. per pound. 

VISES — Prices are quoted as fol- 
lows : "Peter Wright," 30 to 34, 14ic; 
35 to 39, 14c; 48 and larger, 13*c. per 
lb. 

ANVILS— "Peter Wright" anvils are 
selling at lie. per lb. 
39 




953 



SUPERB EMPIRE 

The Perfect Cooker 

We draw the attention of the Western Trade to the 
Superb Empire Planished Steel Range. The oven 
door is not only braced but also spring balanced. A 
lever is attached to the front key-plate to raise it as de- 
sired, and contrived also to hold it up if necessary. The 
Superb throughout is substantial, its nickel dress alone 
making it a ready seller, besides, it is made by a West 
ern stove factory for Western people only. 

The Western Stove Makers 

S^MANUFACTURCRSOf^^; 



DAVID REID & CO. 

Hardware Commission Merchants 

Room 22 Stanley Block, - Winnipeg, Man, 



Correspondence is solicited from 
manufacturers wishing a represen- 
tative in Winnipeg and the North 
West. 



We ha«t sub-agents 
throughout Western Canada 



BEST OF REFERENCES 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



(KOWBARS— Quoted now at 4c. per 
lb. 

POWER HORSE CLIPPERS — The 
"1902" power horse clipper is selling 
at $12, and the 'Twentieth Century" 
at $6. The "1904" sheep shearing ma- 
chines are sol 1 at $13.60. 

AMMUNITION, K TC.— Quotations are 
as follows: Cartridges, Dominion R.F. 
50 and 5 ; Dominion, C.F., 33$ 
C.F., pistol, p.c; C.F., mili- 

tary, 10 p.c. advance. Loaded 
shells : Dominion Elev's and Kvnoch's 
soft, 12 gauge, black, $16.50; chilled, 12 
gauge. $17.50; soft, 10 gauge, $19.50; 
chilled. 10 gauge, $20.50. Shot, ordin- 
ary, per 100 lbs., $7.25; chilled, $7.75; 
powder. P.F., keg, Hamilton, ' $4.75 ; 
F.F.G.. Dupont's. $5. 

IRON AND STEEL.— Quotations are: 
Bar iron basis, $2.70. Swedish 
iron basis, $4.95; sleigh shoe steel, 
$2.75 ; spring steel, $3.25 ; machinery 
steel, $3.50 ; tool steel, Black Diamond, 
100 lbs., $9.50 ; Jessop. $13. 

SHEET ZINC — The price is now 
$8.50 for cask lots, and $9 for broken 
lots. 

PIG LEAD— Quoted a $5.85 per cwt. 

AXLE GREASE— "Mica" axle grease 
is quoted at $2.75 per case, and "Dia- 
mond" at $1.60. 

IRON PIPE AND FITTINGS— Re- 
vised prices are as follows: — Black pipe, 
i/ 4 inch, $2.65; %, $2.80; y 2 , $3.50; %, 
$4.40; 1. $6.35; iy 4 , $8.65; V/ 2 , $10.40; 
2, 13.85; 2i/ 2 , $19.00; 3, $25.00. Galr 
vanized iron pipe, % inch. $3.75; y$, 
$4.35; %, $5.65; 1, $8.10; iy 4 , $11.00; 
iy 2 ,. $13.25; 2, inch, $17.65. Nipples, 
discounts 70 and 10 per cent. ; Unions, 
couplings, bushings and plugs, 60 per 
cent. 

LEAD PIPE— The price, $7.80, is 
firmly maintained in view of the ad- 
vancing lead market. 

GALVANIZED IRON— Quoted as 
follows :— Apollo, 16 gauge, $3.90 ; 
18 and 20, $4.10 ; 22 and 24, 
$4.45; 26, $4.40; 28, $4.65, 30 gauge or 
1034 oz.; $4.95; Queen's Head, 24, $4.50; 
26, $4.65; 28, $5.00. 

TIN PLATES— We now quote as fol- 
lows : IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box, $9.50; 
IX charcoal, 20 x 28, $ia.50; XXI char- 
coal, 20 x 28, $13.50. 

TERNE PLATES— Quoted at $9. 

CANADA PLATES— Quoted as fol- 
lows: Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24, 
$3.40; 20 x 28, $3.65; full polished, $4.15. 

BLACK SHEETS— Prices are : 10 to 
16 gauge, 100 lbs., $3.50; 18 to 22, 
$3.75; 24, $3.90; 26, $4; 28, $4.10. 

PETROLEUM AND GASOLINE.— 
Silver Star in brls. per gal., 20c; Sun- 
light in brls, per gal., 21c; per case, 
$2.30; Eocene in brls, per gal., 23c; per 
ease, $2.50; Pennoline in brls., per gal., 
24c; Crystal Spray, 23c; Silver Light, 
21c; Engine gasoline in barrels, per 
gal., 28c, f.o.b. Winnipeg in cases, $2.75 

PAINTS, OILS & TURPENTINE — 
Turpentine is firm at the recent advance 
White lead, pure, $7; bladder putty in 
barrels, 2Jc; in kegs, 3fc; turpentine, 
barrel lots, Winnipeg, $1.01; Calgary, 
$1.08; Lethbridge, $1.08; Edmon- 
ton, $1.09. Less than barrel lots 
5c per gallon advance. Linseed oil, 
raw, Winnipeg, 64c; Calgary, 71c; 



Lethbridge, 71c; Edmonton, 72cj boiled 
oil, 3c per gal. advance on these prices. 
WINDOW GLASS-We quote : 16-oz. 
O.G., single, in 50-ft. boxes — 16 to 25 
united inches, $2.25; 26 to 40, $2.40; 
l(i-oz. O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases — 
lfi to 25 united inches. $4; 26 to 40, 
$4.52; 41 to 50, $4.75; 50 to 60, $5.25; 
CI to 70, $5.75. 21-oz. C.S., double, in 
100-ft. cases — 26 to 40 united inches, 
$7.35; 41 to 50, $8.40; 51 to 60. $9.45; 
61 to 70, $10.50; 71 to 80, $11.55; 81 to 
85, $12.60; 86 to 90. $14.75; 91 to 95. 
$17.30. 



PROMINENT MANUFACTURER 
DEAD. 

Hardwaremen throughout Canada 
will regret to learn of the rather sudden 
death a week ago of Leonard McGlash- 
an. of Niagara Falls. With a party of 
relatives and friends he had gone to 
California a month ago to enjoy the 
milder winter climate of the Pacific 
coast, but on his arrival there was 
taken ill with typhoid fever, the disease 




THE LATE LEONARD McGLASHAN. 

which caused his death. Mr. McGlash- 
an was 61 years of age and besides a 
widow, leaves a daughter and one son, 
L. Lee McGlashan, of the McGlashan- 
Clarke company, Niagara Falls, manu- 
facturers of cutlery and silverware. 

Mr. McGlashan was probably the 
wealthiest citizen of Niagara Falls and 
was one of the first users of power from 
Niagara River, besides being interested 
in many enterprises, including mines and 
railways in the southwestern states and 
Mexico, and was a large real estate 
owner. He was until recently the chief 
owner of the Ontario Silver Company, 
which had a large factory at Thorold, 
then at Humberstone and finally located 
in Niagara Falls, where it is an import- 
ant industry. Mr. McGlashan sold out his 
interest to the International Silver 
Company some time ago, and since then 
the McGlashan-Clarke Company was 
formed and built the large works at 
Niagara Falls, which commenced opera- 
tions only a month or so ago. 

40 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS 

When sending catalogues for review, manu- 
facturers would confer a favor by pointing out 
the new articles that they contain. It would 
assist the editor in writing the review. 

By mentioning Hardware and Mktal to 
•how that the writer is in tliti trade, a copy of these 
catalogues or other printed matter will be sent by 
the firms whose addresses are given. 



A Novel New Year's Card. 

We have received from Ludger G ra- 
vel, Montreal, a New Year's greeting in 
the form of an aluminum post card 
showing a photograph of the sender, and 
Christmas and New Year's greetings in 
French and English. 



Chrysanthemums. 

The Guelph Stove Company have is- 
sued a beautiful calendar, it being a re- 
production of "Chrysanthemums," a 
painting by an eminent French artist. 
The calendar is well worth sending for. 



Desk Calendar. 

The D. Moore Company, stove manu- 
facturers, of Hamilton, have issued to 
the trade a very small compact desk- 
calendar, with a cut of their works, 
which will be found very acceptable by 
all who receive a copy. 



Cordage Calendar. 

The Independent Cordage Co., of To- 
ronto, have issued a beautiful calendar 
for 1907, which will be well received by 
the trade, and any person not yet re- 
ceiving one should write mentioning this 
paper. 

A Quebec Calendar. 

J. McOuat & Son, hardware mer- 
chants, Lachute, Que., have supplied 
their customers with a very attractive 
calendar for 1907, a copy of which has 
been received by Hardware and Metal. 



Capewell Horse Nail. 

The Capewell Horse Nail Co. have is- 
sued a very nice calendar. Also a lit- 
tle booklet, containing history of this 
nail. Also cuts of various style, heads, 
and sizes. Quite a number of letters 
from various horsc-shoers throughout 
the country have been received claiming 
the superior qualities of this nail. 



The Metric System. 

Lord Kelvin's views on the advantage 
of the metric system has just been pub- 
lished by the Decimal Association, 605 
Salisbury House, London, E.C., and can 
be procured for the sum of 3d. from 
these publishers. The book goes exten- 
sively into the explanation of the met- 
ric system, also verious uses which it 
is put to. 



A Want Book. 

The Dominion Wire Mfg. Co., of Mon- 
trea,, have issued a "Memo" book for 
1907, which is bound in a neat black 
leather cover, with the company's trade 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



mark on t lie cover, and contains useful 

information, which will come in handy 

to any merchant dealing in wire. Copies 

may be obtained from the company's 

salesmen by mentioning E-Iardware and 
Metal. 



Fairbanks' Calendar. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Company, of 
Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg, and Van- 
couver, manufacturers of valves, pipe, 
and fittings, etc., are Sending to the 
trade a large 1907 calendar, with month- 
ly sheets, containing cuts of different 
lines manufactured by them. This cal- 
endar should prove very useful for store 
or office use, as the large print makes 
it very plain and easily read. It will 
be sent free on request of anyone men- 
tioning this paper. 



Year Book for 1907. 

Wilkinson- Heywood and Clark, paint 
manufacturers, Montreal, have issued a 
very useful little pocket diary and cash 
account book. 

The book is about 3ixG inches, is 
bound in a handsome red leather cover 
with a pocket at the back containing a 
pencil ; it also contains much informa- 
tion of value to paint dealers. 

This book is entirely free from adver- 
tising matter, with the exception of ihe 
firm name, which appears at the top of 
several of the pages. 

This useful little souvenir will, while 
the supply lasts, be sent by the above 
firm to any authorized paint dealer who 
will mention Hardware and Metal in 
writing. 



Ice Cream Freezers. 

North Bros. Manufacturing Co., of 
Philadelphia, have just issued their 1907 
catalogue, containing cuts of various 
lines of freezers made by them. A new 
feature is the twin freezer, which they 
have just placed on the market. This 
freezer is adapted for the making of two 
different ilavors at one time. The can 
is divided into two partitions, which 
project above the top of the can and 
hears against the can lid, so that dur- 
ing freezing nothing can pass from one 
side to the other. The dasher has a cen- 
tral shaft which fits in the groove of 
the partition of the can. This dasher 
carried two sets of scrapers, one set 
filling in one side of the can and the 
other set in opposite side. The motion 
is not the same as the other models on 
account of the partition in can. It is 
therefore swung forward and backward, 
having a rotary motion, the motion be- 
ing much handier than the old. 



Art Metal Work. 

The Gait Art Metal Company have 
issued three fully illustrated catalogues 
of products manufactured by them. Their 
Catalogue A. is about 8x12 inches, con- 
taining 56 pages, dealing particularly 
with different designs of ceilings, borders 
and corners of many kinds. Catalogue 

B. deals with roofing and siding, also 
going extensively into the correct 
methods of laying this roofing, while 
cuts of their rock, brick and corrugated 
siding are also displayed. Catalogue 

C. contains many illustrations of cor- 




VVestern Canada Factory, 797 Notre Dame Ave., Winnipeg, Man. 



nices, skylights, finials, ventilators, 
window caps, etc., with full instructions 
as to ordering these goods, measure- 
ments, etc. Any dealer who has not 
yet received these catalogues should 
write and procure them at once in pre- 
paration for the coming building season. 



Starr Skate Book. 

The Starr Manufacturing Company are 
sending to the trade their Skate Book, 
which contains illustrations of various 
grades manufactured by them, , s well 
as valuable information, as to the best 
methods of placing skates on the boots. 
The better known lines they manufacture 
are the Acme (with and without ankle 
supports), Regal, Mic-Mac "Starr" and 
Chebueto hockey, Starr tube, ladies' 
and gentlemen's, Beaver, Starr tube rac- 
er, and Starr racer. A new hockey 
skate has been put on the market known 
as the "Yelox," combining all the good 
features of the other brands. This skate 
is meeting with a very large sale. The 
Starr Company also manufacture hoc- 

41 



key sticks, and have just placed on the 
market two new models, witli double- 
grooved serrated blade, which adds 
greatly to the shooting qualities, and 
strength of the stick. In the back of 
this catalogue will be found the rui 
hockey and a table giving comparative 
sizes of shoes and skates. 



LEWIS BROS.' BANQUET. 

The travelers of Lewis Bros, staff 
had their annual re-union on Wednes- 
day, Thursday and Friday of last week. 

At the meeting which was held on 
Thursday. Dee. 27, 1906, short addresses 
were delivered by Messrs. -la-. <!. Lewis, 
('. M. Strange and C. F. Smallpiei 

The banquet at the Engineers' Club 
on Friday evening, I' 28, L906, was 
a great success. 

All present seemed to enjoy them- 
selves thoroughly and left with a 
strong determination to make 1907 the 
banner year in the history of the firm. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDRY AND METAL 
INDUSTRIES 



The Pease Furnace Company of To- 
ronto resumed work this week at 
their after having: been closed 

down tor two weeks, for repairs and 

stock taking. 

The Collingwood Shipbuilding- Com- 
pany are about to lay the keel for an- 
other big vessel. The steamer will be 
490 leet long and is to be built to the 
order of the Farrar Transportation 
Company. 

The Taylor, Forbes Company's found- 
ry at Quelph suffered $5,000 damage by 
tire on January 6th. The fire only tem- 
porarily stopped the work in the 
radiator foundry, about 100 men being 
out of employment for about two days. 
The loss was fully covered by insur- 
ance. 

A new fire-clay lining for stoves has 
been invented by Mr. Werther, formerly 
superintendent of the open hearth fur- 
naces of the Dominion Iron and Steel 
Company. The basis of the preparation 
is Sydney cement, and the cost of this 
improved lining will be no greater than 
that of the ordinary iron material. 

The annual banquet given by the 
Pratt & Letchworth Company, malle- 
able iron founders of Brantford, was • 
held last week, a special train bring- 
ing O. P. Letchworth, president, and 
friends from Buffalo, where another 
branch of their works is situated. The 
company has grown immensely since 
their location in 1899, and the entire 
output now is purely malleable. They 
started with about 100 men, now 
they employ 800, and are working night 
and dav. the output for 1906 exceeded 
15,000 tons, mostly for use in the con- 
struction of cars. The company paid 
over $400,000 in wages for 1906. 

Samples of rock containing copper, 
found around the Moon River, in the 
district of Parry Sound, have been sent 
to New York for examination, and cap- 
italists there lost no time in providing 
all necessary capital for thoroughly 
testing the find. Some of the recent 
assays from the present workings show 
well the composite character of the 
vein matter. They gave silver 20 ounces, 
copper 22 per cent., gold from $10 to 
$500 per ton, with values in platinum, 
cobalt and zinc. One of the largest 
crystals of mica that perhaps has ever 
been mined has been found in one of 
these mines, it being about the size of 
an ordinary door, and required no less 
than four drill holes to dislodge it. 
The mica found, though dark in color, 
contains no iron, and improved in qual- 
ity with depth. 

The year just closed has proved a re- 
cord one for the output of coal from 
the collieries of the Nova Scotia Steel 
and Coal Co., no less than a total of 
688,085 tons being raised from three 
mines. No. 3 led, with a total outpul 
of 390.126 tons, No. 1 being second with 
257,467, and No. 5, 40,492 tons. Both 
1 and 5 collieries worked single 
shift, while No. 3 worked double shift 
and is machine-mined. The total out- 
put from the company's collier';. 
Sydney for the year 1905 was 556,306 






if* I 



The Sherwin-Williams Agent 
Builds Up a Permanent Trade 
that Competition Cannot Take 
Away* 

The foundation and keynote of our wonderful 
growth and the splendid success of our agents is 
quality. Take away all other advantages of The 
Sherwin-Williams Agency save quality and you have 
the strongest paint and varnish proposition ever 
offered a dealer. We make the best paints and 
varnishes we know how to make and the quality of 
our products wins the customer's confidence and 
future trade. 

Add to this the strongest and most effective 
selling and advertising helps ever originated to assist 
the dealer in moving the goods from his shelves and 
you have the secret of results that has made us the 
largest concern in our line in the world and our 
agents the most successful paint and varnish dealers 
in the country. Write us today for complete details 
of our proposition. 

WThe Sherwin-Williams Company 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

Canadian Headquarters and Plant: 639 Centre St., Montreal, Que. 
Warehouses: 86 York St., Toronto; 147 Bannatyne St., E., Winnipeg 



tons, and it is the intention of the 
management to increase last year's out- 
put by reaching the" million mark for 
1907. The output for 1907 is expected 
to be the largest in the history of the 
company. 

A daily newspaper quotes a director 
of the Lake Superior Corporation as 
saying : Notwithstanding the taking off 
of the bounty duly 1, the net earnings 
for four months since the close of the 
fiscal year have been fully equal to those 
for the corresponding period in 1905. 
The restored bounty went into effect 
.January 1, 1907, and from then on the 
company receives the benefit, which 
should still more favorably affect the 
business as compared with that of a 
year ago. The steel rail tonnage has 
been running about 15,000 tons a month 
and all the subsidiary companies oper- 
ated, with the exception of one trolley 
line, are contributing something to the 
net revenue, as they are all earning their 
fixed charges and something besides. 



BIG FIRMS AMALGAMATE. 

Particulars of the amalgamation of 
i he Canada Screw Company, establish- 
ed 1866. and the Ontario Tack Com- 
pany, established in 1887, two of Ham- 



ilton's largest industries, have been an- 
nounced. Nearly $2,000,000 is involv- 
ed in the deal. The plants of both 
concerns are to be considerably en- 
larged and new lines added to their pro- 
ducts. Application has been made for 
a new charter in which the capital 
slock will be greatly increased in order 
to allow for the extension of the works. 
The new company will be known as 
the Canada Screw Co., and the officers 
will be: Cyrus A. Birge, president; 
('has. Alexander, vice-president; F. H. 
Wliitton, general manager; W. F. 
Coote, secretary-treasurer; James 0. 
Callaghan, director of works. The 
other directors will be Hon. Senator 
Gibson and Charles S. Wilcox. 



COPPER KING COMING. 

It is stated that Senator W. A. 
Clark, of Montana, the great copper 
king, will shortly visit Montreal and 
Quebec in company with his wife. Mrs. 
Clark, whose maiden name is La- 
chapelle, is of 'Freneh-iCnnadian desr. 
cent, and has many relatives in Quebec 
Province. 



42 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Anvils and Vises 

Machinery Steel 

Wire Rope 

In Stock 

A.C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL 



HAND DRILLING MACHINERY 



We have the best that 
money can buy. 

Our cheaper grades are all 
good serviceable machines. 

The best value in the mar- 
ket whether you want the 
cheap or the dear kind. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 






NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 

NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co. 



WRITE US FOR 

PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 






WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE 



Prampt Shlpm*ni 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON ONT. 



ii 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
rery best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prlo. to Sal** Ag»nt» 

Orummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 



or t» 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



IIDUND. ONT. 



LlmlUd 



.FULL STOCK... 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ONT 

ST. JOHNS. QUE . 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u .i M 

HEW OLASOOW, N.S. 

Manufhoturern Of » ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMBHS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



GET PRICES FOR 



GILBERTSOJVX^ 

cometT"" 

Brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

for any purpose where the best is needed. Wide awake 
jobbers handle this brand. They are well galvanized 
true to gauge and especially soft for working up purposes 
Every sheet bears the name " Gilbertson." That is a 
guarantee. 

MAKERS! 

W. GILBERTSON & CO., Limited, 

PONTARDAWE. 80UTH WAI E8 

Agent: Alex. Gibb, 13 St. John St., Montreal. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6d. and Is. Caniitera 

'WELLINGTON 1 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glasi and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

felliiton Mi, London, England 

A grant: 

JOHN FORMAN, • 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 




HERE IS A SELLER! 
My Patent Cone Rotary Ventilator Sells on Sight. Without a Riva l. 

No modern building is perfect, from a sanitary standpoint, without it. Sent 
anywhere under guarantee. Endorsed by best architects. Booklet mailed free. 
Write to-day. Hundreds of testimonials. 

THE MONTREAL BOARD OF TRADE 
Can. Feb. 27, 1889 Geo. Hadrill, Secretary 

G- D- Pearson, Esq-. Montreal: Montreal, February oth, 1898 

Dear Sir, — In reply to your inquiry re tin- two 18" Rotary Cone Ventilators in use in this building. I 
can only say that they have now been in operation four years and ten months, during which they have not 
required attention, and are still in good order. I am quite satisfied with them, thus far 

Yours truly, JOHN YORK Supt. 

Bell Telephone 
East 2106 



GEO. D. PEARSON & CO., SK nd 1 7 Pontiac Street, MONTREAL 



Persons addressing advertisers will kindly 
mention having seen their advertisement in 
Hardware and Metal. 

43 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Class 
Company 
of Canada 
Limited 



Import 



Window 



Glass 



LOWEST PRICES 
ASK FOR THEM 



Write Nearest Office 



TORONTO 
MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



Building and Industrial News 

ItAKriWARi AND Metal would be pleased to receire from any authoritatire source building and industrial news 
of any sort, the formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, 
factories, foundries or other works, railway or mining news. All correspondence will be 
treated as confidential when desired. 



Winter doesn'1 slop building in Canada 
as is intanced by the large number of 
permits for new buildings which 'nave 
issued during December and the 
present month in all p. ills of Canada. 
For instance, in Toronto alone permits 
issued totalled to $961,000 in December 
and from .Jan. 1 to 8 the amount was 
$367,000. The figures given by us in 
this issue in several eases cover the 
totals for the past year and are grati- 
fying from even? standpoint. Even more 
pleasing, however, is the certainty that 
1907 will show even larger totals than 
the big records made in 1905 and 1906. 

London defeated the waterworks by- 
law. 

Bolton will raise $2,500 for cement 
walks. 

Harriston voted to raise money for 
school purposes. 

The new Normal School at Hamilton 
will cost $50,000. 

Thorold carried a waterworks by-law 
by a majority of 12. 

Paris defeated a by-law to raise $12,- 
000 for school purposes. 

A new Public Library will be built at 
Toronto at the cost of $250,000. 

Windsor defeated a $12,000 by-law to 
improve the electric light plant. 

Lindsay defeated the waterworks fil- 
tration by-law by a large majority. 

Collingwood defeated by-laws to 
build a new public school and a fire hall. 

Mount Forest defeated a by-law to 
abolish the Water and Light Commis- 
sion. 

Campbellford voted down a by-law to 
raise $12,000 for improvement of side- 
walks. 

Building permits for the year for Ed- 
monton totalled $1,868,098, compared 
with $702,224 in 1905. 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce will 
build a new two-storey, stone bank 
building in Sydney, N.S. 

Stratford defeated by-laws to provide 
money for a market shelter, trunk 
sewer, and implement shelter. 

At Morrisburg a by-law to provide 
$20,000 for extension and improvements 
to the electric power plant, were defeat- 
ed. 

The Waterous Engine Works, of Brant- 
ford, have taken out a building permit 
for a $4,000 addition to their main 
building. 

The amount of customs collected at 
the port of Toronto eclipses that of 1905 
by about $525,000, and is over a million 
dollars greater than 1904. 

A large saw mill will be erected by 
the Graham Island Lumber Company, at 
Massett Harbor, B.C., with a cutting 
capacity of 250.000 feet daily. 

The B. F. Graham Lumber Company 
has purchased the Taylor, Pattison Mill 
on Victoria Arm. The price paid was 
in the neighborhood of $50,000. 

The Dominion Sewer Pipe Company 
have acquired property in Hamilton and 

44 



will erect a factory, for the manufacture 
of sewer pipes, due linings, gutter pipe 
and wall coping. 

Petcrboro carried a by-law to provide 
$21,000 additional to the $40,000 al- 
ready in the hands of the Board of 
Education to erect a new collegiate 
institute, costing $01,000. 

The Canadian General Electric Com- 
pany, Petcrboro, will shortly let con- 
tracts fot a two-storey addition, 250 
feet long, to their plant. The new addi- 
tion will be for the lamp and wire de- 
partments. 

The building permits issued in Vic- 
toria, B.C., equal $633,080, nearly $40,- 
000 in advance of those of last year, and 
it is estimated that the buildings erect- 
ed in the country immediately surround- 
ing Victoria would easily total in value 
another $100, U00. 

Wortman cV Ward Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of London, have asked for a fixed 
assessment for 10 years at $25,000. The 
company began business in London 25 
years ago, on a very small scale. Now 
it employs 90 men, and is rapidly in- 
creasing its business. 

It is said that the Imperial Steel and 
Wire Company, of Collingwood, will es- 
tablish a branch in Port Arthur. r ihe 
factory will have double the capacity 
of the, one at Collingwood, and will em- 
ploy about 200 men, making wire nails, 
etc., for the western trade. 

A $50,000 factory is to be erected in 
Toronto by Business Systems, Ltd. This 
firm has made wonderful progress in the 
two years of its existence, this being 
the second time they have moved into 
larger premises, to meet with the ever 
increasing demand for their "oods. 

The contract has been let for the 
building of the Berg, Sand, Lime and 
Brick Company, in Brantford. The build- 
ings will consist of a two-storey main 
building 50 feet square, and another 
building 100 feet long. The new build- 
ings, when completed, will cost $5,000. 

The Gait Metal Works, Gait, manu- 
facturers of architectural sheet metal 
building machinery, report a 100 per 
cent, increase in their business during 
1906, and with the many new lines they 
are introducing they expect a corres- 
ponding increase during the present 
year. 

The Canada General Electric Com- 
pany and the Canada Foundry Company 
who are just completing additions to 
their buildings at Petcrboro and To- 
ronto, are again required to enlarge to 
meet with the ever increasing demand 
for their products, which are largely 
used in construction work. 

The Munro Wire Works, in Winnipeg, 
have extended their plant to meet with 
the increased business. This new build- 
ing cost about $30,000, and is : et apart 
tor the production of all kinds cf wire 
mattresses and the handling tf iron 
beds. The Northwestern Brass Co. are 
erecting a steel building, 80x100- feet, 
at the cost of $40,000. 

The Vancouver Portland Cement Com- 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



paiiv has been incorporated with a sharp 
capita] of $1,500,000, foi the purpose of 
manufacturing cement, and all kinds of 
building materials, with head office in 
Tin .mill. The directors arc .1. s. 
Lovell, W. Bain, K. Towahs, E. W. Mc 
Ncill, VV. F. Ralph, H. Chambers and 

C. II. Blank, all of Tot onto. 

The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., in 

•dcr Id "iH through the purchase of l% 
tensive coal lands about the Lin'ean nro- 
DertieS, have decided to form a SUbsid- 
iarv compaiiv which will issue honds to 
cover the purchase of the properties 
These bonds will be euararteed hv the 
Oominion Iron and Steel Co. Tf is in- 
fowled that from the stui thi« sub- 
sidiary c(>iiie;i''" should have a sinkine: 
fund into which will pn all monevs above 
whal is remiired for Ihe interest on the 
honds. and in this wa-" the purchase of 
the properties will he gradually provid- 
ed for. 

Resides electin' 1 " a Water and Light 
Commission for 1007. the town of C.od- 
erich passed three industrial hv-laws, 
the loans in connection with which ae- 
c-resiatc $75,000. The Kensinfton Furni- 
ture Company "ill now double their 
plant, and the Oodcrich Carriage Oom- 
panv. a new concern backed bv local 
men. will take over Walter's carriage 
"•oiks, and will spend SI I a. 000 in en- 
larging and adding machinery. The 
Poirers Mfg. Co.. who have acquired the 
plint of the Goderich Engine Works, 
will also spend a large sum in adding 
to the present plant, and will go into 
the manufacture of iournal-boxcs. and 
other railwav specialties: it is under- 
stood that thev will take un 1be con- 
struction of railway snow-ploughs. 

The development of the agricultural 
unnlemcnt trade at Retina continues at 
a remarkable rale. The fact that six 
million dollars' worth of implements 
were sold there in 1000 has apparently 
spurred the bi<r concerns not now re- 
presented to establisb warehouses. It is 
announced that the Xiehols-Rhepard Co., 
of Rattle Creek. Mich., is about to move 
its western headquarters from Winnipeg 
to Retrina, It is now negotiating for a 
large site there and at least two other 
la ra:e concerns have similar action under 
contemplation. All these will probably 
-nove bere in the early Spring. In ad- 
dition to this several important Cana- 
dian and American concerns which are 
now doing business there in only a small 
way will open large establishments as 
soon as Spring begins. From present 
indications the building; of warehouses 
will be one of the features of Retrina's 
constructive programme during 1007. 

Montreal will have a busy 1907. Dur- 
ing; the vear the Simplex Car Works, 
along; .the Lachine Canal, are to be 
greatly extended, so as to srive double 
the ordinary capacity. The Canada Car 
Company have already more orders than 
they can attend to, and mav also have 
to extend. In the same neighborhood 
are the Allis-Rullock-Chalmers machin- 
ery works, the Wire Works, and the 
Radiator factory, while the new cotton 
eomnany, which is to build a factory at 
Lachine in the Spring or Summer, is 
materializing. Tn the east end. the Lo- 
comotive Works at Loneue Pointe are 
to be extended at a cost of $1,000,000. 
In the neighborhood of the Angus shops 
a new town has grown un. and this will 
be added to during the Spring and Sum- 
mer, for the C.P.R. cannot overtake its 
own orders at these shops, which are 
the largest and best equipped on the 



continent. There will he more building 
in Montreal proper during the coming 

year than in any previous year, it is 

predicted. 

VOTES ON PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS 

The councils of a large number of On- 
tario cities and towns submilted by 
laws at the municipal elections 611 
7, to raise money by \\a\ of debentures 
for various improvements. In the ma- 
jority of cases these hv-l.iws were car- 
ried. 

Southampton decided to raise $.".,111111 
to extend the waterworks system 

Nana nee passed by-laws to Improve 

the town's sewerage. 

Waterloo voted 300 for and 74 against 
the sewer commission proposal, and also 
carried a by-law for a $23,000 loan for 
sewer farm improvements. 

St. Catharines voted favorably for 
extension of the waterworks. 

Listowel decided by 17 votes to raise 
$14,500 1o construct new bridges. 

Brant ford carried sewer extension by- 
law. 

Almonte decided to appoint an elec- 
tric light commission. 

Kincardine carried the Grand Trunk 
station, Coleman, and Park by-law. 

Woodstock endorsed by-laws to es- 
tablish a parks commission and to raise 
$20,000 for sewer extensions. 

Tn a quiet vote Giieiph took a jump 
forward in its municipal government 
bv deciding in favor of commissions t« 
manage its waterworks and gas and 
electric light plants. The vote for the 
waterworks commission was 1,132 for 
3' 6 against ; for gas and electric light 
commission, 1.101 for 371 against, and 
to loan $25,000 to enable Morlock Bros, 
to extend their factory, OfiO for, 150 
against. 

Renfrew, by a vote of 1 36 to 103, de- 
cided to raise $6,000 for sewer exten- 
sions, and the county system- of good 
roads was carried, 171 to 65. 

Rowmanville decided to have its wa- 
terworks managed by a commission. 

TO AID INDUSTRIES. 

Windsor passed by a majority of 60 
an industrial by-law intended to enable 
the council to arrange with manufactur- 
ers seeking; locations. 

Whitby carried the Ontario Car 
Works by-law. 359 for and "18 against. 

Wing-ham will loan the Wing-ham Car- 
riage Co. $5,000. 

Onlv six voted asrainst the by-law 
submitted at Deseronto, granting- the 
Deseronto Furniture Co. a loan of $10.- 
000. 

Welland carried a bv-law granting 
fixed assessment and other concessions 
to the Robertson Machinery Co. 

Ooderich decided to aid the Rog-ers 
Manufacturing- Co.. the Furniture Co.. 
and the Carriag-e Co. 

Amherstburg defeated a bv-law to 
siant aid in establishing- a canning- 
factory, the renuired number of favor- 
able votes not being- polled. 

Orang-eville ratified a loan of $15,000 
to the Hurndall Novelty Manufacturing 
Co. by 415 majority. 

Onlv 3 voted n.iv and 134 yea on the 
bv-law submitted in Cavug-a to g-ive the 
Window Class Manufacturing- Co. 14 
acres of land and tax exemption. 

The by-law to aid in the rebuilding- of 
the old T)yment Foundrv at Rai rie se- 
cured 17.^ v. >tes short of the required 
number. 

45 



BEST ELBOWS 

FOR 

CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 





i£Xyfnncurm :? 



PLAIN ROUND. 

CORRUGATED. 



Made in . . . 

6 Materials. 
5 Angles. 
14 Sizes. 
1,225 Varieties. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 

Ferdinand Dieckhann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AVE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



!§°^ GREETINGS 0§°z 




Let us embrace this opportunity of thanking our many friends through- 
out Canada, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, for the extensive patronage they 
have extended us during 1906, and to wish them one and all a HAPPY AND 
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR. 

Our business has been away ahead of any previous year, which 
we believe is due to the quality of our goods, and to the fact that we make a full 
line, both in hockey «nd self-fastening skates, and in skates for pleasure and 
fancy skating ; in fact, skates to suit everybody. 

Our representative is now on the road, and will call on you shortly ; but 
in case you wish prices or information quickly, and would rather not wait for 
him, drop us a line ; we are always pleased to answer letters. 



"MIC-MAC"and 
"REX" Hockey 
Sticks are only 
made by us. Be 
sure you have 
Sticks with the 
registered trade 
marks. They are 
the Sticks that give 
players the best 
satisfaction. 





C 



Here we show our Genuine Acme also the Acme with 
Ankle Support. This is the world's leader in self-fastening 
skates. No doubt of that. Some makers have imitated it, but 
there is no skate that has the quality and general excellence that 
the *cme has. To give your customer the very best satisfaction, 
you must sell them the Genuine Acme. In the interest of your 
own business, be sure that you buy only the Genuine Acme. 




HIGHEST AWARDS WHEREVER EXHIBITED 
AT INTERNATIONAL AND OTHER EXHIBITIONS 

GOLD MEDAL AT THE 
DOMINION EXHIBITION 1S06 



THE 



STARR MFG. C? 



MITED 



Head Office and Works, DARTMOUTH, N.S. 
Branch Office, 126 Wellington St. W., TORONTO 

4<'» 



We use only 
straight grain se- 
lected second 
growth yellow 
birch in making 
our Hockey 
Sticks. They have 
the correct shape 
and balance and 
are made to stand 
rough usage. 




HARDWARE AND METAl. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading 2c. a word first 
nsertion ; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no oase can this rule be overlooked. 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot he 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



w 



ANTED-Good practical tinsmith; $1K.00 weekly 
to the right man; steady job. Apply H. H. 
Gervan, Chilliwack, B.C. (5) 



WANTED -Man with two or three thousand dollars 
to take half interest in old established hardware 
and tinsmith business in good town. Box 575, 
HARDWARE AND METAL. (4) 

WANTED— Two first-class hardware salesmen, one 
to travel west and north of London, and one to 
travel Toronto and vicinity; reply by letter stat- 
ing experience, references, age and salary, to Box 576, 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (3) 

WANTED — Experienced young man, thoroughly 
conversant with builders' hardware, as traveller 
for the city. Apply stating references and salary 
required to E. G. Prior & Co., Ltd., Victoria, B.C. (3) 



TRAVELLER WANTED 



TO sell a line of established successful coal heaters, 
also wood heaters, on commission; must cover 
territory twice or oftener, say once between 
January and April and again between May and August ; 
state lines now carried and territory covered; liberal 
commission given; Box 573, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. [1] 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



QTOVES An established, successful working line of 
O patent coal, also wood heaters, for sale ; including 
patent, patterns, materials and some completed 
stoves; also machinery and dies, if wanted; will go 
with a line of heaters or ranges, or to sell with some 
hardware specialty; proprietor has other pressing 
interests. Address Box 574, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. [1] 

HARDWARE ANDTINWARE business for sale in a 
thriving town in Eastern Ontario; stock reduced 
to $1,500; good dairying country, rare chance 
for new beginner ; going out of business on account of 
ill health. Apply at once to D. Courville, Maxville, 
Ont. [3] 

FOR SALE-A fully equipped Wire Mill and Nail 
Factory as a going concern, with about 500 tons 
of wire rods; factory situated on 150 ft. of water- 
front with trackage optional to buyer. B.C. Wire and 
Nail Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. (7) 



SITUATION WANTED. 



II 



ARDWAREMAN (28) open for engagement; west 
Box 91. HARDWARE AND METAL, Win- 
nipeg. (4) 



CARRIAGE 
SPRINCS& AXLES 

ANCHOR /^4 
BRAND >&5y 

THE CUELPH SPRING & AXLE CO. 

LIMITED 

CUELPH, ONT. 



IT WILL PAY YOU 

during the coming year to handle 

"M.R.M." brand HORSE SHOES 



A FEW REASONS WHY: 

We want your trade. 

Our shoes are made to suit the best class of the farrier 
trade. 

They are asked for by farriers all over the country. 
Wherever used, they have given universal satisfaction. 

The above we feel confident will convince you that it 
will be to your advantage to handle the "M.R.M." brand. 



The Montreal Rolling Mills Co. 



Hardware Dealers Should Wake Up— 

to the fact that SHEET METAL BUILDING GOODS could be made a Urge 
and ever increasing factor iu their business. Farmers, manufacturers and 
all owners and builders are daily demanding these goods because they fill 
satisfactorily the gap which is being left by the diminishing supply of 
good and cheap timber. Some dralers have alieady established a consider- 
able trade in this line, proving that it can be done, but it's "onlv as a drop 
in the bucket" compared to what's to come. If the HARDWARE 
DEALERS and TINSMITHS don't look after this valuable trade, they will 
live to regret it. Some one else will reap the harvest. 

Don't say— 'There's nothing in it for rne"— because there certainly is, 
providing you have the RIGHT GOODS and the RIGHT FIRM behind them. 
It doesn't matter about the manufacturers who sell direct to the consumer. 
One good, square firm, who will PROTECT and HELP a good orginization 
of agents, can, with those agents, do more business than three or four of 
the other kind. 

We can show you — all we need to prove to you how this combination 
will work in 1907 is some more good agents — we've got the goods and 
the other qualifications. One of our representatives will be along your 
way soon after New Years to talk to you on the subject. If you are 
interested drop us a line at once and make certain that you will not be 
missed. 



The 



GALT ART METAL CO., Limited, GALT, ONT. 

Western Distributing Agents, THE McCLARY MFC. CO., Winnipeg and Calgary. 




Will Hold up a Shelf "THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 



That's what a shelf bracket ia for. 
For thla purpoae there can be 
Nothino Bitter. Nothing 
Cheaper than the BRADLEY STEEL 
BRACKET. It ia well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The »»tui« on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at whiob the goods 
are sold. Order direot or through your Jobbers. 

ATLAS MFQ. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., 

47 



Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables— 
"Machinery," Newport, 



Emlyn Engineering Works 
NEwroKT, Mon. England 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




CAUSES C? VARNISH CRACKING. 

"Techno" in wi ting upon the subject 
of the cracking ol varnish in The Decor 
ator, says "So much has already been 
said on this subject that it will only be 
necessarj to summarize here the causes 
and their avoidance. Various causes 
produce cracks ol distinct character. 
The addition of terebine to a varnish 
for hardening will often cause cracking, 
especially when exposed to direct sun 
light. These cracks at first vivo the 
varnish a >ilk\ appearance, due to their 
hair like fineness and great numbers. 
Subsenuently many of the cracks open 
out wider under atmospheric variations. 
Hut the crack due to terebine is always 
sharp and clean, and mostly straight, 
as though cut with a razor edge, cross 
ing- the work in all directions. Tere 
bine is sometimes used in graining color 
and other undercoats prior to varnish- 
ing. In such cases the cracks will show 
their origin t<> be in undercoats by the 
depth of every crack, while if the var- 
nish only be at fault the undercoats will 
in many parts remain unaffected. 

The amplication of an\ hard, nuick- 
drying coat of paint or varnish on a 
soft undercoat is liable to cause crack- 
ing, and would affect any super-eoat 
likewise. This may sometimes be trace- 
able to a grlaze coating- prior to var- 
nishing, to a ffold-s ; /.e and turps flatting 
coat on an oily ground or to a hard- 
drvo'"- varnish on a soft groundwork. 
Goldsize cracks are distinguishable b-- 
their usually iviivr in the direct line of 
the brush work, and having soft round 
edges, turning- inwards, the cracks being- 
less numerous but more open than tere- 
bine cracks. 

The application of a coat of size upon 
a hard, non-porous ground prior to 
varnishing. • such as sometimes occurs 
when re-varnishing old work in cheap 
jobs, if the size be fairly strong, will 
sometimes result in cracks, the cracks 
bein" notablv of nolvgon shape and the 
edges having- a tendency to curl out- 
wards. 

Cracking sometimes occurs onlv where 
knots exist in the woodwork. That is 
erenorallv due to the preliminary use of 
too much shellac or patent knotting- de- 
stroying; the norous key of the wood, 
leaving- no hold for the priming coat. 
As no affinity exists between the srH- 
lac and the oil paint, the latter cracks 
bv irregular contrition and expansion 
of the paint and the wood. The remedy 
is to scrape down to the bare wood and 
to miint ag-ain without fresh knotting 
or after a thin co-it M f reduced strength, 
in case of new woodwork. 

To avoid tendency to cracking, I 
is no better course than to take care 
that every coat prior to varnishing, be 
thin, and allowed to dry hard before 
applying- the following coat. Tt is im- 
portant also that no nuick dryinsr medi- 
um, such as eroldsize or terebine. be 
emnloyed in painting over a coat mixed 
with ordinary linseed or boiled oil. 
though the reverse order mav be em- 
ployed without danger, and in ease ,f 



quick drying paint being- necessary, em- 
ploy no oil at all, excepting- for the 
ing coat on new wood, and the 
finishing varnish may then be elastic or 
hard as desired without danger of clack- 
ing. A hard varnish may be used as 
an undercoat, and an elastic finishing 
over-varnish over that. But the re- 
verse order may give rise to the fault 
under notice." 

TURPENTINE. 

Turpentine is a product of the pine 

tree, and in this country almost the 
entire consumption is produced from the 
yellow or long-leaf pine of the gulf 
■ I ates. 

Formerly vast sections of all the 
states south of the Virginias and the 
Ohio river and east of the Mississippi 
were covered with immense forests of 
yellow pine, but at the present time the 
turpentine belt is confined to the gulf 
states. Though all the available re- 
sources in the adjoining- states have not 
been exhausted, the end is plainly in 
sight unless the devastation, caused by 
the criminally wasteful methods of pro- 
duction, can be checked. 

The chief use of turpentine is in paints 
and varnishes, where it is employed as 



a volatile thinning- agent and is valued 
for its peuet i at ing and binding quali- 
ties. It evaporates Ln the right mannei 

leaving no residue. It has the peculiar 
property of forming ozone, which in 
practically a condensed form of oxygen, 
and as oxygen is the cause of the dry- 
ing of the paints and varnishes, turpcn 
tine to this extent serves a double pur 
pose. 

About 13 per cent, of the thinning- ve- 
hicle used in the manufacture of best 
prepared paint (outside white) is tin 
pentine and japan driers, says Co opera 
tion and Expansion. We have found 
that this proportion answers the pur- 
pose for which it. is intended on finish- 
ing coats. On the priming- coat, how- 
ex er, more turpentine should be added, 
and especially when painting hard pine, 
(the source of turpentine in this coun- 
try), turpentine should constitute from 
25 to 40 per cent, of the total amount 
of thinners used. 

Combinations of producers and fac- 
tors or merchants have had some effect 
upon prices in recent years ; but no 
combination, however effective, in an 
industry so widespread as this, could 
have raised the price of a product to 
the present current prices for turpen- 
tine. 



Looking Back Over 1906 

if you have not been an Elastilite 
agent you can readily see where 
one mistake has been made. 

Elastilite Varnish is an old reliable 
yet the up-to-the-minute line for 
1907. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



I The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA. 



LIMITED 



Stocks at 



V* 



VANCOUVER, B.C., c/o DURAND MERCHANDISE CO. 
WINNIPEG, MAN., c/o MASON & HICKEY. 

48 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Would You Throw a Man Out of Your Store ? 

A MAN who had never harmed you— a man who intended to treat you squarely and 
honorably— a man capable of landing a score of customers inside your place within 
one year— would you pitch that sort of man out of your storo ? 

The Hardware Dealer who hands out any old paint to a man is doing ivorse than that. When that inan sees the beauty of 
your paint fade away as quickly as the beauty of a ballet dancer— when he sees your "just as good " paint peel off, blister, et 
cetera, he preaches your paint defects to scores of possible customers within a year— and his style of preaching is " peppery 
and to the point." 

DONT TAKE CHANCES. STOCK OUR PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

Get our Catalogue. A post card brings It 

STANDARD PAINT AND VARNISH WORKS CO., LIMITED 

WINDSOR ONTARIO 



YOU'LL HAVE 
TO HURRY! 

Now that the Paint 
Season is again upon you, 
it behooves you to make up 
your mind on the lines you 
are going to carry. 

Housekeepers will soon 
be asking you for the paints 
they will need in the annual 
housecleaning. If you have 
been supplying them with 
the old-fashioned fl o o r 
paints, it is time for you to 

Turn Over a New Leaf 

We have the goods that 
will build your reputation. 
They dry quickly, and leave 
a hard, glossy finish, which 
neither sticks, rubs oft', nor 
cracks. You take no 
chances, for we positively 
guarantee these qualities. 

They are just what your 
customers want, and we 
have them in all the popular 
colors. We are talking about 

Jamleson's Floor Enamels 

MADE ONLY BY 

R. C. JAMIESON & GO. 

LIMITED 

16-30 Nazareth St., MONTREAL 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

•• HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MOiMREAL 

Loudens Double Strap Barn Door Hangers 

Are the Standard 

They Have Case Hardened Bearings, Track Scrapers, Revolving Washers. 

They hold the door closer to the track, hang perfectly plumb, and 
allow the door to hang closer to the wall than other hangers do, while 
they are just as flexible, and are the easiest running hangers made. 




Manufactured by 



LOUDI 



IM MACHINI 
GUELPH, ONT. 



RY OO 



We manufacture 15 different styles of Hay Carriers, 10 different 
style* of Barn D >or Hang-rs, also Feed and Litter Carriers, Cow 
Stanchions, Barn Door Latches, etc. 




GLAZERS' DIAMONDS OF PROVED WORTH 

Having a Century's Reputation for Reliability. 
MADE BY 

A. SHAW & SON, London, EIng. 

CANADIAN AGENT 

GODFREY S. PELTON, 201 Coristine Building, Montreal 



The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

R. E. THORNE & CO. 

The only bronze powder works under the British flag. 
High Crade bronze powders and bronze liquids. 
Can fill all orders at short notice. 

MONTREAL — TORONTO 

WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD. NO ORDER TOO LARGE 



Are you interested in any of the lines that are advertised ? 
A Post Card will bring you price list and full information. 
Don't forget to mention Hardware and Metal. 



-19 



HARDWARE AND METAl 




An Important Announce- 
ment regarding "An= 
chor" and "English" 
Liquid House Paints. 



ITOR some time we have been 
supplying the trade with 
Paints put up under both brands, 
but for various reasons we find 
it advisable to sell hereafter only 
"ENGLISH" LIQUID HOUSE 
PAINTS. The two brands were 
identical in quality, the only 
White Lead used in their manu- 
facture being Brandram's B. B. 
Genuine White Lead, the world's 
standard for close on to two cen- 
turies. So when we sell you 
"ENGLISH" LIQUID HOUSE 
PAINTS in place of "AN- 
CHOR," you will know that 
you are getting the same Paints 
as you ordered under " AN- 
CHOR,'' and we would ask you 
to get into the way of specifying 
"ENGLISH" in your orders in 
place of "ANCHOR." We 
would also ask you to tell your 
cnstomers that " ANCHOR " 
Liquid HoU8e Paints are now 
called "ENGLISH," and so 
assist us to familiarize consumers 
with the name "ENGLISH" as 
the name of the leading brand 
of LIQUID HOUSE PAINTS. 

We maintain the "ANCHOR" 
trade mark on all our other 
Specialties. 



BRANDRAM- 
HENDERSON 



LIMITED 



Halifax, St. John, 
Montreal, Winnipeg, 

MARSHALL WELLS CO., Winnipeg 
Sole Distributors (or Western Canada 



Paint and Oil Markets 



MONTREAL. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, JaDUMJ II, 1907 

Now that the holidays are over, tla 
vellers are brushing up theii samples 

and prices and business has again as- 
Mimed a more lively aspect. While ship 
meats just now are not very heavy, a 
good Bow of orders is coming in for 
February and later shipments. 

White lead maintains its advances and 
it looks as if there would be a scarcity 
ill the dry article before the arrival of 
early spring shipments. 

Linseed oil keeps steady, without any 
special features. 

Turpentine in barrels shows an ad- 
vance of two cents per gallon over last 
week's prices. 

Benzine in barrels drops five cents per 
gallon, 

The Martin-Senour paint has been ad- 
vanced 5 cents per gallon, and is now 
quoted at $1.50 pints, $1.45 quarts, 
and $1.40 gallons. ■ 

LINSEED Oil,— Remains the 

same : Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 55c; 5 
to 9 barrels, 54c; boiled, 1 to 4 barrels, 
.78c; 5 to 9 barrels, 57c 

TURPENTINE— (In barrels) shows an 
advance of 2 cents per gallon. Smaller 
quantities remain the same. We 

quote : Single barrel, 9'8c. per 
gal. ; two barrels or over, 

97c per gal.; for smaller quantities than 
ban els, 5c extra per gal. is charged 
.Standard gallon is 8.40 lbs., f.o.b. point 
of shipment, net 30 days. 

■ GRDUND WHITE LEAD— Maintains 
its advance. Best brands, Gov- 

ernment Standard, $7.25 to 

$7.50; No. 1, $6.00 to $7.15; No.2.$6.55 
to $6.90; No. 3, $0.30 to $6.55 all f.o.b., 
Montreal. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— We still quote as 
follows : V.M. Red Seal, 7*c. to 8c; 
Red Seal, 7c to 8c ; French V.M., 6c to 
7c ; Lehigh, 5c to 6c 

WHITE ZINC— (Ground in oil) Prices 
remain firm at their recent advance. We 
quote : Pure, 8.',c to 9$c. ■; No. 
1, 7c to 8c; No. 2, 5?c. to l^c 

PUTTY — A heavy demand is 

shown. We quote prices: Pure 

linseed oil, $1.75 to $1.85; bulk in bar- 
rels, $1.50; in 25 lb. irons, $1.80; in 
tins, $1.90 ; bladder putty in barrels, 
$1.75. 

ORANGE MINERAL- Prices are as 
follows : Casks, 8c: 10(1 tb. kegs, 8^c 

RED LEAD— The following quotations 
are firm: Genuine red lead in casks, 
$6.00 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $6.25 ; in 
less quantities at the rate of $7 per 100 
lbs. ; No. 1 red lead, casks, $5.75 ; kegs 
$6, and smaller quantities, $6.75. 

PARIS GREEN The following 
still bold good : In bar- 
rels, about 600 pounds, 23jc. 
I>er ft).: in arsenic kegs, 250 lbs., 

50 



We quote: 



WINDOW 
First breal 
break, 50 
100 feet. 



23 Jc; in 50 lb. drums, 24c; in 25 lb. 
drums, 24 .Jc; in 1 lb. packets, 100 lbs. 
in case, 25c; in 1 lb packets, 50 lbs in 
case, 25$c,j in J lb. packets, 100 lbs in 
case, 27c; in 1 lb. tins, 26c. f.o.b. 
Montreal. Term three months net or 
2 per cent. 30 days. 

SHELLAC- We quote : Bleached, 

in liars or ground, 16c. per ra . 
E.O.b. Eastern Canadian points; 
bone dry, 57c. per ft.", f.o-b. Eastern 
Canadian points; T. N. orange, etc, 
48c per lb. f.o.b. New York. 

SHELLAC VARNISH— Prices re- 
main : Pure white, $2.1)0 to $2.95 ■ 
pure orange, $2.70 to $2.75 ; No. 1 
orange, $2.50 to $2.55. 

MIXED PAINTS-Prices range from 
$1.20 to $1.50 per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL— Our prices are : Firsts 
in cases, 8-Jc; in barrels, 8c; seconds in 
cases, 8c; in barrels, 7Jc 

BENZINE— (in barrels) Drop 5 cts. 
We quote : 20 cts. per gallon. 

GASOLINE— (In barrels) 
22£ cts. per gallon. 

PETROLEUM— (In barrels) Our 

prices are : American prime white 
coal, 15^0. per gallon. American wat- 
er, 17c per gallon; Pratt's Astral, 19£c. 
per gallon. 

GLASS — Our prices are: 
50 feet, $1.85; second 

feet, $1.95 ; first break. 
$3.20 ; second break, 
100 feet, $3.40; third break, 100 feet, 
$3.95; fourth break, 100 feet, $4.15 ■ 
fifth break, 100 feet, $4.40; sixth break' 
100 feet, $4.95. Diamond Star : First 
break, 50 feet, $2.30 ; second break, 50 
feet, $2.50 ; first break, loo feet, $4.40 
second break, $4.80 ; third break, 100 
feet, $5.75 ; fourth break, 10U feet, 
$6.50 ; fifth break, 100 feet, $7.50 ; sixth 
break, 100 feet, $7.50; seventh break, 
tOO feet, $8 ; eighth break, 100 feet, $9. 
Double Diamond : First break, 50 feet, 
$3.45 ; second break, 50 feet, $3.75 ; 
first break, 100 feet, $6.75 ; second 
break, 100 feet, $7.25 ; third break, 100 
feet, $8.75 ; fourth break, 100 feet, $10; 
fifth break, 100 feet, $11.50 ; sixth 
break, 100 feet, $12.50 ; seventh break, 
100 feet, $14 ; eighth break, 100 feet, 
$16.50 ; ninth break, 100 feet, $18 ; tenth 
break, 100 feet, $20 ; eleventh break, 
100 feet. $24 ; twelfth break, 100 feet, 
$28.50. Discount on Diamond Star, 20 
per cent.; on Double Diamond, 40 pei 
cent. 



TORONTO. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan 11, 18 7. 

Very few changes have to be report- 
ed in paint and oil markets this week. 
We have changed our las i week's quota- 
tions of raw and boiled oi] and no,v 
quote: 1 to 3 barrels, raw. 59c; 4 to 
7 barrels, raw. 57c ; is and over, 16c, 
adding 3 cents for boiled. 

Domestic lines, such as aluminum 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Does your paint trade pay? 



Tt pays m.-im othex 
men. li oughl to 
|)uv you. There's 
paint used in your 
town — lots of it. 
Are you getting your 
share? You should! 

Take a look at 

Ramsay's 
Paints 



for 1007. x\sk for color cards, prices, con- 
ditions. 

(let a paint that pays and the paint will 
pay YOU. 

Want to see our traveller ? We'll 
send him if you say so. 

A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 




Kit. 1842 



MONTREAL 



PAINT MAKERS 



Just try some ordinary green paint 
on a panel of wood, see how hard it 
works, — don't cover, lacks body. Then 
try on another panel 

LUCAS IMPERIAL 
FRENCH CREEN 



notice how easy it spreads, how well it 
covers, — that's body. Makes the cost 
less for this rfason alone, and stays 
fresh and brilliant. It preserves the 
wood, keeps the weather out and the 
color in. It is the ONE Green that is 
free from arsenic or verdigris. 

BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 

JOHN LUCAS & CO. 



NEW YORK, 



PHILADELPHIA, 



CHICACO 



JJ 



"Extry! "Extry! 



the newsboy's cry. 

We all want the "EXTRA" the something 
out of the ordinary. Someone has said, " It is 
the 'Extras' that make life worth the living." 

The "EXTRA" news brings the "EXTRA" 
pennies to the newsboy. 

The "EXTRA" quality of goods or service 
brings the "EXTRA" dollars to the business 
man. 



EXTRA brings EXTRA 

Now, What we have to offer 
is the Exclusive Agency of 

The Martin-Senour Paint 



THE PAINT THAT IS 

100 per cent pure 

The absolute purity of The Martin-Senour 
House Paint has been the means of obtaining 
"EXTRA" profitable returns to our agents. 

The Martin-Senour Paint is not only as 
pure as the average mixed paint but it is a little 
"EXTRA" it's 100 per cent. pure. 

We would be glad to tell you more about it. 



The 



Martin-Senour Co., 



Ltd. 



"Pioneers of Pure Paints" 

142-144 Inspector St., - Montreal 

2514-2520 Quarry Street and Archer Avenue 
Chicago 

(Established 1878) 

The Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co. The Maritime Paint & Varnish Co. 
Winnipeg Halitax, N.S. 



51 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



r Extract 1 

From the 
Montreal 
Daily Star, 
January 3, 1907 

PAINT AND OIL MARKET. 

CANADIAN PARIS 
GREEN HAS TAKEN 
QUITE AN UPWARD 
MOVEMENT, BEING 
QUOTED AT 25c. IN 
POUND PAPERS, BRING. 
ING IT TO THE SAME 
LEVEL AS THE IM- 
PORTED ARTICLE. 
MANY CLAIM THE CANA- 
DIAN PARIS GREEN IS 
BETTER THAN ANY- 
THING ON THE MAR- 
KET. 

To prevent disappoint- 
ment please look for the 

Canada Paint 
Company's 



name upon each pack- 




varnish, etc., are selling well, and book 
orders for these articles are received 
daily. Travelers all report the outlook 
for the business of 1907 even greater 
than thai of 1906. 

WHITE LEAD -Ex Toronto pure 
white, $7.40; No. 1. $6.65; No. 2. $6.25; 

No. ;>. $5.90; No. I. $5.65 in 

of 25 pounds and upward-; 1 '_><• per 

pound extra will be charged for 12 1-2 
pound packages; genuine dry while 
lead in casks, $7.00. 

RED LEAD— Genuine in casks of 500 
lbs., $6.00; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., 
$6.50; No. 1 in casks of 500 lbs., $5.75; 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $6.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— In casks, 7 
l-2c; in 100 lbs., 8c, No. 1, in casks 
6 l-2c, in 100 lbs., 7c. 

WHITE ZINC ("round in oil) -In 25- 
lb. irons, 8c; in 12 1-2 lbs., 8 l-2c. 
_ SHINGLE STAIN-In 5-gallon lots, 
75c to 80c. per gallon. 

PARIS WHITE— 90c. in barrels to 
$1.25 per 100 lbs. 

WHITING— 60c. per 100 lbs. in bar- 
rels; Gilders' bolted whiting', 90c. in 
barrels, $1.15 in smaller quantities. 

SHELLAC VAxtNlSH— Pure orange 

in barrels, $2.70; white, $2.82 1-2 per 
barrel; No. 1 (orange) $2.50; gum shel- 
lac, bone dry, C3c, Toronto. T. N. 
(orange) 51c. net Toronto. 

LINSEED OIL— We now quote raw, 

1 to 3 barrels, .")!)c ; 4 to 7 barrels, 57c; 
8 and over, 56c, add 3c to this price 
tor boiled oil. Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don and Guelph net 30 days. 

TURPENTINE— Single barrels, 97c; 

2 to 4 barrels, 96c; f.o.b. point of 
shipment, net 30 days. Less than bar- 
rels, $1.02 per gallon. 

GLUES-French Medal, 12 l-2c. per 
pound; domestic shee:, 10 l-2c. per lb. 

PUTTY— Ordinary, 800 casks, $1.50; 
100 drums, $1.75, barrels or bladders, 
$1.75; 100-lb. cases, $1.90;; 25-lb. irons, 
$1.85; 25-lb. tins (4 to case) $1.90; 12 
i lb. tins (8 to case) $2.10. 

LIQUID PAINTS-Pure, $1.20 to 
$1.35 per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gal- 
lon. 

BARN PAINTS— Gals., 70c. to 80c. 

BRIDGE PAINTS— Gals., 75c. to $1. 

CASTOR OIL-English, in cases, 9 
l-2c. to 10c. per lb., and lie. for single 
tins. 

PARIS GREEN— Canadian manufac- 
turers are quoting their base price at 
25c and on the English, 25% is quoted 
f.o.b., Toronto. 

REFINED PETROLEUM — Dealers 
are stocking up heavily for the Winter. 
We still quote : Canadian prime white, 
14c. ; #ater white, 16c. ; American wa- 
•:er white, 16c. to lfcc. ex warehouse. 

CRUDE PETROLEUM — We quote : 
Canadian, $1.32 ; Pennsylvania, $1.58 ; 
Ohio, 96c. 



FACTORY FOR ST. JOHNS, NFLD. 

The Canadian trade agent at St. John 
Nnd. reports thai the Standard Manu- 
facturing Company oi that place arc 

about to add to their other lines of 
business, that oi making paint. The 

manage' | 1;i > gone to the United StateB 
to look up the necessary machinery and 
make Other arrangements in connection 
with the proposal. A small factory 
making copper paint for the use of ves- 
sels has been in operation for some 
years, and having acquired control of 
the local demand, and driven the 
American made article out of the 
market, has not thought it necessary 
to advertise it in any way. The total 
quantity of paint used here is not very 
large, and the latest available figures 
give the importations as follows : — 
From Great Britain, $25,942 ; from 
Canada, $24,532 ; from United States, 
$16,718 ; total, $66,742. 

The duty on paint is 30 per cent, ad 
valorem, and it is considered that there 
is a favorable opening under this pro- 
tection for a successful industry prob- 
ably amounting to a value of over 
$100,000 a year. 

A SEALING CEMENT. 

The composition of a cement to se- 
curely seal receptacles closed bv screw- 
cap (or, in fact, by any other method) 
must necessarily depend upon the nature 
of the contents of the vessel. If of an 
alcoholic, oleaginous or resinous nature, 
for instance, it would require a cement 
differing from that which would be re- 
quired for an aqueous solution. 

For the first class of articles a ce- 
ment made with water-soluble gums, 
gelatin, etc., would be appropriate, 
while for the other class, rosin, shellac, 
etc., would answer. For a sealing wax 
of the first class, kasein dissolved in a 
5 per cent, aqueous solution of borax 
would answer, and so would any of the 
following : Borax, 1 part ; water, 7 
parts ; shellac, sufficient to make the 
solution of the desired thickness. A 
solution of glue would also answer. 

For the second class try a mixture 
of clear rosin, 12 parts; blond shellac, 
20 parts; turpentine, 6 parts; dissolved 
in oil of turpentine. A little experi- 
mentation along these lines will enable 
you to get a satisfactory article. 



TURPENTINE FROM PUIiP. 

A Maine company is successfully 
making turpentine from spruce pulp 
waste. Heretofore the product has been 
obtained practically wholly from south- 
ern pine. The Industrial Journal, of 
Bangor, Me., says that "the turpentine 
obtained as a by-product in the manu- 
facture of spruce pulp answers all pur- 
poses of pine turpentine. The ordinary 
person could never tell the difference be- 
tween the two." 



Fame is delightful, but as collateral 
il does not rank high. 

Be moderate in the use of every 

thing exeepi fresh air and sunshine. 
a man a man. 



The Canadian Pacific Railway has 
completed another huge irrigation pro 

ject, in Southern Alberta, by which a 
v alley l- r )0 miles in length by 40 miles 
in width is being brought under culti 
vation. This block of irrigated lands 
alone is estimated to have room for 
half a million people, and it is a sig- 
nificant fact that 95 per cent, of the 
present settlers in the district are 
Americans. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Accidental 
Discharge 

ImpOSSlble- 
True only if it is an 

IverJ 



This is why 




The positive safety device is the exclusive patent of the Iver Johnson 
Revolver. See the lever between the hammer and the firing pin? This 
lever is raised only when the trigger is pulled, receives the blow of the 
hammer and transmits it to the firing pin. That's why you can throw 
a loaded Iver Johnson against a stone wall without fear — no discharge 
can possibly follow, as the hammer never touches the firing pin. An Iver Johnson 
never fails when you pull the trigger and never "goes off" when you don't. 

Iver Johnson Safety Automatic 

Prices— Hammer $6.50, Hammerless $7.50. 

Iver Johnsons are sold by dealers the world over, or direct from ub if your dealer won't supply 
Please send for descriptive catalogue, free upon request. It tells all about it. 
R JOHNSON'S ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS. FITCHBURG, MASS. 



Manufacturers' Agents 



CHARLES H. FOX 

Vancouver, B.C. 

MANUFACTURERS' AQENT 

8elling to the Hardware Jobbert Only. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



ALEX ANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John 8treet, Montreal 



Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



H. W. MITCHELL 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Correspondence is solicited from manufacturers 
wishing a representative in Winnipeg. 

Travellers call regularly on the wholesale and 
retail trade in Western Canada. 

Highest references and financial responsibility. 



Scott, Bathgate & Co. 

BROKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANT8 

Cor. Notre Dame St. East and Victoria St., WINNIPEG, Canada 

Storage and Warehousing a Specialty 

First-class facilities in a thoroughly modern brick ware- 
house centrally located on the railway track. 



A Straight Story 

We do not manufacture the only dependable paint on earth — but we 
manufacture one Of the best — a paint you can rely on and recommend to 
your best friends — a paint which builds up a paying trade as surely as the ebb 
and flow of the tide. 

Ark Brand Paint 

That's it. You practical business men know enough about the science of paint making to 
know that we have reached the limit of goodness in Ark Brand. There may be a better paint 
for the Canadian dealer to handle some day — Ark Brand is the best to-day. 

MURESCO WALL FINISH 

Up till now we have failed to discover a better wall finish 
than Muresco. There's nothing to equal it on the market, and 
it pays the dealer well to handle it. 




THE BENJAMIN MOORE CO.. LIMITED 

FORMERLY THE FRANCIS FROST CO., LIMITED 



New York 



TORONTO, CANADA 



Chicago 




53 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES Hardware and Metal 




OUR NAME 



on a can of Paint or Varnish means that we guarantee its good 
quality. The name "Sterling" corresponds with the Sterling stamp 
on silverware— GENUINE— THE BEST. 

A storekeeper is to be judged by the quality of the goods he 
handles. 
The best storekeepers sell "Sterling" goods. 
Do YOU sell " Sterling " Paint ? 

There is no better or more satisfactory paint made, and one dealer in your town is 
going to have the reputation of selling The Best Paint. Our representative will call upon 
you in a few days to offer a good proposition, which means so much to you that you can- 
not afford to turn it down. Kindly defer placing your Spring order until he has seen you. 

Manufactured by 

CANADIAN OIL COMPANY 

TORONTO L,M,TED 

MONTREAL ST. JOHN OTTAWA WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



THE HOUSEKEEPER'S DREAM. 

I dreamt that I dwelt in Alabastined halls, 
Alabastined ceilings, Alabastined walls, 
Where the fairies love to congregate and meet 
The air is so etherial, pure and sweet. 

Cupids and fairies will visit you at night 

In rooms, Alabastined beautiful and bright, 

From kalsomines or wall papers tainted with decay 

High on upward wing they rise and flee away. 

ALABASTINE is the only Wall Coating, which is extensively and persistently advertised to the general 
public, and is what the people call for when they want anything in the line. 

THIS IS NO DREAM 

Our publicity campaign for 1907, as planned, is sure to more than double the already large trade for 
ALABASTINE. 

Our new illustrated catalogue, " HOMES, HEATHFUL AND BEAUTIFUL" is the sensation of 
the season in the advertising line. 

Get ready to supply the large and growing demand for ALABASTINE by ordering a full assortment, 
either direct or through your nearest jobber, and DO IT NOW. 

The ALABASTINE CO., Limited, PARIS, Ont. 

54 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



BLANCHITE 



All Kinds of Preservative Paints and Enamels 
Decorative Enamels, Bath Enamels, Cold Water Paints 
Waterproof Paints, Coach Colors, and Sundries 

Our announcement is on two centre sheets. Read it and 
write us for fuller information. 

We have something out of the ordinary which has come to 
stay and we solicit enquiries from all interested in paint, before 
our travellers reach you. 



THE BLANCHITE PROCESS PAINT CO., Limited 

785 King Street West, TORONTO, CANADA 




"A rose by any other name may smell 
as sweet" 

but 

a brush by any other name would noc be 
Boeckh'S and consequently not as good. 
A good painter can't do good work unless he 
has the right kind of brushes, — you will find 
that the best painters use Boeckh'S Brushes. 

What's the inference to you as a dealer ? 
Plan isn't it? BUY BOECKH'S BRUSHES! 



UNITED FACTORIES, LIMITED 

TORONTO, CAN. 



55 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



ESTABLISHED 1798 



WILKINSON, I in MOOD 

£. CLARK, Limited 



OP LONDON, ENGLAND 



Manufacturers of 



Varnish, Paints, Colours, Etc. 




Pbasantite 

An Ideal Water Paint 



Try our celebrated specialties 

Falconite 



Lackerite 



White Enamel of High Grade Our New Varnish 

Stains, in 12 colors 



Ready Mixed Paints Petrifying Liquid 

In 3 grades, Falcon, Three Legs and Diamond For Damp Walls, Hospital Wards, etc. 



Branches and Agencies all over the World 



MONTREAL 

300 Notre Dame St. West 



ERANCIS C. REYNOLDS 

Canadian Manager 



56 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



The Long and the Short of It 



" IT" MEANS 




THE "LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and give your cus- 
tomers manv years of solid satisfaction. 

THE "SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. '{A great 
deal of time — which means a! great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERR Y (& McCOMB 

t>3 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 




ATKINS IV L £1J SAWS 

make merchandising easy. The Quality in them, backed by 
our enthusiastic publicity, has made them popular — we 
create the demand— you supply it. Easy to buy them— at 
your jobbers — or neareit branch. 



. 



E. C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Canadian Branch, 77 Adelaide St. E., TORONTO 



D.C.Mitchell & Co. 


GLASGOW 


STEEL PLATES, 


SHEETS, ANGLES, 


BARS, 


PIG IRON, 


REPRESENTATIVE 


H. G. EADIE, 


22 St. John St., MONTREAL 



McArthur, Corneille & Co. 

MONTREAL 

Glue and Gelatine 

An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . 



~^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS A CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER A SON. 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal wfaan writing. 



57 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



THE STANDARD IDEAL SANITARY CO., LIMITED 




We manufacture a complete line of 

Range-Closets, Range-Urinals, 

Lavatories 

and Sanitary Fixtures 

Suitable for Public Institutions 



Plate E. 404.— For Public Institutions, Schools, Factories, 
Asylums, &c. 



The reputation of our goods is unequalled. 

Toronto: 50 Col borne Street Montreal : 128 Craig Street West 

Winnipeg : 24 Telfer Building 

HOME OFFICE and FACTORIES: PORT HOPE, ONT. 



" Valve Quality" 
The J.M.T. Valve 




The greatest source of satisfac- 
tion to the e"g neer is probably 
a GOOD VALVE J.M.T. Valves 
are the best for all purposes- 
They're heavy and well made 
Have removable discs. 




The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Limited 



Manufacturers of the largest varieties 
of Steam Coods in the Dominion. 



93-97 West Adelaide St. 

TORONTO 



58 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Plumbing and Steamfitting 



BRANCH VENTILATING PIPES. 

The increasing efficiency ol sanitar] 
plumbing work during recenl years, and 
the different methods pi guarding against 
the escape of foul ail from soil and 
waste pipes which have been introduced 
iiv various inventors and patentees, have 

been the eause of mueh discussion 

among those who advise and direct the 

work and those who have to find the 
money for carrying it out. 

It was many years before the public 
in general, and architects in particular, 
could be persuaded that it was neces- 
sary to fix taps in all waste pipes im- 
mediately under the fittings, whether 
they were baths, sinks, or lavatory 
bas'ins, in order to prevent the foul air 
from the waste pipes finding its way in- 
to the apartments in which these fittings 
were situated. It was supposed thai if 
the waste pipe discharged over a gulley 
trap, however foul this may have been, 
the trap in the waste pipe was not 
merely unnecessary, but a thing to be 
avoided. Some, indeed, maintain that 
traps in waste pipes are a 'serious ob- 
struction, and describe them as minia- 
ture cesspools, while they leave out of 
account the much larger cesspool, which 
in many cases is so constructed is to 
accumulate tilth in a dangerous manner. 
And, strange to say, the local sanitary 
authorities in many places supported the 
idea, and actually prohibited the use of 
traps in the waste pipes. Such a state 
of things, is, however slowly passing 
away, and in the modern sanitary by- 
laws there are clauses which insist up- 
on the fixing of self-cleansing traps in 
every waste pipe. Moreover, every 
branch waste pipe near the trap Lis to 
be titled with a branch ventilating pipe. 
or "puff pipe" as it is sometimes call- 
ed, leading to external air. This is re- 
garded by many people as unnecessary 
extravagance. And it must be acknow- 
ledged that under some circumstances 
such a branch ventilating pipe is not 
really required for retaining the water 
seal of the trap. 

In the case of short waste pipes in 
connection with tlat bottom sinks which 
are fitted with a waste grating, and not 
with a plug waste, the necessity does 
not arise. But where there are several 
lit tings on various floors on one waste 
pipe every trap must be provided with 
a branch ventilating pipe in order to 
preserve the water seal from syphonage, 
and the local sanitary authority is act- 
ing within its rights in insisting on this 
regulation being carried out. But the 
point is, have the sanitary authority 
power to go beyond the letter and spirit 
of the by-laws and insist on the branch- 
ventilating pipes being connected to one 
main ventilating pipe, and either car- 
ried above the roof or connected with 
the upper end of the main waste pipe, 
and treated in the same way as an anti- 
syphonage pipe in connection with a 
stack of soil pipe ? This, we under- 
stand, is being demanded in several in- 
stances, particularly in blocks or resi- 
dential Hats, and, even if it were desir- 
able, has the sanitary authority the 



power to enforce it , if i! is not pro\ id- 
ea for in i he by-lav s ? Then, if h i 
done, surely the grating over the gulley 
into which the mam waste pipe dis- 
charges should be closed also, because 
there must be a much larger volume of 
foul air escape from this grating than 
is likely to issue from the ends of the 
small blanch Ventilating pipes. 

A st ill more inipoi tanl point is thai , 
if it is necessary to provide as complete 
,1 fresh air break as possible between 
the lit tings and the drains, then the 
shorter length of ventilating pipe to the 



open air the Del ler, beside I he impoi 1 
ance of having an open grating over the 
gulley at the iool ol the waste pipe. 

The whole content ion of joining-up 
hunch vents is to .1 large extenl based 
on ,1 misconception, Eoi ii can be shown 
by experiment thai instead of the vents 
discharging ail from Hie waste pip. 
the face of the wall, where I hr\ termin- 
ate, thej .lie in, iiiy always acting as 
air inlets, supplying air to the main 
waste and ventilating pipe which I 
lied above tie roof.— English Plumbers' 
Review, 



CLOSET CONNECTIONS TO SOIL PIPE STACK 



[Two more letters sent in replying to the question, the prize-winning answer to 
. which was published in HARDWARE AND METAL of December 29.) 



The 
to our 
explan 
the de 
panied 

The 



letters 
query 

itory, 

cided 
by an 

letter 



published to-day in answer 
re break syphons, are self- 
t hiit by Mr. Ross having 
idvantage of being aeeom- 
illustratioh. 
by Mr. Julien contains 



/ 




D. G FT 0.5 5 



\ 



many good arguments, though we cannot 
agree that under all circumstances a 
job fitted throughout with pot traps 
without vents would he perfectly sani- 
tary. 

Connection Not Necessary. 
In my opinion it is not necessary that 
every closet connection to soil pipe stack 

69 



should be lilted with a break syphon. 
l p to d, ite .mil more sanitary plumbing 
goods are now on Hie market which 
makes it unnecessary for these break 
syphons to be used. The centrifugal lead 
trap is absolutely non-sy phasing and 
self-cleansing and does away with the 
vent. There is a disadvantage too where 
these air vents have been put in, tor 
sooner or later 1he\ become choked up. 
thus causing great inconvenience. If an 
up-to-date closet is being fixed, the 
space between bowl and soil pipe 
would be about IN inches, and a 1-inch 
lead bend would connect the two. On 
the accompanying sketch it will he at 
once seen why a break syphon is un- 
necessary. The closet cannot syphon, 
for when it is Hushed the discharge of 
water is not sufficient to lill the short 
length of pipe or bend used, and the 
quantity of foul air between bowl and 
soil pipe stack is reduced to a mini- 
mum. 

1). (i. Ross. Winnipeg. 

I consider that no back vent should he 
put to closets, when no more than three 
feet from stack, or even longer, for a 
horizontal run of 1-ineh pipe is never 
filled with the rush of water from a 
closet, hence cannot he syphoned, And, 
as the closet is always put near the 
stack, I am convinced that no back vent 
is necessary. 1 will go still further re 
back veins ; I would call a job perfect 
if it was done with pol traps. 

Do away with hack vents, as in large 
cities. Many people leave their homes 
for the country, and when they come 
back they find that their house is filled 
with sewer gas. There is not much seal 
in the ordinary trap, with so much cir- 
culation of air through the main stack 
and back vent, Hut it evaporates the 
water from said trap. 

These are mj persona] vie's-s oi mod- 
ern plumbing, as done in our city at 
present . 

(ill.. JULIEN, Ottawa. 



Pull down the show window blinds 
and your clerks can all take a rest. 

The merchant who makes money does 
it bv close attention to busim 



PLUMBING AND ST E A M F I TT I N G 



Hardware and Metal 



QUALITIES OF A GOOD SALESMAN 

R. T. CRANE, in ihe Valve World. 



Some people Beem to believe that a 
good salesman is one who is able 
to deceive, humbug, cheat and do 
Fraud the buyer, and this, aside Erom 
the question ot morality, and consider 
ed only from the money making point ol 
view, ma\ lie true where the business is 
such that the seller docs not expect to 
meet 01 sell to the same person a second 
tune. We claim, however, that any 
enterprise which is conducted in that 
manner is not entitled to the dignity ot 
being classed as a business, tor it is 
nothing more than a swindle. 

We maintain that in an ordinary busi- 
il is not good policy lor salesmen 
to practice the slightest deception, and 
one of the lust things that we require 
of our men is that tney shall be abso- 
lutely honest, frank, and fair in their 
treatment of our customers. We think 
the value to a salesman of having these 
qualities appear in his every feature and 
action and suggested by every word that 
he utters cannot be overestimated. 

Every purchaser is, we believe, desir- 
ous of dealing with a house that sup- 
plies honest goods at honest prices, that 
carries stocks in sutficient variety and 
quantity to take care of his require- 
ments without delay, and where he can 
be sure of always obtaining the same 
line of goods. 

It is a great relief to a buyer when he 
linds such a concern, and he should at 
once see that it is to his interest to 
confine his dealings to that house, as 
he is usually so fully occupied in look- 
ing after the other portions of his work 
that he cannot afford to spend his time 
endeavoring to ascertain whether he has 
been defrauded either in the quality of 
goods or in prices. 

Trade Only With Reliable Firms. 

From our own experience, we know it 
is a great satisfaction, when purchas- 
ing goods, to feel that we are dealing 
with a house having such a reputation. 
In fact, w T e have made it a rule to trade 
only with concerns of that kind. 

For a firm to gain and maintain a 
reputation for fair dealing, it is not 
enough for the firm itself to be honest, 
but the policy of the house must be re- 
flected by the salesmen, who, in many 
cases, are the only persons connected 
with the firm the trade ever meet. 
Hence the importance of having sales- 
men of good character, who, in solicit- 
ing business, make only such statements 
as the house can live up to. It is ap- 
parent, therefore, that an honest con- 
cern cannot afford to employ untruthful 
salesmen, as nothing will cause it great- 
er injury than to have such men out 
among the trade. 

On the other hand, a house selling in- 
ferior goods needs salesmen who can and 
will lie sufficiently to conceal the in- 
feriority beneath a cloak of plausible 
phrases. Therefore, when we find 
by experience a salesman whose 
statements are always correct, 

and who will not stoop to 
misrepresentation, we are convinced 
that his house in honest and reliable, 
and are disposed to give him our busi- 
ness. 

For a salesman to impress Ihe trade 
in this way involves something more 
than simply retraining from lying. He 
must confine himself to what he knows 



to be true, neither deliberately lying, 
nor mixing up guesses opinions and facts 
in such a way as to deceive or mislead 

the customer, who, alter having disco\ 
red a deception, can rarely be sold to 

again bj the salesman, with the I 
that the house loses a customer. 

Salesmen Must Know Goods. 

\lai.\ salesmen are apt to be slovenly 
and careless in their replies to ques- 
tions, sometimes possibly with the in- 
tention to deceive, but probably main 
more times for the purpose of conceal 
ing their ignorance on the subject about 
which they are questioned. This is a 
practice that we most strongly con- 
demn. We very much prefer that our 
men shall acknowledge their ignorance 
to the customer and suggest to him that 
In apply to the house for information, 
if the matter is of sufficient importance 
to take that trouble. While salesmen 
are not expected to give customers un- 
usual or technical information, still it 
is exceedingly desirable that they should 
have an extensive knowledge of the 
goods they are handling so as to be 
able to describe their goods and answer 
questions likely to be asked. 

Occasionally a salesman is asked his 
opinion as to market conditions. Our 
salesmen arc instructed not to give any 
opinion in the matter of prospective 
rise or fall in prices, as in our judgment 
salesmen are not in a position to be 
reliably informed as to the prospective 
trend of prices, and we cannot afford to 
have them deceive or mislead the trade 
in this \va\ . .*..., more than we can af- 
ford to have them misrepresent the 
quality of our goods. In any event, we 
do not care to encourage our customers 
to gamble on the market. However, 
if customers have contracts on which 
they would stand to suffer loss if prices 
were advanced, we feel that it w T ould 
not be at all improper for our salesmen 
as a matter of safety to the customers, 
to recommend that they place orders to 
cover such contracts. 

Cut Out Treating Habit. 

One mistake that salesmen frequently 
make is to urge an audience with a man 
when he is busy, thereby annoying him 
so that he will not give them a proper 
reception. Besides being tactful, it goes 
without saying that salesmen should 
be men of good address and affable in 
manner. 

Another feature of the subject which 
some of the older people in business will 
remember was a common practice in 
the past, was the custom of drinking 
and carousing with customers. In those 
times some dealers kept a bar in their 
stores, others would have jugs or bot- 
tles of whisky on hand for their custom- 
ers, and it was looked upon as being 
rather necessary for salesmen to take 
people out and entertain them by drink- 
ing and carousing with them in order 
to hold their trade. 

We are pleased to be able to state 
that this practice has almost totally 
disappeared, business now being tran- 
sacted more strictly on the basis of 
merit than was formerly the case. We 
laid down the rule years ago that if a 
man's trade could not be obtained with- 
out having our salesmen dissipate with 
him, we did not want it at all. 



ATTRACTIVE ANNIVERSARY 
NUMBER. 
The Plumbers' Trade Journal of New 
York have issued a very attractive an- 
niversary ami holiday number, dated 
January 1st, this being the first issue 

ot their forty-firs! year. The book 

comprises 132 pages "1' Well gotten up 

reading and advertising matter, [num- 
erable illustrations being given to il- 
Jusliale the remarkable ^development 
of the plumbing and heating trades 
during the lifetime of the paper. To 
lead the various articles and study (he 
illustrations showing the first buildings 
occupied by industries which are now- 
known to Ihe trade throughout the en- 
tire world is very instructive, the ac- 
companying reading matter being also 
very interesting, showing the lack of 
sanitary conveniences a quarter of a 
century ago and the wonderful improve- 
ments which have been made since that, 
time. An interesting article to Can- 
adians as well as to the plumbers across 
the line is one entitled "A Universal 
Plumbing Code," by Herbert F. 
Shade. Victoria, B.C., which we will 
reproduce in a coining issue of Hard- 
ware and Metal. The publishers are 
to be congratulated on the excellence 
of their anniversary issue. 



PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Catalogue B, for 1907, of the United 
lirass Manufacturing Company, Cleve- 
land, Ohio, has just been issued to the 
trade, it being 7x9 inches, containing 
about 200 pages fully illustrated of 
their many different lines for water, 
gas and steam, also all supplies for 
bath-room and hot water heating. This 
catalogue will no doubt be found of 
great value to hardware and plumbing 
merchants, as the complete lines manu- 
factured by this firm, fully illustrated, 
will be an invaluable aid in ordering 
goods, and will be sent to any merchant 
interested in these goods, by writing, 
mentioning this paper. 

NEW SHOP AT HAILEYBURY. 

C. A. McKane & Co. have opened a 
plumbing, hot water and steam heating 
shop at Haileybury. Mr. McKane was 
formerly in business at. Newmarket 
and prior to that time with the Office 
Specialty Manufacturing Co., and con- 
nected with the plumbing and heating 
trades in Toronto. He should find a 
good opening for his energies in the 
rapidly developing north country. Mr. 
McKane was a caller on Hardware and 

Metal in Toronto on Tuesday, being 

now engaged in buying his stocks of 
material for Ihe coming season. 

PLUMBING FAILURE. 

The Thorn Plumbing Co., of Toronto 
has been wound up on the application ot 
the (iurney Foundrj Co., who arc credit- 
ors to the extent of $1,069. The com- 
panj was incorporated in October. 1905, 
with a nominal capital of $20,000. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Plumbing Markets 



TORONTO. 

Office of Hardware «nd Metal, 
10 Front Street East. 

Toronto, January 11, 1S07 

For some weeks we have been look- 
ing for an advance on hot water and 
steam boilers owing to- the big jumps 

which have taken place in the pig iron 
market since the last changes were made 
on boiler quotations. Higher prices are 
certainly warranted by the condition of 
the iron market, but events during the 
past week have made it practically cer- 
tain that present prices will continue 
unchanged for some time to come. 

As predicted by us a month ago, an 
advance of about 10 per cent, has been 
announced on enamelware ; the new dis- 
counts on various lines being quoted be- 
low. The condition of the iron market 
warrants higher prices, and the ad- 
vanced prices will undoubtedly hold 
firm during the coming season, as all 
foundries find it difficult to secure 
stocks of iron owing to the mills and 
furnaces being booked so far ahead with 
orders. 

Iron pipe has also been subject to 
several changes. The new list issued 
this week of sizes up to 2 1-2 inches, 
shows an advance, while quotations on 
larger sizes are also revised. Still an- 
other change is in straps and bends, the 
discount on which has been reduced to 
■10 per cent. There is also talk of an- 
other advance in cast iron fittings. 

As is to be expected at this season, 
trade in both plumbing and heating sup- 
plies is none too active. In anticipation, 
however, of advanced prices, many 
plumbers are booking their orders ahead 
for Spring delivery. ■• 

LEAD PIPE — The discount on lead 
pipe continues at 5 per cent, off the list 
price of 7c. per pound. Lead waste, 8c. 
per pound with 5 off. Caulking lead 
•") 3-4c. to 6c. per pound. Traps and 
bends, 40 per cent., discount. 
.SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. -New- 
lists will show advances as follows : 
Medium and extra heavy pipe and fit- 
tings, 60 per cent. ; light pipe 50 per 
cent.; light fittings, 50 and 10 per cent.; 
7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 per cent. 

IRON PIPE.— New lists show advances 
on all lines up to 2i inches. 1-inch black 
pipe is quoted at $4.95, and one-inch 
galvanized at $6.60. Full list in cur- 
rent market quotations. 

IRON PIPE FITTINGS — New 
lists are as follows : Cast iron el- 
bows, tees, crosses, etc., 62J per cent.; 
cast iron plugs and bushings, 62£ per 
cent.; flange unions, 62£ per cent.; nip- 
ples, 70 and 10 per cent.; iron cocks, 55 
and 5 per cent.; Canadian malleable, 30 
per cent.; malleable unions, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; malleable bushings, 55 uercent.; 
cast iron ceiling plates, plain 65 per 



cent.; cast iron floor, 70 per cent.; hook 
plates, 60 per cent.; expansion plates, 
65 per cent.; headers, fid per cent, hang- 
ers, 65 per cent.; standard list. 

(JALVANIZED IRON RANGE BOIL 
MRS — We quote: 12 gallon capacity, stan- 
dard, $4.50; extra heavy, $6.50 ; 18 
gallon standard, $4.75 ; extra heavy, 
$6.75 ; 24 gallon, standard, $4.75; ex- 
tra heavy, $6.75; 30 gallon, standard, 
$4.75 ; extra heavy, $7.50; 35 gallon, 
standard, $5.75; extra heavy, $8.50; 40 
gallon, standard, $6.75; 40 gallon, ex- 
tra heavy, $9.50; 52 gallon, $11; ex- 
tra heavy, $14; 66 gallon, standard, 
$18; extra heavy, $20 ; 82 gallon, 
standard, $21; extra heavy, $24 ; 100 
gallon, standard, $29; extra heavy, $34; 
120 gallon, standard, $34; extra heavy, 
$40; 144 gallon, standard, $47 ; extra 
heavy, $55. Copper range boilers are 
now net list. 

RADIATORS— Prices are very stiff at: 
Hct water, 47-J per cent.; steam, 50 per 
cent.; wall radiators, 45 per cent.; 
specials, 45 per cent. Hot water boil- 
ers are still subject to unchanged prices 
in spite of heavy advances on foundry 
iron. 

SOLDER — Quotations remain firm 
as follows: Bar solder, half-and- 
half, guaranteed, 27c.; wiping, 23c. 

ENAMELWARE^New lists on enam- 
eled baths issued by the Standard Ideal 
Company on Jan. 3, show a 10 per cent, 
advance. Lavatories, first quality, 20 
and 5 to 20 and 10 off ; special, 20 and 
10 to 30 and 2J per cent, discount. Kit- 
chen sinks, plate 300, firsts 60 and 10 
off ; specials. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Urinals and range closets, 15 off. Fit- 
tings extra. 

MONTREAL. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, January 11, 1907. 

General business is excellent. Whole- 
salers report that the way business has 
kept up lately is something wonderful 
and heretofore practically unknown. 

The expected advance in iron pipe is 
no longer a thing of the future — it has 
arrived. 

RANGE BOILERS— Following prices 
are well maintained : Iron clad, 30 gal- 
lon, $5 ; 40 gallon, $6.50 net list. Cop- 
per, 30 gallon, $25 ; 35 gallon, $29.50; 
40 gallon, $32 net. 

LEAD PIPE— Remains firm. We 
still quote 5 per cent. discount 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, St. John, 
N.B., Halifax : f.o.b., London, 15c per 
hundred lbs extra; f.o.b. Hamilton, 10c 
per hundred lbs. extra. 

IRON PIPE FITTINGS— The usual 
trade is being done at unchanged prices, 
we quote : Discounts on nipples, 1-4 inch 
to 3 inch, 75 per cent., 31/2 inch to 2 
inch, 55 per cent. 

IRON PIPE— Supplies are still short 
and the looked-for advance has arrived. 
Standard pipe in lots of 100 feet, 
regular lengths, 1-4 inch, t $5.50 ; 3-8 

61 



inch, $5.50 ; 1-2 inch, $8 51 
inch, 11.5(1 , I inch, J16.50 ; I 1-1 
inches, $22.50 ; 1 1-2 inches, $27.00 
2 inches, 836.50, discount! on 

pipe, ,] UlCb, •")') per cent . ; £ 

inch, 56 pei eenl '. inch, ijh per 
cent,.; Discounts on galvanized pipe: 1-4 

inch, 1 1 per '-''iii .; g inch, 11 per 1 

>-■ pel 'iiit.. J to 2 inch, do 
per cent. Extra heavy pipe of 
100 feet lot ., ai e quoted a > fol 
lows: L-2 inch, $12; 3-1 inch, $15; l 
inch, $22; 1 1-1 inches r $30; 1 L-2 inches, 
1 inches, +50. The discounts on 
black pip' 1 . I inch. , 1 pei cent ; g inch, 

(i!t per cent.; \ inch to 2 inches, 68 per 

cent. Galvanized, I inch, '>'.) per cent ,; 
g inch, 69 per cent.; \ to 2 inches 58 pei 
cent. 

SOIL PIPE .WD FITTINGS Our 

prices remain as follows: Standard 
soil pipe, 50 per cent. off list. 
Standard fittings, 50 and 10 per cent, off 
list; medium and extra heavy soil pipe. 
60 per cent. off. Fittings, 60 per cent, 
off. 

SOLDER— Prices remain the same 
Bar solder, half-and-half, guaranteed 

25c; No. 2 wiping solder, 22c. 

ENAMELWAKK. New list issued on 
Jan. 3 on Canadian ware shows an ad- 
vance of 10 per cent. Lavatories, dis- 
counts, 1st quality, 30 per rent..; spec- 
ial, 30 and 10 per cent. Sinks, 1 - 
inch, flat rim, 1st quality, $2.60, 
special. $2.45. 



ATTRACTIVE DESK DECORATION. 

Chill' Bros., Toronto, selling agents 
for Warden King & Sun. .Montreal. 
have supplied their customers with a 
very attractive article for desk decora- 
tion in the form of an artistically 
printed and framed quotation "I' 
Billings. It is printed in several col- 
ors, and contains very valuable tables 
on the back, giving capacities, di 
sions and price list of the Daisy Boi 
Water Boiler. It will be appreciated 
by every steam fitter or hardware mer- 
chant who receives a copy. Any who 
have not already received one should 
forward their name to ( luff Bros, al 
once before the supply is exhausted. 
Along with the desk decoration goes 
a neatly printed souvenir card wishing 
the trade a prosperous New Year. 

TAYLOR FAMILY REUNION. 
For the first time in many years the 
five Taylor brothers, ;iil of whom are 
well known to the hardware trade 
throughout Canada, mel in Toronto and 
celebrated their reunion by a dinner 
at the King Edward Hotel on Tuesday. 
The five brothers are: Jos. W. Taylor. 
heating engineer, Johannesburg, South 
Africa; W. W. Taylor, with Pierce. But- 
ler & Pierce of Syracuse, X.Y.. probab- 
ly America's Largest plumbing and 
heating engineers; John M. Taylor, and 
Adam Taylor, president and secretary 
respectively of the Taylor, Forbes 
Company, of Guelph, manufacturei 
Sovereign Hot Wain I'oileis and 
Radiators, and James F Taylor. To- 
ronto, a director of the Taylor, F< 
Company. 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



THE NEW 

"SOLID-ADJUSTABLE" 
HAND STOCK AND DIES 




At prices that will warrant your 
Inquiries. 

I. E. SHANTZ & CO. 



BERLIN, 



ONTARIO 



Selling Agents for Canada 




This is the Mark that 
Means Something 

li is the distinctive brand of genuine Armstrong 
Stocks and Die and Pipe Fitters' Tools. 

No "Armstrong pattern" or " iust as good as 
Armstrong" have this stamp. Don"t buy anything 
in this line that hasn't this brand as it is the mark 
of genuineness. 

THE ARMSTRONG MANUFACTURING CO. 

292 Knowlton Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 




YOUR WANTS IN ENAMELWARE 

that I might prove slow deliveries are no part 
of my business. 

It would pay you to test my claims for 
promptitude. 



ORLANDO VICKERY 

178-180 Victoria Street TORONTO, CANADA 



" Diamond Brand " Fittings 

are proclaimed the best by prac- 
tical men— and they should know. 

The Material is first-class— The Threads just right and the Finish 

as Smooth as can be. 

OSHAWA STEAM & GAS FITTINGS CO., 

OSHAWA, CANADA 



LIMITED 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 



To be obtained from the principal Dealers in Glass. Hardware, and Painters' Supplies 



Contractors to H. M. Government and the principal English Sheet and Plate Glass 

Works 



' I ' *°y»' World's Best Cutlery 

^a^^ ^^J-^j You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

^ JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS, Limited 

^"flNTED »" when ordering cutlery. A reputation of over 200 years 

at stake, insures the quality of every article. 

Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HU7T0N & COMPANY, MONTREAL 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 




goes with every MERI1KM, PORTABLE HANI) 
MACHINE. PIPE THREADING and CUTTING 
MACHINE. We build them that way. 

For doing all kinds of threading— under ALL con- 
ditions— labor trouble and faulty material included 
—where speed, durability and ease of control count 
f i r something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. 

Whether it be stationary or portable — hand or 
power driven— 30 DAYS FREE TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your choice should be the 
MERRELL. 

Thin Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-off Knife. 

Let us tell you more about this machine— The 
Chasers, Vise and the large range of work covered. 



Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

CANADIAN FAIRBANKS GO. 

Sole Agents for Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



THE 




When You Buy I 
Demand Proof I 



Don't take any substitute for 
Glauber Bras9 goods. Make the 
salesman show you. Brass has 
gone up no less than fifteen per 
cent., and if you don't get proofs 
before you buy you take chances 
of getting something less than 
you pay for. 

WE GIVE YOU THE PROOF 
and 2 Cocks Free for any 
one sent you defective. 



§ Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., j 

S Expert Makers of Plumbers' Fine Brass Goods 

1 CLEVELAND, 0. 



Forwell Foundry Co. 

BERLIN. ONT. 

Manufacturers ot 

SOIL PIPE, FITTINGS, and CAST IRON SINKS 

Ask Jobbers for » F. F. CO." ■«»n<l 



62 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



THINK A MOMENT WHAT 
THIS HEANS TO YOU 



The Daisy Hot Water Boiler, a heater 
of unequalled popularity, and of 
unquestioned merit, always waiting 
your command. Every size and style 
kept in stock for immediate ship- 
ment. You realize what that means 
to you at this season of the year. 




The House of Cluff Brothers 

Selling Agents for 
WARDEN KING & SON, Limited, = - Lombard Street, TORONTO 



Strictly Brand 



IS A FAVORITE 



Solder 



ft 




71 



Specialty <* 
PACKED by 

THE CANADA METAL CO., Toronto 



63 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



••The Best on Earth 





Fairbanks 

Brass 

Valves 



v Simplest renewable features 

Highest grade steam metal 
Perfect construction 




Horse Shoers' Foot Vise 
and Bolt Header 



COMPLETE STOCK 



I The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Limited 

1 "-"•' T ™" — "--' 




j 



A Practical Tool and a Time-saver for the Busy 
Blacksmith 

Manufactured by 

THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., 

LONDON, CANADA 



Limited 




The Ever Ready 
Dry Battery 

FOR AUTOMOBILE and 



GASOLINE ENGINE USE 

Write for Prices 

JOHN FORM AN 

248 and 250 Craig St. W., MONTREAL, - Que. 




HOTTEST ON EARTH 



The No. 8 Alcohol Blow Pipe produces nearly 
3000 F. Will do lead burning on storage 
batteries. Produces a needle blue flame pointed. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 
Jobbers sell at factory price, $9.75 net. 

THE TURNER BRASS WORKS 

53 MICHICAN STREET, CHICACO, U.8.A. 



64 




Kerr's Standard and 
Jenkin Disc Radiator Valves 

are perfectly constructed, and of beauti- 
ful design. Like all " Kerr" specialties, 
strictly high-grade 

The KERR ENGINE CO., 

Manufacturers LlmiUd 



WALKERVILLE 



ONTARIO 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 




MUELLER 
COMPRESSION SILL COCKS 




Body threads engage all the stem 
threads during compression. Stem will 
not chatter or work loose on account 'of 
premature wear of top thread. Tee or 
wheel handle or loose key, straight or 
bent nose. 



UNCONDITIONAL )| H ^ M (l G U A R A N T 



H. MUELLER MFG. CO. 



Decatur, HI., U.S.A. 



New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 



Hardware and Plumber— 




We have pumps duit- 
able to any demand mnse 
upon you by most exatc 
ing customers. 

Our pumps will do 
anything that a pump 
can do, and we will be 
pleased to give the 
benefit of many years' 
experience to any one 
having pump troubles. 

McDougall Pumps are 
Standard Pumps, and 
with us it is quality first, 
last and always, while we 
ask just as little money 
as we can get along with. 

We have a few catalogues 
tor distribution 



The R. McDougall Co., Limited 



CALT, - CANADA 



65 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ft If IT TAKINP PHANPF^ ^ ou can '* carry on any kind of business campaign to a 
I^UI I I MAI li U UnrlllUtO successful issue — unless you are certain about your base of 
supplies. When you place an order with us you take out an insurance policy guaranteeing success. 
Quality — trade-building quality is stamped through and through our 
READY ROOFING, TARRED FELTS, SHEATHING, WRAPPING AND BUILDING PAPERS 



These are our brands 

BLACK DIAMOND" 

>W "JOLIETTE" 

^B?^flfc> AND and 

^%ASjr "cyclone" 

TARRED FELT SHEATH.NO 



QUALITY and PRICE always right 

ALEX, fie ARTHUR & CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



8a ncQILL STREET 



F. J. C. COX, Winnipeg, Sole Agent for Northwest Provinces. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. 11, 1907. 
Thf»e prices are for such qualities ami 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 



IETALS. 



ANTIMONY. 

Hallett's per lb. . . 271 



28 



BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned. \ 25 per cent, off list. 

Spun I 

BABBIT METAL. 
Canada Metal Company— Imoeri»l.genuine, 
60c.; Imperial Tough. 6&c; White Brass 50c: 
MetaUic. 35c ; Ha-ris Heavy Pressure, 25c ; 
Hercules, 25c : Wnite Bronze, 15c; Star 
Frictionless, 14c; Alluminoid, 10c; No. 4, 
9c per lb. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, net list. 

SheeU, 12tollin 27 

Tubing, base, per lb r -16 to 2 in ... . 33 
Tubing, J to 3 inch, iron pipe size . . 33 

1 to 3-inch, seamless 40 

Copper tubiog, 5 cetts extra. 
COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lots 2S 50 26 00 

Bars. 

Cut lengths, round, I to 2 in 32 00 

Sheet. 
Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 .... 30 00 

Plain. 14 oz 3100 

Tinned copper sheet, base «US 

Planished base 37 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). »x6 ft., 25 
to 30 lb. each, per lb., base 30 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 



8 to 10 gauge 2 60 

12 gauge 2 60 



14 
17 
18 
20 
22 
24 
26 
28 



2 60 
2 40 
2 40 
2 40 
2 40 
2 45 
2 55 
2 60 



CANADA PLATES. 



Ordinary, 52 sheets 

All bright " 

Galvanized Canada Plat es,52 sheets 
" 60 " 



2 60 
2 65 
2 60 
2 50 
2 55 
2 53 
2 70 
2 75 
2 85 
310 



3 00 

4 01 
4 35 
4 60 



Comet 

16 to 20 gauge 3 60 

22 to 24 gauge 3 75 

26 " 4 30 

28 " 4 45 



Less than case lots 10 to 25c extra. 

IRON AND STEEL. 
Montreal. 
Common bar, per 100 lb 2 15 



Queen's 
Head. Bell. 
3 75 .... 

3 90 .... 

4 45 
4 60 



4 45 



Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 
Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown. 

16 to 20 gauge 3 60 3 95 

22 to 24 gauge 3 95 4 00 

26 " •• 4 3J 4 20 

•l» " . . 4 45 4 50 

Apollo. 

10J oz. (American gauge) 4 70 

28 gauge " 4 45 

2« " " 4 15 

24 " " 3 9 J 



Forged iron " 2 40 

Refined " " 2 55 

Horseshoe iron " 2 55 

Hoop steel, 11 to 3 in. base 

Sleigh shoe steel " 2 85 

Tire steel 2 40 

Best Bheet caststeel 

B. K. Morton "Alpha" high speed. 

" annealed 

'"M" Self-hardening 

"J" quality, bestwarranted .... 

"I" " warranted 

"B.C" quality 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel 10 

"Novo" 

11 annealed .... 

Jowett&SonsB.P.L. tool steel 

INGOT TIN. 
I.amb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. 846 
TIN PLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley— 

10,14 x 20 base 

IX. 14x20 " 

1XX, 14x20 base 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

10, 14x20 base 

1 X. 14x20 " .... 

I XX, 14x20 base 

Raveu and Vulture Grades— 

I C, 14 x 20 base 

IX " 

IX X " 

IX X X " 

"Dominion Crown Best "—Double 

Coated, Tissued. 

I C, 14x20 base 

IX, 14x20 " 

IXX, 14x20" 

"Af.away'8 Best "—Standard Quality. 

I C, 14 x 20 base 

IX. 14x20 

'I XX, 14x20 " 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O., 14 x20 base 

20x28, double box 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 

IX., Terne Tin 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs 
" 14x60, '' 
" 14x65, 

Tinned Sheets 



Toronto- 
2 30 

2 70 
2 70 
2 80 
2 30 
2 50 
12 
65 
70 
50 
18 
14 
09 
20 
65 
65 
101 



50 847 00 



Per box. 
$6 50 

8 00 

9 50 

6 50 

8 00 

9 50 

5 00 

6 00 

7 00 

8 00 

Per box. 

5 75 

6 75 

7 75 

4 50 

5 2b 

6 00 



4 25 

8 50 



8 00 

9 50 



ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 7 25 7 50 

Domestic 7 00 7 25 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 

BRASS GOODS, VALVE", ETC. 

Standard Compression work, dis half inth 50 
per cent., others 40 per cent. 

Cushion work, discount 4J per cent. 

Fuller work, 1-inch CO per cent., others 50 p.c. 

Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 50 
per ce t. ; roundway, 45 per cent. 

J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 50 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves 
discount 52} per cent. 

Kerr standard globes, angles and checks, 
speoial, 421 per cent.; standard, 471 pc 

Kerr Jenkins' disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, 45 per cent. 

Kerr steam radiator valves 60 p.c, and quick- 
opening hot-water radiator valves, 60 p.c. 

Kerr brass, Weber's straightway valves, 
421 per cent. ; straightway valves, I. B.B.M., 
60 per cent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves, discount 50 per cent 

Standard Radiator Valves, 60 per cent. 

Patent Quick -Opening Valves. 65 per cent. 

Jenkins' Bros. Globe Angle and Check Valves 
discount 321 per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No7Fuller's '.' 2 25 

No. 4}, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold, per dci.., $16.20 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 50 per cent . 
11 " iron ** " 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-rest Machine $25.00 



LEAD PIPE 



'}- 



8 50 

9 on 



7^x30 up tc 24 gauge. 
« 26 " 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 5 40 5 50 

Bar, " 5 75 6 00 

Sheets, 21 lb. Bq. ft., by roll 06} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets ic. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c 
per lb. and 5 p.c dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8ft lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 8 00 8 25 

Part casks 8 25 8 50 



Lead Pipe, 7c. per pound, 5 per cent. off. 
Lead waste, 8c per pound, 5 per cent. off. 
Caulking lead, 6c per pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 



BOILERS— COPPER RANGE 

Coppe\ 30 gallon 25 00 

'• 35 " 29 00 

" 40 " 33 00 

Net list. 



BOILERS— GALVANIZED IRON RANGE. 

Capacity. Standard. Extra heavy 

30-gallons ... 4.75 7.50 

35 " „.. 5.75 8'50 

40 " .... 6.75 3.50 

2 per cent., 30 days 

BATH TUBS. 

Steel clad copper lined, 15 per cent. 

CAST IRON SINKS. 

16x24, 81; 18x30, SI; 18x36, 81.3). 

ENAMELED CLOSETS AND URINALS 

Discount 15 per cent. 

ENAMELED BATHS. 

List i ' ued by the Standard Ideal Com- 
pany Jan. 3. 1907. show* an advance of 10 per 
cent, over previous quotations. 

ENAMELED LAVATORIES. 

Id 'I'mlity. Special. 
Plate E 100 to E 103 . 2n & 5 D.O. 20 & 10 p 0, 

" E 104 to E 132.... 20 & 10 p.c. 30 & 2i p.c. 

E-'AMELKD KOI. I. RIM SINKS. 

1st quality. Special. 
Plate E 2U1, one piece 15 & 21 p.c. 15 ilOp.c. 

E-.iMKU.ll) kllCHLN KINKS. 

Plate E, flat iron 300, 60 & 10 p.c 65 4 5 p.c. 



IRON PIPE. 



Size (per 100 ft.) 
} inch 



Galvanized 

3 08 

3 08 

3 57 

4 60 

6 6tl 

9 00 

10 80 

14 40 

28 00 

36 50 

45 00 

52 50 



Black. 

2 25 i inch. 

2 25 | " . 

2 32 } " . 

3 45 J " . 

4 95 1 " . 
6 75 1} » . 
8 10 lj " , 

IC 80 2 " , 
20 00 21 " 
26 00 3 " . 
33 00 3J " 
37 00 4 " , 
2 per cent. 30 days. 
Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 30 per 

cent.; American discount 25 per cent. 
Cast Iron Fittings 621 ! Standard bushings 621 
per cent.; headers. 60 ; flanged unions 62' . 
malleable bushings 55 ; ninnies, up to 2 
in.. 70 a^d 10 per cent ; up to 6 in., 65 
per cent.; malleable lipped unions, 55 and 
5 per cent. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, 

up to 6 io» h, dircount 60 pe; cent. 
7 and 8-iri. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 
Light pipe, 50 p c. ; fittings, 50 and 10 p.c. 
OAKUM. 

Plumbers ....per 10J lb 4 00 4 75 

RADIATOR", ETC. 

Hot water 47% p.c. 

8team 50 p.c. 

Wall Radiators and Specials 45 p.c. 

STOVES, BOILERS, FURNACES, REGISTERS. 

Discounts vary from 40 to 70 per cent, 
according to list. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

}-lb per lb. .. 

lib. or over " 

SOLDER. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 25 27 
Wiping 22 21 



37 

34 

Per lb. 



PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins, pure 08 

Chrome yellow — 15 

Golden ochre " .... 08 

French " " •••• 08 

Marine black .... 041 

Chrome green .... 10 

French permanent green" 13 

Signwriters' black " ° 15 

GLAZIER POINTS. 
Discount, 5 per cent. 

GLUE. 

Domestic sheet 10 l 10J 

French medal 12 On 

PARIS GREEN. 

Bergirs Canadian 

6-0-1 b. caeks « 23} ;3J 

250 1b. drums 23j 23* 

100-lb. " '24 ;4 

5lJ-lb. " 14 24 

25-lb. " ... I' 241 21, 

lib. pkgs, U0 in box 25 2S 

Mb. " 50 " H 251 

lib. tins, 10) " 2! 26 

Vi-lb. pkgs 27 27 

2 p. c. 3 J days from date of shipment. 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLAUSS BRAND TAILOR'S SHEARS 

Fully Warranted 

These goods are the BEST 
and are EQUALLED only by 
such other goods as are manu- 
factured by 

Write for Trade Discounts. 

The Clauss Shear Co., Toronto, Ont. 




PREPARED PAINTS. 



60 



1 '.II 
1 00 

90 

1 5j 
1 45 
1 40 
1 3J 
1 30 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 45 
1 40 
1 !5 
1 20 
1 50 

60 

1 20 
1 20 
1 2) 
63 
66 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 50 

Bulk in less quantitv 1 80 

bladders in bbls 1 80 

Bladders in Kegs, boxes or loose 1 95 

25-lb. tinB 1 80 

1241b. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb 1 85 

Bulk in 100-lb. irons 1 80 

DRY LEAD. wn j, e red. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per i wt 6 75 6 00 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 7 50 6 25 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 6 00 

SHELLAC. 

Sheila", bleached, in bars or ground. 4ic. per 
lb., f.o.b. Eastern Canadian t oiuts. 

Shellac, bone dry. 57c. per lb., f.o.b.. Eastern 
Canadian Points; 63c, Toronto. 

Shellac, T N. orange, etc., 48c. ret. Toronto 



Pure, per galloi , in tin 

Second qualities per gallon . . 

Baru (in bbls.) 

Sherwin-Williams paintt ,} gal 

4val 

" " gal 

Canada Taint Co.'s pure 

Standard Co.'s "New Era." 

Beij. Moor. Co.'s "Ark' B'd .... 

" British Nivy deck 

Brandram-Henderun "Anchor" 

Kaoisay s paints, Pure, ner gal 

•' Thistle, " 

' Outside, bbls 55 

Martin-Senour's 100 p.c. pure,} gal. 
" J gal. 
" 1 gal. 
Jamieson's "Crown and Anchor'' 

Jamieson's floor enamel 

barn paints, bbls per gal. 

Senour's Floor Paints — gal 

Sanderson Pearcy's. pure 

Robert oil's pure paints 

W. H. & C "« Euglish raw. bbls 

" " boiled, '' 



WniTE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. 
Pure 7 

No. 1 6 

No. 2 6 

No. 3 6 

Munro's Select Flake White.. ., 
Elephant and DecoratorsTure 

Monarch 

Standard Decorator's 

EBaex Genuine 

Brandram's B. B. Genuine 

" Anchor, "pure 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 

Ramsay's Exterior 

"Crown and Anchor," pure 

Sanderson Pearcy's 

Robertson's C. P., lead 

W. H.&C'smaturedpure English 

WINDOW QLAaS. 



Per 100 1S< 

25 

9J 

56 

30 



00 



7 ro 

7 15 
6 90 

6 55 

7 ;0 
7 25 
7 40 

7 15 
6 SO 

8 25 
6 50 
6 40 
6 15 

6 50 

7 40 

7 20 

8 25 



S e United 
Inches. 

Under 26 

26 to 40 

»1 to 50 

51 to 60 

61 to 70 

71 to 80 

81 to 85 

S6 to 'JO 

91 toi'5 

S'Mo 100 

101 to 105 

'00 to 110 

Discount off list,. 2' per 



Star 
$i 25 

4 65 

5 10 
5 35 

5 75 

6 25 

7 00 



Double 

Diamond 

96 25 

6 75 

7 50 

8 50 

9 75 

11 00 

12 5.1 
15 00 
17 50 
20 50 
24 00 
27 50 

F r broken 



boxes 40 off. All prices pe' 1C0 fett. 

ZINC— DRY WHITE. 

Extra Red Seal 07 08 

French V. M 06 25 

Lehigh 05 06 

ZINC- GROUND WHITE. 

Pure 08J M\ 

No. 1 07 08 

No. 2 C5S C 06j 



VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 150 160 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elasticoak } 50 

Furniture, extra 1 10 1 25 

Ao. 1 C 90 1 00 

Hard oil finish 135 150 

Light oil finish 1 60 1 70 

Damar 1 75 2 00 

Brown japan 1 10 1 20 

Blackjapan 110 120 

" No. 1 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each.. 2 00 

Granitine *i or varnish, per g al . . . . 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 1.20 

size 2, 70c.; size 3, 40c. each. 

Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, gal., 2.50 

Canada Paint Cos sun varnish 2 00 

" Kyanize " Interior Finish 2 40 

" Flint Lac." coat h 180 

" Gold Medal," per gal., in caseB . . 2 00 

Jamieson's Copaline, per gal 2 00 

Sanderson Pearcy's amberine 2 50 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE, 
BELLS. 
Brass h*nd fells, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

I iougs, Sar^eant s doorbells. . 5 50 8(0 
Peterboro' do. r bells, discount 374 find 10 

per cent, off new list. 
American, house bells, per lb. 35 40 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 2 25 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 95 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll ] 20 

Carpet Felt per ton 55 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Surprise 40 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 50 

Tar " ■ 400 " 45 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. & I. X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 ' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 90 

Slater's felt per roll 70 

Heavy Straw Sheathing f. o. b. St. 

John and Halifax 37 50 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Wrought Iron, 70 per cent. 
Casi in.li Uuaae Pin. rt'suoun' 60 per cert. 
Wrought Steel Fast Joint and Looso Pin, 
50 per cent,. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK. 

" Lafarge " cement in wood 3 40 

"Lehigh" cement, in wood 2 54 

"Lehigh" cement, cotton sacks 2 39 

" Lehigh " cement, paper sacks 2 31 

Fire brick (Scotch) per 1,100.... 15 00 24 00 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 4 95 

Paviiv.- Flocks per 1 030. 
Blue metallic, 9"x4 "x3", ex wharf . . 35 0" 
Stable pavers, 12"x6"x2". ex wharf . . 50 00 
t table pavers, 9"x4J"x3", ex wharf . . 36 00 

DOOR SETS. 

Peterboro, 371 and 10 per cent. 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

I orrey s Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, v '.. 11 in " 95 1 65 

"nelish " 2 00 4 00 

Chicago and Reliance Coil Door Springs, 25 
per ce t. 

STORE DOOR HANDLES. 

Per Dozen 1 00 1 50 



ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 
Peterboro, 374 and 10 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
I 'on. discount 40 per cent. 
Brass, 45 per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, discount 60 per cent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. net. . 06} 

" 5-in., " 06 

" " 6-in., " 05J 

" " 8-in., " 03* 

" " 10-in. and larger . . 0-} 

Light T and strap, discount. 65 p.c. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

ua^er '2 in per 100 lb 4 75 

over 12 in " 3 75 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 80 

Spring, Woodyatt pattern, per gro., No. 5, 
817.50 No. 10, $18 ; No. 20, §10.80 ; No. 
12 820; No. 51. 810: No. 50, 827.50. 
Crate binges and back flaps, 65 and 5 p. c. 
Hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

SPRING HINGES. 

ChicagoSpring Butt sand Blanks 12$ percent. 
Triple End Spring Butts. 40 and 5 percent. 
< hicago Floor Hinges, 40 and 5 off. 
Garden City Fire Engine House Hinges, 124 
per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Oast Iron. 

Bird oage per do.'. 50 110 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought hooks and staples — 

} x 5 per gross .... 2 65 

5-16x5 " .... 3 30 

Bright sf el gate hooks and staples, 40 per 

cent, discount. 
Hat and oat wire, discount 624 per cent. 
Screw, bright wire, discount 624 per cent. 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross I 30 2 00 

White door knobs. . ..per doz 2 00 

Peterboro knobs. 371 and 10 per c. nt. 
PorceUm. mineral and jet knobs, net liat. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cenl 
Cabinet trunk and padlock 
American per gross .... 60 

LOCKS. 

Peterbjro 37% and 10 per oent 
Rns&ell * Rrwm. steel rim .^2.50 rer doz. 
Eagle cabinet locks, discount 30 per cent 
American i adlocks, all steel, 10 to 15 per 
cent.; all braas or bronze, 10 to 25 per c*. nt. 

SAND AND EMFRY PAPER. 

B. & A. sand, discount, 35 per cent 
Emery, discount 35 per oent. 
I 5«m«i IRurton si 5 to 10 per cent, advame 
on list. 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

8ectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 31 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 071 12 

WROUGHT STAPLES. 

Galvanized 2 75 

Plain 2 50 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

Bright spear point, 75 per cent, discouut. 

TOOLS AND HANDLES. 

ADZES. 

Discount 224 per cent. 

. AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 



Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 550 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 700 900 



Red Ridge, boys', handled 
hunters 



5 75 
5 25 



BITS. 

Irwin's auger, discount 474 Per cent. 
Gilrnours anger, diBcourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford auger, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 
(Jilmour s cai , 474 per cent. 
Clark s expansiv. , 40 per cent. 

Clark s gimlet, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail ind Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS 

German ner doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18 00 

CHALK. 
Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

CHISELS. 
Warnock's, discount 724 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 72'/^ per u< nt 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

§' £ 5" **.?■ 3 Per P»'' 15 

S. & D., 5 *' 



S. 4 D., 
Boynton pattern . 



224 

15 
20 



ic to 4c. per lb. 



CROWBARS. 



AXES. 

S.ngle bit, per doz 

Uouble bit, " 



5 5) 
10 00 



8 5' 
ll 00 



DRAW KNIVES. 

Oiach and Wagon, discount 75 per cent. 
Carpenters discount 75 per oent 

DRILLS. 
Millar's Falls, hand and breast, net list 
North Bros., i8ch set, 5Cc. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cen' 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 per cent. 

Arcade 75 

Kearney & Foot 75 

Disston's 75 

American 75 

J. Barton Smit h 75 

McCleUan 7 i 

Eagle 75 

Nichol son 66J 

Globe 75 

Black Diamond. 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 274 per cent 

GAUGES, 
stanlej '« discount 50 to 00 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

HANDLES. 

C. & B., fork, 40 per cent., revised list. 
C & B., hoe, 40 per cent., revised list. 

American, saw per doz 25 

American, plane ... per gross 3 15 3 75 
Canadian, hammer and hatchet 40 percent. 
Axe ami cant hook h-inales. 45 per cent. 

HAMMERS. 

Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 25 to 274 per cent. 

Magnetic tack per do/.. 1 111 1 20 

Canadian sleoge per lb. >' 07 u Oo4 

Canadian ball peau, per lb. . . 22 25 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel Underhill 5 00 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory. " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian perdoz. 5 50 6 00 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EVAPORATION REDUCED TO A MINIMUM 

is one of the reasons why PATERSON'S WIRE EDGED READY ROOFING 
will last longer than any other kind made. 

Mr. C. R. Decker, Chesterfield, Ont., used our 3 Ply Wire Edged Ready Roof- 
ing fourteen years ago, and he says it is apparently just as good as when first put on. 

We have hundreds of other customers whose experience has been similar 
to Mr. Decker's. 

THE PATERSON MFG. CO., Limited, Toronto and Montreal 



HEAT CUTTERS. 
German, 15 per cent. 
American discount, 334 per cent. 
Gem each .... 115 

NAIL POLLERS. 

German and American 85 2 50 

No. 1 85 

No 1573 75 

KAIL 8ET8. 
Square, round and octagon, per gross 3 38 
Diamond 1 00 

PICKS. 

Per dozen 600 900 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 37$ to 

40 per cent. 
Stanley planes, SI. 55 to $3 60, net list prices. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 on 5 ou 

Stanley, 2? inch, single 24c, double 39c. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, 374 to 40 per cent. 
Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler s per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

rinners, solid perset 72 

" hollow per inch .... 1 00 

RIVET 8ET8. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 374 Per cent. 



Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
tvory, discount 20 to 25 per cent . 



Atkins, band and crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, discount 124 percent 

Disston's Crosscut per foot 35 55 

H»nk, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

S. & D. solid tooth circular shingle, con- 
care and band, 50 per cent ; mill and ice, 
drag, 30 per cent.; cross-cut.35 per cent ; hand 
saws, butcher. 35 per rem . : buck, New 
Century $6.25; luck No. 1 Maple Leaf, 
t\25 : buck, Happy Medium $4.25; buck, 
Watch Spring, $t.25 ; track, common frame, 
$4.00. 

Spearfe Jackson's sa«s Hand or rip 56 in.. 
S12 75; 2i in, >'1'.25; panel, 18 in., »8 25 ; 
20 in ,$<: t<-non,10in., S9.90 ; 12 in., $10.9); 
14 in., $11.50. 

SAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

v.fsit Ket». " 7 "id 

Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 40 off. 
S. k D saw swages, 40 off. 

SCREW DRIVERS 

Sargent" perdoz. 65 I «i 

Nor' h Bros , No. 31 .per d' 7 16 81 

SHOVELS AND SP»DKS 

Bull Dog, solid neck shovel (No. 2 pol.).$18 50 
(Hollow Back) (Reinforced S Scoop.) 

Moose $17 50 $16 30 

Bear 15 00 15 30 

Fox 12 50 14 30 

Black Cat.... 10 00 13 30 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SQUARES. 
Iron, discount 20 per cent. 
Steel, discount 6=> and lu per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 524 Per cent. 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Oheaterman's each 90 2 85 

" teel each 80 8 00 

TROWELS. 



Disston's. discount 10 per cent 
8. k D.. discount 35 per cent 



FARM AND GARDEN GOODS 

i.l i.l.s. 
American cow bells, 63* per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
American, farm bells, each . . 1 35 3 00 

BULL RINGS. 
Oopper, $1.30 for 24-inch, and $1.70 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

RARS DOOR HANGERS. 

doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns wood track 4 50 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Acme, wood track 5 00 6 50 

Atlas 5 0J 6 00 

Perfect 8 00 1100 

New Milo 6 50 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1x3-16 in( 100 ft) .... 3 75 

" H x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 4 75 

Double strap hangers, doz. sets 6 40 

Standard jointed hangers, " 6 40 

Steel King hangers " 6 25 

Storm K ing and safety hangers 7 00 

" rail 4 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 

Hangers, 5 per cent 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

S. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

" sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 

HAT KNIVES. 

Net prices. 

HEAD HALTERS. 

Jute Rope, |-inch per gross 9 00 

" 4 " .... " .... 10 00 

" " I " .... " .... 12 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, li " " 5 20 

Web " 2 45 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter perdoz. 4 00 4 50 

HORSE NAILS. 
'C brand, 40, 10 and 74 percent, off list ( Oval 
M.R.M. Co. brand, 55 per cent. I head 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 

M.R.M. Co brand.base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, fiuelph. 

BOBt-E WB.IGHT3. 

Taylor Forbes, 3]c. per lb. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 25 9 25 

SCYTHE KNtTOS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SNAPS. 

Harness, Herman, discount 2j per lent. 
I nrk, Andrpw. 4 50 1100 

STALL FIXTURES. 
Warden King. 33 per cent. 

WOOD HAY RAKES. 

Ten tooth, 40 and 10 per cent. 
Twelve tooth, 4) per cent 



HEAVY GOODS NAILS, ETC. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10} 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09J 

Brook's. 80-lb. and over ...'. 11J 

Taylor- Forbes, handy 05 

VISES. 

Wright's 13* 

Brook's 12J 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

K " " No. 2... 5 50 

Sbw Vise 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (discount ) 45 per cent. 



BOLTS AND NUTS 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per rem . 
" i and smaller. . 60, 10 ind 10 
" " 7-16 and up . . . . 55 and 5 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 50 

Machine Bolts, 8 and less .... 60 and 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-1U and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and U 

Blank Bolts 55 

Bolt Ends 55 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, g and less . . 60 and 10 
" " " 7-16 and larger 50 and 5 

Coaoh Screws, conepoint 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4$c, per off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 54 to 6o. 
Stove Bolts, 75 per cent. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHER . 
Cauadian'make discount 40 per cent. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, per 100 lb., 5-16 in.. $4.40; g in., 
$3.90; 7-16 in. S3.70; 4 in, $3.50; 9-16 in.. 
S3 45; Jin., S3 35; 2in.,$i.20; I in., $3.10; 
1 in.. S3.10. 

Halttr, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.o. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain iron, discoum 35 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, dif count 40 per cent. 

PRESSED SPIKE8. 

Pressed spikes, § diameter, per 100 lbs., $3.15 

NAILS. Cut. Wire. 

2d 3 80 3 30 

3d 2 95 2 95 

4and5d '.. 2 70 2 70 

6 and 7d 2 6i) 5 60 

8and9d 2 45 • 2 45 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 4) 

16and20d 2 35 2 35 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 31 

F.o.b. Montreal. Cut nails, Toronto 20c. 
higher. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 pe cent 
Coopers' nails, discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
< 'opper Rivets, usual proportion hurrs,274 P C 
Copper Burrs only, discount 15 per ,-eut. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. pa "kages 

lc. per lb.; J-lb. packages 2c. lb 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 4c. per lb. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 87ii per cent. 
" R. H., bright, dis. 824 Pei cent 
" F. H, brass, dis. 80 percent 
" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
11 F. H-, bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
" R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 

Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 OU 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened. diB. 60 per cent. 

Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Felister head, iron, discount 30 per cent 
" " brass, discount 25 per cent. 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 5 

" " tinned 80 anil 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 75 and 10 

i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85 and 124 

" brush, blued and tinned 
bulk 70 

68 



Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 1 24 

Zinc tacks , 35 

Leather carpet tacts 40 

Copper tacks 374 

Copper nails 424 

Trunk nails, black 65 

Trunk nails, tinned and blued . . 65 

Clout nails, blued and tinned . . 65 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

niinch and duck rivets 45 

Cheese box tacks, 85 and 5 ; trunk tacks, 80 

and 10. 



CUTLERY AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 

AMMUNITION. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

American $2.00 per 1000. 
0. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000 

CARTRIDGES. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.o. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 and 5 per cent. , 
American. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, \dd 10 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol and rifle 
Dominion, 30 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent , American 
10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, Crown, 25 and 
5; Sovereign. 25, 10 and 10; Re^al, 25, 10 
and 5 ; Imperial, 25. 10 and 5. American 
20 per cent, discount. Rival and Nitro, 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Empty paper shells Dominion, 25 off and 
empty brass shells, 55 per cent. off. Am- 
erican, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Primers, Dom., 35 per cent. : American $2 05 
Wads. per ID. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

1 bin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1.0C0 

each. lOgauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 

cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge u i.l 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " l bO 

5 and 6 " I 10 

s-uperior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 9 " 1 90 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.50 

per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $8.50 net 

list. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, 

Montreal, St. John and Halifax. Terms, 

2 p.o. for cash in thirty days. 

razors. per doz. 

Elliot's * 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade & Butchers 3 60 10 00 

Wilkinson's 12 50 

Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter' 8 50 10 50 
Olauss Razors and Stroi s, 50 and 1 1 per cent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



\A/e make Electric Fixtures, Sockets, and Out-Outi 




lectrical Supplies of ell kinds 



MONTREAL. 



No Waste Circulation r^^'JE^ Trv 



PLATED 000D8 
Hollowwarc, 40 per cent, discount. 
Flatwaic, staples, 40 and 10. fancy 40 and 5 
per cent. 

SHEARS. 

''lauss, nickel, discount GO per cent. 
Clause, Japan, discount 674 percent. 
Clauss, tailors, discount 40 per oent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse. discount 30 and 10 per oent 
Game, Hawley & Norton, 50, 10 4 5 percent. 
Game, Victor, 70 per cent. 
Game, Oneida Jump (B. & L. ) 40 & 24 p. c. 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per oent. 

SKATES. 

Skates, discount 37H per cent. 

Mie Mac hockey stacks, per doz 4 CO 5 00 

New Rex hockey sticks, pe' doz 6 25 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 

APPLE PARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

BIR1> CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 and 10 p. c. 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boilers, kettles, teapots, etc. 30 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 33J per cent. 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

London, White, Princess, Turquoise, Onyx, 

Blue and White, discount 50 per cent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 50 and 10 p.C. 
Pearl, Imperial Orescent, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and white. 25 per cent. 
Japanned ware, discount 50 per cent. 
Hollow w^re, tinned cast, 35 per cent. off. 

KITCHEN NOVELTIES. 

Can openers, per doz U 40 75 

Mincing knives per doz 50 80 

Duplex mouse traps, per doz 65 

Potato mashers, wire, per doz. . . 60 70 

wood " . . 50 60 

Vegetable slicers, per doz 2 25 

Uuiversal meatchopper No. 0, $1; No.l, 1.15. 

Enterprise chopper, each 130 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

£ing,wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

AUglass " 50 90 

PICTURE NAIXS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

Tin and gilt, picture wire, 75 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 91 

OoramoD, plain 4 50 

plated S 50 

Asbestos, per set 125 



TINWARE. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2 in. plain or corrugated., per 100 feet. 

rl 30; 3 in, 84.40; 4 in, $5.8 J; Sin, $7.45; 
, in., $9.9'. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUOH8. 

10-inob per 100ft. 3 30 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
Milk can trimmings, discount 25 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

I o. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast .... per doz. 6 50 
Tubular and Hinge Plain, " 4 75 
letter quality at higher prices. 
Unarming, 50c. per doz. extra. 



7 00 
7 50 



OILERS. 

Kemp's Tornado and MeClary e Model 
galvanized oil can, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent 

Zinc and tin, discount 50 per cent 

Coppered oilers, 20 per cent. off. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent, off. 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

PAILS (GALVANIZED). 

Duflerin pattern pails, 40. 10 and 5 per cent. 
Flaring pattern, discount 40, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs 40. 10 and 5 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flarii.g sap buckets, discount 40 per cet t. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cen* 
Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 35 p c. 
Creamery cans, discount 40 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, 75 and 124 per cent, off revised list. 
RetiLued, 72i 10 and 5 per cent, revised list. 
SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks 8 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 
7 inch " " 



STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch " 1 48 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per oent. 



WIRE. 

BRIGHT WIRE OOOIis 

Discount 62) per oent. 

CLOTHES LINE WIRE. 

7 wire solid line, No. 17. $4.90: No. 
18, $3.00; No. 19, §2.70; B wire solid liDe, 
No. 17, $4.45 ; No. 18, $2.80. No. 19. $2.50. 
All prices per 1000 ft. measure. F.o.b. Hamil- 
ton Toronto, Montreal. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9, 82 55. No. 11. $3.20 : 
No. 1?. $2.80. 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE. 

Discount 45 per cent. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 30 per cent List of extras : 
In 100-lb. lots : No. 17, $5 — No. 18, 
$5.50 — No. 19, $6 — No. 20, $6.65 - No. 21, 
$71 -No. 22, $7.30 - No 23, $7,65 -No. 
24, $8 - No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50-No. 27, 
$10-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13- 
No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net — tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
75c. — oiling, 10c. — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c. — in 5 
and 1Mb. bundles, 25c.— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in J-lb. banks, 38c.— in J-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c.— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 



GALVANIZED WIRE. 
Per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, $3.70 - 
Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 — No. 9, $2.50 - 
No. 10. $3.20 -No. 11, $3.25 -No. 12, $2.65 
—No. 13, $2.76— No. 14. $3.75— No 15, $4.30 
— No. 16. $4.30 from stock. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2.35 f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlots 
12Jc. less. 

LIGHT STRAIGHTENED WIRE. 

Over 20 in. 

Gauge No. per 100 lbs. 10 to 20 in. 5tol0in. 

to 5 $0.50 $0.75 $1.25 

6 to 9 0.75 1.25 2 00 

10 to 11 1.00 1.75 2.50 

12 to 14 1.50 2.25 3.50 

15 to 16 2.00 3.00 4.50 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-1 gaug", $2.2i: No. 10 gauge, 6c- 
extra; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra; No. 12 
gauge, 20c. extra; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra; 
No 4 gauge. 40c. extra ; No. 15 gauge. 55c. 
extra ; No. 16 gaii^e. 7 e. extra. Add 6Cc. 
for coppering and §2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c , 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c. , 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and lll-lb. bundles 25c, in lib 
hanks, 50c, in J-lb. hanks 75c, in i-lb. 
hanks $1. 

POULTRV NETTING. 

2 in mesh 19 w. g., discount 50 and 10 per 
cent. All others 50 per cent. 

WIRE fIT.OTCT 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls, $1.62%, per 
100 sq. ft.; in 50-ft rolls §1. 67%, per 100 sq ft. 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WIRK FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 95 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 30 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.70 for 
small lots and $2.60 for carlot . 



WOODENW0RE. 

CHURNS. 

No.0, $9; No. 1, $9; No. 2, $10; No. 3, 
$11 ; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. MaryB, 30 and 30 
per cent; fob. Ottawa, Kingston and 
Montreal, 40 and 15 per cent, discount, 
Taylor-Forbes, 30 and 30 per cent. 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reeia, dis. 40 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders,dis.40 per cent. 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

" Best " mops 1 25 

"900 "mops 125 

Folding ironing toards 12 03 16 50 

REFRIGERATORS 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 7 25 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grained 
only, 4-in., style per doz. 7 55 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, light st air 
pel doz 9 55 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 60 00 

Square " ' 63 00 

Eclipse, per doz 54 00 

Dowswell " 39 00 

New Century, per doz 75 00 

Daisy 54 00 

WRINGERS 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., per doz. ... 34 00 

Royal American. 11 in. .. ?4 CO 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 3*75 

Tt rnis, 2 per cent., 30 day-. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELTINO. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 p.c. 

Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per ctnt 

Lace leather, per side, 75c; cut laces, 80c 

BOOT CALKs. 

Small and medium, ball per M 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American perdoz. 100 150 

Milliard's " 6 50 

OA8TOR8. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

PINE TAP.. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

" " .... 9 60 

PULLEY8. 

Hothouse perdoz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 22 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 140 2 00 

Canadian pitcher spout .... 180 3 16 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal 10} 

Pure Manilla 15$ 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

Jincb 25 28 

Russia Deep See 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

double 104 

Sisal bed cord. 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

•' 72 feet " 95 

Twine. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 25 

,r " 4-ply 29 

Mattress twine per lb 33 45 

Staging " " 27 35 



Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Giirney Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 40 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent, 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
" " Champion, , discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

STONES— oil. VND SCYTHE. 

Washita per lb. 25 9 37 

Hindostan " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek " 10 

Deerlick " .... 25 

Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " .... 42 

Arkansas " 150 

Wnter-of-Ayr ' 10 

Scythe per grow 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton. .. . 20 00 22 00 

" under401b., " 24 00 

" 200 lb. and over 28 00 



69 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



KEARNEY & FOOT 



The 

Best 

Rasp 

Made 




The 
Rasp 
that 
sells 



MADE BY 



Nicholson File Co., 



Dominion 
Wks. 



Port Hope, Ont 



Wrought Iron Pipe and Cast Iro n Fittings 

Our Stock in these lines is complete. 
Can fill all orders promptly. Be sup- 
plied before the Pall rush commences. 



WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



A 

Alabastine Co 54 

Armstrong Bros Tool Co 14 

Armstrong Mfg. Co 12 

Atkins, E. 0., S Co 57 

AtlasMfg.Co 47 

B 

Banwell Hoxk Wire Fence Co 18 

Bam' tt. O. & H. Co outside back cover 

Belleville Holing Mill- 15 

Birkctt. Tbos. & Son Co 1 

Blanchite Process Taint Co 55 

Bowmanville Foundry Co 12 

Bowser. S. F , 4 Co 11 

Brandram Henderson 51) 

Brantford Roofing Co 9 

Burr Mfg. Co 12 

c 

Catneron 4 Caropb. 11 20 

Canada Foundry Co 12 

Canada Horse Nail Co 20 

Canada lion Furnace 1 1 4t 

Canada Metal Co 14,(3 

Canada Paint. Co 52 

Canada Paner Co 12 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works 49 

Canadian Fairbanks Co 62,64 

Canadian Hen'ng 4 Ventilating Co. . 17 

( anu'lian Oil Co 5i 

Canadian Rubber O outside back cover 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Oo 43 

Caverhill. Learmont It Co 7 

Chicago Sprine Butt Co 1 

Clauss 8hear Co 67 

duff Bros 63 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 44 

Consumers' Cordage Co 10 

Copp.W. J 39 

CovertMfe.Oo 14 

Crain, Rolla L . Co 1 

Cumming Mfg. Co 18 

D 

Davenport, Percy P 12 

Davidson, Thos.. Mfg. Oo 4 

Dieckmann, Ferdinand 45 

Dominion Cartridge Co 17 

Dorken Bros ouuide front cover 

DowswellMlg. Co 9 

Dundas Axe Works 21 

E 

Eadie. H. G 57 

Emlyn Saw Bench 14 



English Embrocation Co 72 

Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Akron, Ohio 

inside back cover 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., of Pa 14 

Krie Specialty Oo inside back cover 

F 

Finan ial Post 19 

Forman. John f4 

Forwell Foundry Co 62 

Fox.C. H 53 

Frothingham & Workman 6 

Q 

Gait Art Metal Oo 47 

O'bb. Alexander 53 

Gibsone, J. B 15 

Gilbertson, W., 4 Co 43 

Glauber Brass Co 62 

Ureeomg. B., Wire Oo 72 

(Jin-'lph Spring and Axle Co 47 

Uutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co.... 

outside back cover 

H 

Hamilton Rifle Co 16 

Hanover Portland Cement Co 12 

Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Co ... . 21 

Harrie.J. W., Co '. . . . 11 

Heinisch, R.. Sons Oo 14 

Hobbs Mfg. Oo 20 

Howland, H. S., SonsiOo 5 

Hutton, Jas., & Co 62 

Hyde.F. 4 Oo 13 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 48 

International Portland Cement Co . . 12 

J 

Jamieson, R. C, &Oo 49 

Jardine, A. B., 4 Oo 43 

Johnson's. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 53 

Joy Mfg. Co 17 

K 

Kemn Mfg. Oo 22 

Kerr Engine Co 64 

L 

Leslie, A. C, A Co. outside front cover, 43 

Lewis Bros., Limited 3 



Lewis, Rice, 4 Son inside front coier 

Lockerby 4 McComb 57 

London Foundry Co 64 

London RolbDg Mills 12 

Louden Machinery Co 49 

Lucas. John 51 

Ludger Gravel Co 16 

Lufkin Rule Oo inside back cover 

Mo 

McArthur. Corneille 4 Co 57 

McArthur. Alex., 4 Oo 66 

MoCaskill,Dougall4Co 49 

McClary Mfg. Co 17 

MoDougall, R., Co 65 

M 

Martin-Senour Co 51 

Maxwell. David 72 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 13 

Metallic Roofing Co 41 

Mitchell, H. W 6u 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co 47 

Moore, Benjamin, & Co 53 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co f-8 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co ... . 14 

Mueller, H., Mfg. Co 65 

Munderloh 4 Co 69 

N 

Newman, W., 4 Sons 15 

Nicholson File Co 70 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Goal Oo 43 

o 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons 43 

Ontario Lantern 4 Lamp Co 72 

Ontario Steel Ware Co 15 

Ontario Tack Co 43 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Oo . . 15 

Orford Copper Co 43 

Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Ftting Oo 62 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 11 

P 

Paterson Mfg. Co ,.,, 68 

Pearson, Geo D., 4 Co 43 

Pelton, Godfreys 49 

Penberthy Injector Oo 65 



Peterborough Lock Co 9 

Peterborough Shovel 4 Tool Co 22 

Phillips. Ohas. D 47 

Phillips, Geo., 4 Co 13 

Pink, Thos 2 



Ramsay, A., 4 Son Co 51 

Reid, David 39 

Robertson, James Co inside back cover 

Roper, J. H 18 

Round, John, 4 Son 10 

s 

Samuel, M. 4 L., Benjamin, 4 Co 2 

Scott. Bathgate 4 Co 53 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 14 

Shantz. I. E., 4 Co 62 

Sharratt 4 Newth 62 

Shirrefl Mfg. Co 13 

Sherwin-Williams Co 42 

Shurley 4 Deitrirh 8 

Silica Barytic Stone Oo 14 

Spear & Jackson 4 

Stairs, Son 4 Morrow 70 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co > 8 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 49 

Starr Mfg. Co 46 

Stauntons Limited 11 

Steel Trough and Machine Co 17 

Stephens, G. F..4C0 36 

Still, J. N, &Co 11 



Taylor-Forbes Oo outside front cover 

Thompson, B. 4 S.H..Oo. outside back cover 
Toronto and Belleville Roll ng Mills. . . i3 
Turner Brass Works 64 



United Factories 55 

Universal Systems 16 



Vickery, O. 



w 

Western Assurance Co 

Western Wire Nail Oo , 

WilkinBon, Neywood 4 Clark.. 
Winnipeg Paint and Glass Oo 
Wright, E. T., 4 Co 



22 

9 
56 



70 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Auditors. 

Davenport, Percy I*., Winnipeg. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Robertson, Jas. Co,, Montreal. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Carriage Mounting Co., Toronto. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 
Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson b. Iver, Arms and Cycle Worka 
FiU-hburg, Mass 

Binder Twine. 

Consumers Cordage Co., Montreal. 

Box Strap. 

J. N. W:li in Montreal. 

Brass Goods. 

Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Mueller Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Wiudsor, Out. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Bronze Powders. 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works, Mon- 
treal. 

Brushes. 

Ramsay, A., 4 Son Co., Montreal. 

Can Openers. 

Cumming Mfg. Co. Renfrew. 

Cans. 

Acme Can Works, Montreal. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Frothingham 4 Workman Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby 4 McComb, Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Newman 4 Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule 4 Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Carriage Accessories. 

Carriage Mountings Co., Toronto. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co. .Nashua, N.H 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Brie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Clutch Nails. 

J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Cut Glass. 

Phillips, Geo., & Co., Montreal. 

Cutlery— Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ottawa. 
Clauss Shear Co. , Toronto 
Dorken Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Phillips, Geo.. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, 4 Son, Montreal. 

Door Hangers. 

Door Hanger Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 
Forman, John, Montreal. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh 4 Co., Montreal. 

Electro Cabinets. 

Cameron 4 Campbell Toronto. 

Engines, Supplies, etc. 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 



Files and Rasps. 

Bamett Co.. G. 4 H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File Co., Port Hope 

Financial Institutions 

Bradstrect Co. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Rifle Co , Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington 4 Richardson Anns Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitohburg, Mass. 

Food Choppers. 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Galvanizing. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine 4 Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Gibsone, J. B., Montreal. 
Pelton, Godfrey S. 
Sharratt 4 Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., 4 Son, Loudon, Eng. 

Hack Saws. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Harvest Tools. 

Mat le Leaf Harvest Tool Co , Tillson- 
burg, Ont. 

Hoop Iron. 

Montreal Rolling Mil's Co , Montreal. 
J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Horse Blankets. 
Heney, E. N., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers and Radi- 
ators. 

Cluff, R. J., 4 Co., Toronto. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automa tic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ottawa. 
Maxwell, D., & Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Taylor, Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Lawn Swings, Settees, Chairs. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Renfrew. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Business Systems, Toronto. 
Copeland-Chatterson Co , Toronto. 
Crain, Rolla L., Co.. Ottawa. 
Universal Systems, Toronto. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., 4 Co., Pembroke Ont. 

Mantels, Grates and Tiles. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Fox.O. H., Vancouver. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Mitchell, David O, 4 Co., Glasgow.Scot. 

Mitchell, H. W., Winnipeg. 

Pearce, Frank, 4 Co. Livtrpiol, Eog. 

Sct;tt, Bathgate 4 Co., Winnipeg. 

Thome, R. E., Montreal and Toronto. 



Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Mel il I lo., Toronto. 

Kadie, II. (i , Montreal. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Leslie, A. C, 4 Co., Montreal. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Nova Si i>l in Steel ami (mil Co., New 

Glasgow, N S. 
Robertson, Ju., Co., Hoi 
Roper, J II , Monl 
. Samuel, Benjamin 4 Co., Toronto. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax. N.S. 
Thompson. B. 4 S. U. 4 Co. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, 
Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons, London, Kug. 

Mops. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Refrew. 

Mouse Traps. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Renfrew. 

Oil Tanks. 

Bowser, S. P., 4 Co., Toronto. 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass. 

Bell, Thos., Sons 4 Co , Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co.. Toronto. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Fenner, Fred., & Co., London, Eng. 
Henderson 4 Potts Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. O, 4 Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Corneille 4 Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill. Dougall 4 Co.. Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Mon'real. 
Moore, Benjamin, 4 Co. Toronto. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay 4 Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Worke 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens 4 Co., Winnipeg. 
Martin-Seuour Co., Chicago. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Borden Co„ Warren, Ohio. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Cluff, R. J., 4 Co., Toronto. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jardine, A. B., 4 Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., Boston, Mass. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 
Merrell Mfg. Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Mi ntreal Rolling Mids, Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Mueller, H., Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Fitting Co.,Oshawa 
Robertson Jas., Co. Montreal. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
Standard Sanitary Co., Pittsburg. 
Stephens, G F„ 4 Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Turner Brass Works, Chicago. 
Vickery, Orlando, Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Grey 4 Bruce Portland Cement Co., 
Owen Sound. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 

Hyde, F, 4 Co., Montreal. 

Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal. 

Potato Mashers. 

Cumming Mfg Co., Renfrew. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Razors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford. 
McArthur, Alex., & Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto 4 Montreal. 

Saws. 

Atkins, E. O, 4 Co., Indianapolis, Ind 
Lewis Bros. , Montreal. 
Shurly 4 Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 
Spear 4 Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 

Saws — Hack. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 



Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 

Sere iv Cabinets, 

Cameron 4 Campbell, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Oo , Montreal. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 
Ingersoll. Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamiltor 
Hyde, F., 4 Co.. Montreal. 

Shelf Boxes. 

Cameron 4 Campbell, Toronto, 

Shears, Scissors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 

Shelf Bracket?. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Shellac 

Bell, Thos., Sons 4 Co., .Montreal. 

Shovels and Spades. 

Canadian Shovel Co. Hamilton. 
Peterboro Shovel 4 Tool Co , Peterboro. 

S/7verware. 

Phillips, Geo., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, ft Son, Sheffield, Eng. 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel 4 Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stoves, Tinware, Furnaces 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co 

Owen Sound. 
Canada Stove Works, Harriston, Ont 
Clare Bros. 4 Co., Preston. 
Davidson. Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Guelph Stove Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Fouudry Co., Toronto. 
Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Joy Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnf*. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co., Hamilton. 

Tacks. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 

Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Pearson, Geo. D., Montreal. ' 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wheelba rro ws 

London Foundry Co., London, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill, Learmont 4 Co., Montreal 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 
Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms. 

Hobbs Mfg. Oo., London, Ont. 

Wire Springs. 

Guelph Spring Axle Co., Guelph, On j 
Wallace- Barnes Co., Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

Canada Fence Co., London. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal 
Greening, B.. Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire 4 Nail Co., London, Ont 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Out. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Ale.'.. 4 Co , Montreal. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 



71 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




FAVORITE 



CHURN 



More sold in the Dominion 
than all others oombined 



In B Bize*, churning from 3-g to 30 gallons. 
IMPROVED STEEL FRAME PATENT FOOT and LEVER DRIVE. 

PATENT STEEL ROLLER BEARINGS 
l'.iw to operate. Holts throughout in p*aoe of wood 
■crews. Superior in workmanship and finish. No Other 
Just as good. Accept no substitute. If not offered by 
your jobber write direct to 



MAXWELL 
LAWN 
MOWER 




Made In 4 different heights of wheel and widths. 

ranging from 8 to 25-in. in plain or ballbearings as 
required. Improved for coming season. Not equalled 
anywhere for clean cutting, durability and finish. 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARY'S, ONT. 




LION 



53 



BRAND 



Trade Mark 



PUTZ TRIPLE EXTRACT 

METAL POLISH 

LIQUID and PASTE 

For polishing all kinds of metals " Lion " 
Brand Putz Triple Extract Metal Polish 
has no equal. Gives a lasting lustre. Put 
up in liquid and past; form. Has a ready 
sale. If not in stock send a postal for ex- 
ceptional terms. Something that will give 
you handsome profits. 

English Embrocation Co,, 

Montreal, Quebec 




Buy Canadian made goods and get the best. 

Banner Burners, 

Canada Burners, 

King Glass Cone 
Burners. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



ONTARIO LANTERN & LAMP CO., Ltd. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




All Kinds and Sizes and for All Purposes. 

Standard and Lang's 
Patent Lay. 



Prices Right 



Prompt Shipments 



Rope Fittings 
Rope Grease 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

Hamilton, Ont. Montreal, Que. 



72 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THURBER 

Babbitt Metal 




IS CONCEDED BY EXPERTS TO BE THE 

BEST BABBITT 

For Heavy Slow Machinery 

Heavy Line Shafting, etc. 

12c. lb. TRY IT. 

The James Robertson Co., wen 

144 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 



PFLUEGERS 
Fishing' TacKle 



_ 




Hoohs, Flies, 
Trolls, Spin- 
ners, Phan- 
toms, Reels, 
Furnish ed 
Lines. 

Everything 
in Fishing 
Tachle. 



NOTICE— Free to Any Dealer in Sporting Goods, 
Sent Express Prepaid, 170-Page Illustrated Cata- 
logue No. Fas, and Metal Fish Sign in 8-Color 
Lithograph. 

The Enterprise Mfg. Co. 

AKRON, Ohio, U.S.A. 




/(//TfC/M MEASURING TAPES 

/ * Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, lis Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Eti, 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

London Ottlom and Warehouie- 24 ind 26 Holborn- New Y.rk City Branch- £M Broadi 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




Inc. 1896 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

Copy of cata- 
logue tent free 
to any Inter- 
acted file user 
upon applica- 
tion. 




■ ■ 



THE BURMAN No. 13 PATENT 

POWER 
CLIPPER 

A light and compactly built 
machine specially designed for 
portability. 

When taken to pieces it packs 
into a case 17 in. by 11 in. by 7 
in., the total weight being only 
34 lbs. 

All cogs are machine-cut from 
solid metal. 

The No. 13 is a triumph of 
efficiency at the lowest possible 
cost. 

Prices anal Catalogues with full particulars upon 
application to 

B.&S.H.TH0MPS0N& Co. 

LIMITED 

53 ST. SULPICE STREET, MONTREAL 




Redstone 



ff 



High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 

A packing that will hold. For use in highest 
pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured Sole!, by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

Branches i Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



II 



CANADIAN' 



SPIRAL PACKING 

(Highest Quality) 

"Made in Canada" 

We've manufactured 90 per cent, 
of all Spiral Packing sold in Can- 
ada during the past twenty years. 

Our Packing is Different— and Better 
THE 

CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 



OF MONTREAL LIMITED 



155 Granville Street, - Halifax. N.S. 
, Imperial Bank Bldg.. I Montreal. 
St James Street J Que. 
Front & Yonge Sts., - Toronto, Ont. 
89 Princess St.. - Winnipeg, Man- 
403 Cordova St., - Vancouver, B.C. 



Mark of Quality 



Dewdney St., 
First St. W., - 
Wharf St., - 



Regina, Sask. 
Calgary, Alta. 
Victoria. B.C. 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE-METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 
Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 19, 1007 



NO. 3. 




\ CUTLERY 



f 



For Sale by leading Wholesale Hardware Houses 



Forty Years of Steady Success 

for 

"Queen's Head" 

not yet equalled in Quality. 

JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A, C. LESLIE & CO. Ltd., MONTREAL 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers, Canadian Iranch. 



A Few Facts for the Consideration of 

the Man who Wants More Business 

The "Sovereign" Hot Water Boiler should be re- 
commended all the time — because you can make no claim 
for the "Sovereign" which it will not make good. 

The " Sovereign " is the most economic boiler on the 
market. Hundreds of enthusiastic users say so right over 
their signatures. 

The many devices — peculiar to the "Sovereign" and 
making for boiler perfection — which appealed so strongly to 
you practical men, are now universally recognized. 

Note : Let us show you just how much the " Sovereign " Hot 
Water Boilers should mean to you from a pecuniary stand-point. 




TAYLOR - FORBES COMPANY, Limited 

Head Office and Works : GUELPH, ONT. 



TORONTO— 1088 King St. West. 



MONTREAL 122 Craig St. West. 



See Classified List of Advertisements on Page 67. 



HARDWARE AND MfiTAL 



WINTER 



SPORTING GOODS 




Tube Speed Skates 





OOrtrtt fl PATENTED 




Tube Hockey Skates 



Snow Shoes 



TOBOGGANS 

HAND 
SLEIGHS 

SNOW 
SHOES 

MOCCASINS 




Hockey Skates 




HOCKEY SUPPLIES 

PUCKS 
STICKS 
SHIN 

PADS 
GAUNTLETS 
ANKLE 
SUPPORTS 
ETC. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



Clamp Skates 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LlfllTED 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



C|l I® Mo 

SPRlNG^rBUTTS 

A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

CHICAQO SPRING BUTT 





o 




,, 



A 







TRIPLE-END SPRINQ BUTT 



w 






CHICAGO BALL-HEARING 
FLOOR HINGE 



«£bte3<5c? Spring ^Buii (Tompatttj 

CHICAGO NEW YORK 

CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 



OUR LINES 

FOR XMAS 

ARE SELLERS 

BOKER'S SKATES 

Single and Double lenders. 

Dominion Perfect, Rover, King Fisher, Crescent 

HOCKEY STICKS 
GILLETTE SAFETY RAZORS 

No stropping; no honing. 

GILLETTE EXTRA BLADES 

BOKER'S KING CUTTER RAZORS 

RODGER'S PEN AND POCKET KNIVES 

CARVERS IN CASES 

SCISSORS IN CASES 

QUALITY HIGH PRICES LOW 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

Wholesale Hardware 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIHITID 



Other Tools are very " ' 
Good Tools, but 

SCREW DRIVERS 



YANKEE TOOLS" 



AR 




The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 
of the KIND. 

DRILLS 



do. 10 * II — RATCHET, right and left hand and rigid. 





No. 15 RATCHET, with finger turn on blade. 

i 




No. 40— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with Ratchet Movement. 

5 



No. 30 SPIRAL RATCHET right and left hand and rigid. 

No. 31— " '.' (heavy pattern) 

No. 20— " " right hand only. MS 



Chuck and 8 Drill Points 

for ipiral ratchet 

■crew driver. 



Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 

•crew driver. 




No. CO-POCKET 
SCREW DRIVER. 




No «* AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 





No 50 RECIPROCATING DRILL, for wood or metals. 

SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO 



HILADi 



A, r=e> 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




P|!\|r*C MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pink's Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rock Maple. 

These are light unci durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 

MANUFACTURED BY 

SLW THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Qnt, Canada. 



Established 1855 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

PIG IRON 

ENGLISH and SCOTCH 



Prompt and forward delivery. 



Interesting prices. 



Warehouse: 54-56-58 Front St. West and 1 Piper St. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



UNION ADJUSTABLE PLANES 



IRON, SMOOTH BOTTOM 



Ail Sizes 
Jack 
Fore 
Jointer 




No. 4U 




Wood, with Iron Top, No. 26 U. All sizes 




Wood, with Iron Top, No. 502. Smooth. 
Length, 8 in ; Cutter, 1 3-4- in. 




Union Adjustable Block Plane, No. 91-2 U. 
Length, 6 in.; Cutter, 1 3-4 in. 



"ON THE SQUARE" 

is about the most appropriate way 
to express ourselves in regard to 

UNION PLANES 



They certainly are " on the square." 
Not the cheapest goods on the 
market, nor yet the highest priced, 
but as regards the quality they 
take no second place. 

Write us for prices and inform- 
ation if you want to get your 
money's worth in the "plane line" 
of your business. 



LEWIS BROS., no 



OTTAWA 
TORONTO 

3 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 
CALGARY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»♦♦♦♦ 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAGE 



PACKING 



LATHYARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jutk 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Rope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: HONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 

BRANCHES: 



F. H. ANOREW8 & SON, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO.. Limited, St. John, N.B. MacQOWAN & CO., Vancouver' 

TEES «t PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. QEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 



Supplies for Sugar Makers— 




Cuts 
Show- 
Full 
Size 
Of 
Spouts 



MAPLE SYRU P 
"EUREKA" "LOWER CANADA" 



CANS 



Steel Sap Spouts 




Patented 1896 




All packed in cardboard boxes, 100 each 




"IMPERIAL" 



Steel 

Sap 

Spouts 



(Specially adapted for Covered Sap Buckets) 



SQUARE — With 



ROUND and 
Screw Tops. 

Plain or Lithographed. 
Capacity : 

1 Qt. Wine Measure. 

1 Qt. Imperial Measure. 

' • Gall. Wine Measure. 

% Gall. Impl. Measure. 

1 Gall. Wine Measure. 

1 Gall. Impl. Measure. 
Special design made up, if sufficien 
quantities are wanted. 




Sap | 

Buckets 

Long Pattern 

Noa. 7 S 12 16 

Quarts 4 6 8 12 

Western Pattern 



6 and 10 Quarts 




Long pattern 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. Ltd., 



MONTREAL and 

WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H 



S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO, 

HARDWARE MERCHANTS ~* 



LIMITED 



Only 
Wholesale 



138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



Wholesale 
Only 




•Victor- Flour Sifter 




'Ideal" Food Chopper 




"Universal" Bread Maker 

No. Capacity 
4 4 Loaves. Heavy Tinned Sheel Steel 
8 10 " ' 



Slaw and Kraut Cutters 

Adjustable 




"Universal " Food Choppers 



"Sterling" Vegetab e Cutters 




•'Universal" Cake Maker 

Capacity 1 Gallon 





Griswold Food Chopper 




'■Universal " Meat Choppers 



For other Makes of Cutters see our Hardware Catalogue 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



We Ship promptly 



Opposite Union Station. 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Factory : Dufferin 8treet, Toronto, Ont. 

5 



Our Pric«s are Rlfrht 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you intend to sell files, why not sell the best ? 




The best goods will capture the best trade and 




keep it. JOWITT FILES are made in an 




'k' 



English factory where the whole process is con- 




trolled, from making the steel to the finished file, 






mmmmmmmm&miii 



m 





They wear longer and cut faster than other|jfiles. 



■«■ 



MMM«MMHM«M 



. 




We have sold them for nearly 40 years. Sell 



JOWITT FILES. Packed in pasteboard boxes. 

Hardware 
Montreal 



JUVYll 1 ril^O. rai 

F>W. 





FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited, MONTREAL, CANADA. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALS 



BAR IRON and STEEL 
BLACK SHEET IRON, TINNED SHEETS 

GALVANIZED IRON 

CANADA PLATES, TERNE PLATES 

SHEET TIN, INGOT TIN 

PIG LEAD 

SHEET ZINC, ZINC SPELTER 

IRON PIPE, VALVES and f ITTINGS 

PULLEY BLOCKS and ROPE 

CHAIN 
ANVILS and VISES 
LUMBERING TOOLS 



MONTREAL and \A/ 1 IN INI I F=> EI O 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

H/GH-CLASS SAWS 







J 



No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted, Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




V MES 4 

" DIETRICH 

'(>MNED PATE NTs 

; 30 1176 MAft^ 

b RAZOR STEEL - 

$100 FORONEOUT. A 

^ J 500 OAYSWpRK V% 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret process. 







No. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If yon want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



Manufactured 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



CALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Brantford— Roofings 



This Represent* Our 



.rfrfffliimw 




"ASPI1ALT" 

No. I, 2, 3 

"RUBBER" 
No. I, 2, 3 

Each Roll Is complete with Nails 
and Cement to lay. Beat selling 
goods In the market. 

BRANTFORD ROOFING CO. 

1.1 M II I D 

BJAVrrOM), OMTA.MO 




SIMPLE 




the 



LEADER 



A Name familiar to Butter Makers in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



ITS STRONG I'OIMS 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Lever and Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatcbable for cleaning. 

Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



STYLE F. 



W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK SHo?, """" W00PE " P,CWET " w "" 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. LimiUd, 



-LONDON, ONT 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS* f 

"yARETHE BEST 

Klgiiwt Quality Grooming %nd I f 

WE MAKE THEM. MSl 

KIND FOR CtTAUOOV* TO afc^ 

'— — — - | • * 

Weibuaoh k Hilger, Limited special New York 
rBpresontatirea, 9-15 Murray Street. 




The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 





Peterborough, Ont. 



Manufacturers of all kinds 



Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Leading Jobbers 
In the Dominion. 



Oyllnd.r Night Latch, No. 103. 



HARDWARE AND METAU 



Serviceable 
Combination ^ TABLE 
Cabinet 



FOR 

HARDWARE 

TRADE 



A COMBINATION THAT 
i:\ HRYBODY MUST HAVE 



CONTE NTS 

6 Table Knives 
6 Dessert Knives 
6 Table Forks 
3 Table Spoons 
6 Dessert Forks 
6 Dessert Spoons 
6 Tea Spoons 
2 Salt Spoons 
1 Mustard Spoon 

42 Pieces 



Price Complete 

Lli 
SILVER PLATED 322.30 

LIST 

$14.00 



LIST 



BEST 

NICKEL SILVER 



JOHN ROUND & SON, l™ 



MANUFACTURING 



Cutlers and Silversmiths 

Factories MONTREAL Established 

SHEFFIELD, Eng. 1847 




Size Of Case 16' . -in. x 14',-in. x 2' 4 -ln 



,M 



i*S 






:°^, 




w 



w 



Manufacturers of 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 

MONTREAL TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Iron and Steel Mire, 

Brass Wire, 

Gopper Wire, 

Wire Nails, 

Wood Screws, 

Staples, 

Jack Chain, 

Bright Wire Goods, 

Spring Gotters, 

Steel Wire Barrel Hoops 

When Ordering PLEASE Specify DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO.'S Goods 



START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT 

No doubt many ot our customers throughout 
the Dominion have completed their stock-taking. 

Stocks in many lines must be low. 

We would suggest that our customers antici- 
pate their requirements and send us their speci- 
fications at an early date, so as to ensure prompt 
deliveries. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Shrewd Dealer 

wastes no floor space. He merelj carries 
the goods his customers demand. Our 
liue of 

PIKE POLES 

is considered a good deal better than the 
best marketed by our competitors. 

Lumbermen have proven their superi- 
ority and always demand them. 

We also make a full line of CANT 
HOOK, PEAVY and AXE HANDLES. 
NOW'S a good time to order. 



J. H. Still Manufacturing Company, 

ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



Limited 



: It Saves Lives : 



A Building Necessity 

These are the names that have 
been made synonymous with the 

AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

We are the manulacturers of it and 
control the patents. 

We have placed it on some of the 
finest buildings in the Dominion. 

It is a scientific fact that no modern 
buildings can afford to neglect sani- 
tation. 

We are contractors and sanitary ex- 
perts. Our ventilator is guaranteed 
and is placed in position to suit the 
building as to quality and size. 
One Testimony : 

Mow rREAL, June 12th, 1808. 

Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 
Messrs. J. W. HARRIS Co., LrMITKD, 

7 St. Elizabeth St.. Montreal, Que. 
Gentlemen,— Answering yours ol June 1st, I am 
not personally familiar with the merits .'I the 
"AkOI.IAN" Ventilators hut our Assistant Engi- 

neer, .Mr. P, Crossley, reports that the Ventilators 

of this type manufactured by you and used by this 
Company at the Place Vigor Hotel, Chateau I'ron- 
tenac, Windsor Street Station and elsewhere, have 
proved satistactory. Yours trulv, 

The J. W. HARRIS CO., Limited 

Successors to LESSARD & HARRIS 

General Contractors and Manufacturers 

MONTREAL 




A*-l Brand Cutlery is Always Worth the 
Money You Pay for it 

Every Knife and Scissor is guaranteed to be of the best 
quality of steel, right temper, superior finish and finest 
workmanship. That is why this brand is a favorite in the 
Canadian Market, and your stock is not complete without the 
goods of 

THE R. BERG CUTLERY CO. 




F. W. LAMPLOUGH & CO., MONTREAL 



Buy the Best- 




HERCULES 



Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Stir Brand Cotton Twine 

P.r S.I. by all Whole..!. Dsalsrs. 



genuine Pratts Astral Lamp Oil 

Sold in all countries and recognized as the highest grade oil manufactured. 

WHOLESALE ONLY 
THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY Limited, 



B. A. GRAUTOFF & CO. 

8 Fenchurch Buildings, London, E.C. 
Import and Export. 

Old established house with highest connections in 

Great Britain and on the Continent of Europe. 
Cable Address, " Grautoff London," Licbers Code. 



TORONTO, ONT. 



Persons adrlressinrr ndVrrtisors will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Four Reasons why JNVICTUS FIBRE is the BEST FIBRE PAPER on the Market 




Invictus Fibre is made from '-elected pulp wood cut on our own limits. 

\1 pulpi ^Wi'd I* again rigidly culled on arrival at our mills 

3. The pu'T frorri"whicir Invictus Fibre is made is manufactured in our own pulp mill and transferred 

at once K> th* paper mill, avoiding all drawbacks of transportation. 

4. Invietus Fibre will increase in strength and not grow hard and brittle as does fibre made from sul- 
phite pulp. This is a qualit] of the peculiar and selected pulp from which Invictus Fibre is nude. 
* Mai order will convince vou that we are correct See that each package bears the words "Invictus Fibre." Every ream 

contain* 480 sheets 
This de>ign a guarantee of gitalin . 

CANADA PAPER CO.. LIMITED. 

"Headquarters for high grade Fibre and Manilla Papers" 

Toronto. Montreal. Windsor Mills, P.Q 



Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 

the load yourself with 

The Burr Self-Locking 

le Block Saves the labor of two or three 

000 to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Burr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 




Cap Screws, Set Screws, 
Machine Screws, Cold Pressed 
Nuts, Studs, Coupling Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offioes : Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg 
Vancouver, Rossland 




Proper Heating Essential 

Tensile strength, great durability and facility in welding depend on 
the treatment of the metal in the furnace. 

Only experts handle the iron in the London Mills' Furnaces. This 
is the secret of the regularity of its good quality. 

A trial order will make you a regular customer. a 



London Rolling Mills 




WRIGHT'S 

NO. 10 TRACTION ENGINE 

HEAD LIGHT 




Best 

kind 



l>I' its 

the 



m.tik,-t. Brass 
N^,|. rjau,! 
t >nTCSU ItutruT, 

1 1« .t\ \ Copper 
Nickel Plated 
Reflector, 
throw b a strong 

brilliant sU-.uly 

light over a 
Large area. 
Supplied with 

with O u 
Bracketa ( as 
required. Full 
stock ol wicks 
chimneys, etc. 
alu ays on hand. 



Write us for illustrations and prices. 
MANUFACTURED B^ 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO., - HAMILTON, CAN. 



The Bowmanville Foundry Co., Limited 

Bowmanvllle, Ont 




Makers of Good Goods Only. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Investigation and auditing of all 
classes of accounts undertaken. 
Trading, profit and loss accounts 
and balance sheets prepared. Sets 
of books opened and office systems 
devised in an up-to-date manner. 
Collection of accounts a specialty. 

PERCY P. DAVENPORT 



622 Mclntyre Block, 



WINNIPEC, MAN. 



Square your accounts 

INTERNATIONAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY, Limited 
OTTAWA, - - ONTARIO. 

Manufacturers or strictly high-grade Portland Cement 
made by the most improved method of manufacture in 
existence. Each barrel contains three hundred and fifty 
pounds ot pure Portland Cement with no adulteration. 

The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

Manufacturer! of the celebrated 

'Saugeen Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Prlcei on application. Prompt shipment 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Let us 
Help You 
Increase 
YourBusiness 

Why not go after 

and get the fire brick 
trade in your locality. 

Our expert informa- 
tion is at your com- 
mand and will enable 
you to make this a pay- 
ing line. 

Make this one of the 
New Year resolutions 
and KEEP IT. 



Francis Hyde & Co. 

Contractors 

and 

Foundry Supplies 

31 WELLINGTON ST. 
MONTREAL 



A MATTER OF DOLLARS 

Here you sec the strongest, cheapest and 
best Ladder on the market. Big talk, but we 
stand ready to make good every claim we make 
for our goods. 

There are no nails in this ladder. It is put 
together with screws and rivets and constructed of 
thoroughly seasoned ash and spruce. Durable, 
safe and a money saver. 

That Waggon Jack is a new 

article on the Canadian market 

and italready holds the United 

States market. It holds what 

it raises— because it has double 

acting dogs. 
It is built of steel and malleable iron, there is 
nothing to get out of order about this Jack. Built 
to lift all kinds of buggies, heavy waggons and 
general work. 

SEND FOR PARTICULARS NOW. 

SHIRREFF MANUFACTURING CO 





BROCKVILLE, 
ONT. 




Dennis' Iron Stable Fittings 

Sanitary, Indestructible, Economical 

A good line for the hardware dealer. 

Send for New Stable Fittings Catalogue and 

Price List "A." 

DENNIS IRON & WIRE WORKS, Ltd. 

LONDON, - ONTARIO 



ELECTRIC SIGNS 

advertise you night and day. Without question the cheapest and 
most effective method of advertising to-day. 

We have excellent proposition to make in most Canadian cities 
for merchants to use electric signs. 

Let us hear from you, and we will send you circulars. 

THE MARTEL-STEWART CO., Limited 

MONTREAL, CANADA. 



OUR LINES ARE SELLERS ! 

Why Not Write for Particulars? 

CABLE ADDRESS "SUPERIOR" FARLEY WORKS, SHEFFIELD, ENG 

GEORCE PHILLIPS & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Silverware, Electroplate and Cutlery 

We also make the best Razor on the market. Four exclusive brands with advertised names that will help 
every dealer. It costs a two cent stamp to find out about these solid old country lines which you cannot 
duplicate elsewhere. ALL MONEYMAKERS. 



OFFICE FOR CANADA, PACKARD BUILDING, MONTREAL 



TELEPHONE M 557 



HARDWARE AND METAi. 



Money for You, 

Lots of it 



Yes, there are more dollars in 




retailing Window Glass than some dealers think — and 
most dealers know it. 

Yon certainly are not giving yourself a square 
deal — if you have not seen our prices for spring 
deliveries. Besides, you do save money by importing 
direct. 

These strong cases assure delivery in good order, 
while our facilities assure promptitude. 

We are always glad to quote prices. 

Have you our catalogue ? 



The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 



LONDON 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 




The John Morrow Screw, Limited 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



CELEBRi. tD 



HEINISCH «* 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 




NEW YORK OFFICE. '•• Chioktri St 
NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 



SEYMOUR 
SMEAR CO. 



TKAI» UtlK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 
Standard for over Half a Century. 
"QUALITY unquestioned; 

Each pair of our shears bears th- above trade mark. 




Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS' 
and TAILORS' SHEARS, etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company 

WIEBUSOH * HILOCR, Limited, N EW YOR K Sole Agents 

14 



Latest Cata 
logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your bus'ueu 

card. 




COVERT MFG. CO., 

TROY, N.Y. 

DERBY SNAP 

With Plated Rust Proof and Guarded Spring 

"The Latest and Best." 

For Sale by all Jobbers at Manufacturer's Price 
STRBET PAVINO and SIDEWALKS « SPECIALTY 

SILICA BARYTIC STONE CO. 

OF ONTARIO, Limited. 

Head Office 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills, General Manager 
Ask for quotations for 



Water Proof Floors for 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel- 
lar, 8table Floors, etc- I 



Septio Tanks. 



"The Tool Holder People" 

ARMSTRONG 
BROS. TOOL CO. 

Manufacturers of Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

106 N. Frtnciico Ave.. CHICAGO, ILL- 




GALyAKNG 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DREADNOUGHT 



A HIGH-GRADE ENAMELLED WARE 




Write for Catalogue 



Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 

115-121 Brock Ave. and 79-31 Florence St. 

TORONTO, ONT. 



A.RUDD&CO., St. Helens, Lancashire, England 



Manufacturers of highest grade 





PIA7IFRV niAMHNDS in all _patterns_. Also Circle Bovds. ^BeamComp^sNs^ Gauge 



Glass Cutters, Boxwocd Squares and Laths, Plate Class Nippers, 
Atmospheric Soldering Irons, etc., etc., etc., 



Canadian Agen; : J. B. GIBSONE, P.O. Box No. -*78. MONTREAL 



Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINCS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 

Will close a door against any pn9fl8ure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, pntumitic or 
otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 



"QUALITY UNSURPASSED." 

BAR IRON 



kWVWVWVWWVWWW 



F"or Prompt Shipments "try : 

TORONTO AND BELLEVILLE ROLLINC MILLS, LIMITED 



VI 



ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



When 

the 




Newmarket 

A Favorite for over 
Thirty Years. 



HorSO Clippers are mentioned 
name BURMAN soon crops up. 

It spells Quality and Reliability, and 
carries with it the weight of 36 years 
experience. 

A large stock of Hand Clippers 

Newmarket, Grand, Handicap, etc., 

on hand, also 

a Consignment of our new No. 13 
Power Horse Clipper. 

Just the machine for the owner of one horse. 

Packs into case 17x11x7. Weight 34 lbs. 
All cogs machine-cut from solid. 



Agents In Canada (holding stock) : 




B. & S. H. Thompson & C o., Ltd., Montreal 



No. 18 Power Clipper 



BURMAN & SONS, Ltd., Lee Bank Works, BIRMINGHAM 




Dundas Lumberman 



This is an axe made to suit those who 
not only want a good article, but want to 
know all about it. It is oil tempered 
and left in appearance just as it comes 
out of the oil, and has on one side of axe 
a label that tells all about it. It is, in 
fact, an axe that a customer will buy 
when you are busy waiting on some one 
else. It sells itself. 



The Dundas Axe Works 



DUNDAS, ONT. »• 



continued. 



16 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Commercial Success 




may be attained in 
different ways hy dif- 
ferent men; But — 
there is one sure and 
certain way of corner- 
ing a paying trade in 
the Hardware and 
Metal Business. 

Feature 

The 

Empire 

Queen 

Range 



and your success is absolutely assured. The superiority of 
The Empire Queen is admitted by nearly all practical 
men, while its magnificent appearance rivets a customer's 
attention at once. 

The Empire Queen certainly does look well — cooks 
well— practically sells itself. 



The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co, 



OWEN SOUND, Ontario. 



Limited, 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limited, 238 King St., Winnipeg, Man., 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO.. 126 West Craig St., 
Montreal, Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



A Good Range Saves 
Worry and Bad Cooking. 

A Poor Range is a constant source 
of Annoyance and Disappointment. 



The Joy Malleable Range is among the 
best, to say the least, and its sterling 
malleable iron, double riveted, reinforced, 
air tight construction makes it the Longest 
Liver in the bunch. 

If you want to build up a business institu- 
tion that your grandchildren can point to 
with pride, adopt The Great Joy Range 
for your leader — pin your faith right to 
it— and noother result can follow. What 
think ye? 



1 



■ nv lylFa'a 4T*A 32 Numbers idc Ave., 
tlVI rirU. t-U., TORONTO, ONT. 

TEES& PERSSE CO., - Western Distributors, Winnipeg: 
CHA8. H. FOX, - Agent for British Coumbia, Vancouver. 



"Samson" Milk Cans, Trimmings, Etc. 



'O 




"SAMSON" 



.Now is the time when you should get your 
stock of these goods into shape for spring 
business. 

If you handle the "Samson" line you know 
you have something better than your competitor. 

You know when you recommend "Samson"' 
Milk Cans and Trimmings to your customers 
that the goods will bear out your recommend- 
ations. 

We can ship the finished articles or the 
trimmings promptly. 




•SAMSON" 



THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, 
ST. JOHN, N.B., HAMILTON, CALGARY. 

•EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP" 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



We Have Worked Out Your Problem. 




When you go home at five 
o'clock, there is no reason why 
you should have your after-dinner 
smoke spoiled with a lot of wor- 
ries over little details of your 
business. 

There is no need for you to Jot down memo- 
randa on the back of an envelope for to-morrow. 

If your books were arranged on a proper 
system, they would shoulder all these petty 
details for you — to-morrow morning they would 
show you everything you want to know just at 
the moment you want to know it. 



Business Systems leave petty routine to 
your books. 

Business Systems do the work but leave 
you time to think and plan and act. 



Business Systems leave nothing to chance 
and allow no possibility of anything being for- 
gotten, 

Business Systems enable one clerk to do 
the work of two and to do it more accurately. 



We would like to go into this matter with 
you either in your office or in ours at your 
convenience. 

A request to know more about Business 
Systems, will not obligate you. 

BUSIWEJSS 



MMTTED 
84 S PADINA AVE. 

XORONTO, CANADA 




Peerless Woven Wire Fence 



Here is a fence that will sell. Once up no need for repairs. 
It lasts for years— just what you are looking for. It's horse- 
high, pig-tight and bull-strong. No stock can |get over, 
under or through it. The most unruly animal can't butt it 
down and there are no barbs to tear and injure stock. It's 

WIND AND WEATHER PROOF 

The Peerless lock holds it perfectly rigid and the wires can't 
slipup, down, nor sidewise. Cold weather won't snap it 
and hot weather won't make it sag. It's the greatest thing 
out for farmers, stockmen and all other fence users which 
makes it a red hot proposition for dealers. It comes in rolls 
all ready to put up. It's easy to handle. Write for prices. 

The Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Company, Ltd. 

Dept. J, Hamilton, Out. 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 



WOLVERHAMPTON 



FUSE 



White Countered 

Gutta Percha Safety 

Single and Double 
Tape, etc. 



Sole Canadian sales agents for 
WM. BRUNTON & CO., Wrexham, England 

INSIDE PRICES TO THE TRADE 



JAMES BARBER, Era Works, Sheffield 

Best quality only 
TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY, 

RAZORS, CARVERS, Etc. 

J. H. ROPER 

Canadian Representative 
82 St. Francois Xavier Street - MONTREAL 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOCKEY SKATES 



One point lb nl Jur line 
w.iich we wi .11 io empha- 
size, in addition 10 t lie 

unrivalled q tality, is the 
fact that ii ii a COM- 
I'l 1 1 i; LINE. We have' 
.i skitc for every need, 
usit, whim or fancy. 
In hockey skates we pro- 
duce several patterns, 
some of which are here 
lllu itrated. We make 
them in all styles, both 
with and without puck 
stops and with plain and 
flanged runners. The 
features of our line are 
well known to every hockey- 
player. 

We must apologize far 
not being able to fill all 
orders for our new 
"VELOX" hockey skate 
promptly. We thought we 
were making a sufficient 
quantity to carry us 
through the season, but, 
even though we kn;\v the 
skate's giod qualifies, we 
were ourselves surprised 
at the way in which the 
public look hold. We have 
had to put extra effort 
into turning out the 
' VELOX" with the result 
thai we are now abreast of 
our orders. 




THE "VELOX' 




THE "REGAL' 




THE FEATHERWEIGHT " MIC-MAC" 




THE "STARR 




THE "CHEBUCTO' 




THE 



THE 


" BOYS" 


HIGHEST AWARDS WHEREVER EXHIBITED 
AT INTERNATIONAL AND OTHER EXHIBITIONS 


GOLD 


MEDAL at 


DOMINION EXHIBITION 1S06 



LIMITED 



STARR MFG. C 

Head Office and Works, DARTMOUTH, N.S. 
Branch Office, 126 Wellington St. W., TORONTO 



The "Mic-Mac," stand- 
ard and featherweight pat- 
tern., have lost none of 
their popularity, and the 
siles exceed tho.c of any 
previous season. 

Our hockey -.tick* are 
popular with all players, 
because they are made of 
straight - grain, selected, 
second - growth, yellow 
birch, and because they 
are shaped and balanced 
perfectly. The reputation 
they have for durability 
and playing quality makes 
them easy sellers. 

Our representative is 
now on the road sjliciting 
orders for 1907-08, and 
will call on you shortly, 
but in case you would 
rather not wait far him, 
drop us a line ; we are 
always pleased to answer 
letters. 



The 
"Rex" 
Hockey 
Stick. 




19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Rtgistered Trade Mark 



BETTER THAN EVER 

THE FOUR MAPLE LEAF BRANDS 

BINDER TWINE FOR 1907 

GILT EDGE-650 ft. Pure Manila. 

COLD LEAF— 600-ft. Manila. — ■ - 

SILVER LEAP— 550 ft. Standard Manila. 
MAPLE LEAF-500 ft. Standard. 

Good Material ; Bright, Clean, Smooth, Even CORD, of unusual Length and 
Strength. Specially Treated to make it "Insect Proof." 

Agents wanted in localities where we are not now represented. 
Write us for SAMPLES and our new ROPE and CORDAGE price list. 




THE BRANTFORD CORDAGE CO., Ltd. 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. 




SPADES, SHOVELS, Etc. 

Entrust your trade to the house that 
can supply the "just right" Spades and 

Shovels. 

By getting in touch with 
us you will become ac 
quainted with the favorite 
lines: 



"Peterborough," "Lundy," "Irwin," and 'Hill" 

Send in a postcard for our Catalogue and you will see where we stand. 

The Peterborough Shovel & Tool Company, Limited, Peterborough, Out. 




KEMP'S FACTORY MILK CAN TRIMMINGS 

Are Made to Last 



With roll rim 
bottoms are 
the kind that 
stand the 
wear and 
tear 





Sectional View/ of Bottom 

Prompt attention given 
letter orders 



All Sizes of Tinned Iron in Stock 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, ONT. 

THE KEMP MFG. CO. OF MONTREAL THE KEMP MFG. AND METAL CO., Limited 



58 McGill St., Montreal, Que. 



McDermot Ave. E., Winnipeg, Man. 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE PERCENTAGE OF PROFIT 

A discussion Invited on an Interesting and convincing argument presented In favor of correct bookkeeping by 
Fred. C Larlvlere, President of Amlot, Lecours & Larlvlere, Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants, Montreal. 



Technically, the profits musl be based 
on cost and the percentage of profits 
fixed according to the class, qualitj and 
appearance of the goodgj and this is the 
onlj proper course. In practice, how 
ever, the percentage of profit may be 

< puted indifferent^ on the turnover, 

either on cos! or selling values. Pro 
vided the expenses arc figured on the 
aim basis, the results in dollars and 
cents would be the same. This is onlj 
a transposition of figures with same re 
suits as to the amount involved, for 
nobodj would for a moment doubt that 
dollars and cents are what is looked for 
in the final results, consequently it 
should have the precedence over percent- 
age, which is only an accessory. It is 
a well known fact that bookkeeping 
must he made to suit the requirements 
oi business, and nol business to book- 
keeping. 

As far as I know it is customar] to 
figure the results of a year's business on 
the total amount of goods sold at sell- 
ins; prices ; but in using this method it 
is the business of the merchant, when 
pricing goods, to apply the following 
i ule It he « ishes to realize a profit of 
oil per cent, on selling value he must 
add Hut per cent, on cash value ; if he 
wishes to realize 40 per cent, he must 
add 6fi 2 3 ; if :i.'5 1-.'), he must add all . 
add 2:") ; if 16 2-3 he must add I'll. 

Provision must be made for a per- 
centage of profit to sales and to cap 
ital. There is a wide difference in the 
two 1 will explain by an example 
taken from actual results. A certain 
rn I know, started in business with 
$418.78, the turnover of the year at 
selling prices being #29,210.14 and the 
gross "profits $6,822.28, or '_':>. :>."> per 
cent. ($22,387.86, cost) or equalling 
30.47 per cent, on cost price. The e\ 
penses including interest and bad debts 

well' $2,286 oil oi 7.96 per cent on sales 

at selling- prices, or L0.21 per cent, on 
cost. Now Id us sec if the results are 
the same. 

The profits on : 
$29,210.14, selling value, at 23.35 per 

cqua] $6,822.28. 
$22,387.86, cost value, at .'in. 17 per 
cent., equal $6,822.28. $6,822.28. 

The expenses on : 
$29,210.14 at 7.96 per cent, equal $2,- 

>_'_'. :!^7 Mi at '.'i._M per cent., equal $2,- 
286.60. $2,286.60. Net profits. 

5 15 68 

Therefore the results are the same. 
(he net profits are $4,535,68. \ow let 
a- compare this to capital, which was 
■slls7 v at tin- beginning of business. 
The result in percentage is 1,120.62, 
compared to 15.39 per cent, on selling 
of sales or 30.26 per cent on cost 
price oi goods -old. Which is right ' 
Both are correct in an\ of the ways this 
problem is Retired. 



Capital the Only Investment. 
The above statement is surelj an bvj 

deuce and an uncontestable proof that 
t lie pin chase i il .i iii tain ami ► 1 1 lit I ll 

goods by a merchant m general business 

is not an investment The capital ne 
cessarj foi the general administration 

of a business is the Investment, for cap 
ital not only provides for the purchase 

of g Is, hut also for carrying the book 

debts, the increase of stock, and meet 
nig the general expenses of administra 
tion. If I invest $100 in a business and 
wait till this amount double- itself, it 
is true I will have made UK) per cenl 
on my capital. This would be the in- 
vestment, but it would not represent 
the result of several transaction- of 
buying and selling and the accumulation 
ol profits on each sale. Consequently a 
purchase cannot, properly speaking, be 

an investment. Th : s 1"() per cent, is 




FRED. C- LARIVIERE. 

not the percentage of profits on my 
sales either at cost or selling prices un 
Less it would have been made in only 
one transaction, which is not the case 
generally in business. 

To substantiate this 1 will submit the 
follow ing examples : 

A. buys $11111 woit h ol - 1-. A. -ell- 

B $50 worth for $75, making a profit 
• •I $25. A. purchases $50 worth of 
-..oil-. A. -ell- ('. $T'i worth for $125, 
making a profit oi $50. A. sells 1). bal- 
ance of stock, $J"), for $50, making a 
profit of $25. Total- . Goods bought 
$li50 ; cost price $150 ; selling price 
$250 : profit -Kin. 

A. -old what cost him $150 

-_'")H. realizing a profit of $100, or 
100 per cent, on capital: 66-23 per 
cent, on cost ; and lit per cent, on sell 
ing prices ; and all these percentages are 
collect ; hence the different ways, with 
but otic result of a clear profit of $100 

21 



It should he dcai lv e\ iileni that the act 
ol buying goodfl is not what could I,. 

tei med an investment . 'I he eapit A] 
placed in the business i- tin- invest □ 

1 hope .son i li. i Lntere ted pat 

will send you then \ tews, bo that this 

• 'I . impoi t ant quest ion can be thor 
oughly studied 



GOOD BUYERS AND GOOD 
SELLERS. 
A.1 the recent hardware association 

convention across the line, S Kowell, a 

• St - I. "in- jobber, delivered a short ad 
dress in which he made his hearers un 

dei stand that jobbers have their trou 

ble and emphasized the tact that sell 
ing was a much more important opera 
tion than buying. He -aid in part : 

"God have mercj on the ma n who is a 
good buyer, but who cannot sell the 
goods he buys, h you are spending 7.") 
Per cent, of your time on buying and 25 
per cent, on selling, reverse the ratio 
and devote at least 75 per cent, of your 
effort to selling. Every head of a mer- 
cantile house must be a school tea< 
He must be teaching his clerks and his 
"hole foree up to date ideas on sales 
manship. There is not 5 per cent, dif- 
ference in the cost of the hardware 

Stock, item lor item, of the poorest 

buyer and the best buyer in the State 

of Wisconsin, but stocks do vary 26 t.. 
oil per cent, in value as to their assort 
ment and character. There is nothing 
more untrue than the old statement 
that 'goods well bought are half sold, 
if well bought means cheaply." 



RULES LEADING TO SUCCESS. 

'lake as much interest in your em 

plover's business a- if it were your 
own. 

Do your work well today you won't 
have to do any of it over again to- 
morrow. 

Do not expect to get all you can and 
nothing. Do a little more work 
than is demanded. 

Do not let your thoughts be always 
woolgathering n yon expect to earn an 
increase of salary. 

He prompt. Show that you havi 
interest in your work above the desire 
for an extra half hour in bed in the 
morning-. You can't come down half an 
hour Late every morning and impress 
yOUI employer with the idea that 
are a wide-awake, active man or woman 
with an interest in your work. 

lie cheerful and willing. \ -ullen 

countenance is not pleasant to look upon 
by either an employer or a custi 
Remember, your pulling power with a 
customer is one ol your assets. The 
reserve will he your loss. He courteous 
Do not thrust your trouble- and inhar- 
mony upon those around you. It is a 
investment. 



HARDWARE AND METAl. 




PREVENTING FROST ON SHOW 
WINDOWS. 

J Quinn, ventilating expert with 
Clufl Bros., Toronto, Canadian ag 
for t In- Thomas Acme Air Washer [or 
ventilating buildings, in answer to a re- 
quest for information regarding the pre- 
vention Of frost on Show windows, writes 
follows for Hardware and Metal : 

"The physical conditions which create 
frosl on window panes are exactly the 
same as those which create moisture on 
cold water pipes in summer time, viz., 
warm air carrying its extreme comple- 
ment of moisture comes in contact with 
a cold body and is reduced in tempera- 
ture, rendering it incapable of carrying 
the same percentage of moisture, and 
what is more natural than that the ex- 
cess of the latter should he deposited 
where the Chilly process takes place, 
viz.. in this case, on the window pane. 
We anticipate th.u some considerable 
difficult} will he experienced in making 
a window space sufficiently tight from 
the inner store to render impossible the 
circulation of warm air from the latter.. 
In this connection we would emphasize 
that, if absolutely still air cm ,>e ob- 
tained between the inner and cuter 
glass," very little difficultv will he ex- 
perienced from frost even on the oldest 
days, and in tins connection it has been 
found that double glass set in the fame 
SOSh, leaving a space ol sav l.' or _! 
inches between the panes, and having 
the mints all around the four sides 
made as tight as possible, has given 
very good satisfaction, and apart from 
this construction we are not by any 
means sure that good results a.i he ob- 
tained under other circumstances. 

"We do not know of any solution or 
wash for (jutting on the window panes 
to prevent a formation of frost." 

DOES THE WINDOW EARN 
WAGES? 

In conducting his business from one 
year's end to another, the retail dealer 
must t.ike into account the elemental 
principles upon which all trade is based 
— he must keep a strict tabulation of all 
expenditures, must know exactly at tin- 
year's end "what his receipts have been, 
and thus tie enabled to arrive at his 
percentage of profit . Perfect business 
methods, says the Sporting Goods Deal- 
er, consists in keeping these different 
transactions or items on a money-mak- 
ing plane. Th.it is, when a certain bill 
of goods is bought, it should lie sold at 
a figure to allow a certain profit ; when 
a salesman is employed, Hie proprietot 
naturally expects him to bring hack in- 
to the cash box tin- amount of his sal- 
ary, and some more , if advertising is 
carried in the daily papei elsewhere, a 
full return for money expended is look- 
ed for. These various returns often do 
not come up to expectations, for one 
cause or another, and this marks the 
degrees of success attained by different 
merchants. Now there is one phase ol 
the retail dealer's business that he is 
apt to he careless about and then 
not realize a full rel urn on the expendi- 



ture— thai is the display window. The 
cost of maintaining this exhibit is a just 

charge lii the wage account, exactly as is 
the salar\ of a clerk- or salesman. With- 
out windows the rent would lie much 
less, so there is every reason for giving 
special attention to making it a busi- 
ness-bringing feature. The show win- 
dows ma\ he considered an employe, 
and an expensive one. The time of an 
assistant to dress the window, the C0S1 
of working tools and paraphernalia are 
some of the expenses that nun- be charg- 
ed against it. The question remains, 
does the window selk enough goods to 
warrant this expense'' With the aid of 
counter hooks the dealer can keep track 
of the work of his salesmen and deter- 
mine what returns they are bringing. In 
the case of the show window this is 
not so easy. More time and continued 
experimenting is necessary to investi- 
gate the business brought into the house 
by the outside exhibit. 

The proprietor expects his salesmen to 
he constantly bright, pleasing and wide- 
awake ; he should make his display win- 
dow the same. There are unlimited pos- 
sibilities open to the dealer who consid- 
ers the window dressing proposition in 
a serious light. Uy a careful record of 
the sales of each class of sporting goods 
dining a specified period, and comparing 
one with the other, bearing in mind 
when and how the different goods were 
featured in display, he can form a very 
satisfactory estimate of the benefits be- 
ing obtained from this method of pub- 
licity. As has been staled time and 
time again, the display window is prob- 
ably the dealer's best business getter. 
Unlike the salesmen and other employes, 
the window may he asked to work day 
and night, and there are no holidays or 
vacations to be considered. Hut again, 
unlike good employes, the window needs 
constant looking after and shaking up. 
It is apt to get Slovenly and out-of-date 
unless proper attention is bestowed up- 
on it. Its success, therefore, rests with 
the dealer himself. It is up to him. 

TEE IMPORTANCE OF DISPLAY. 

It is just as necessary that the hard- 
ware merchant should dress up his win- 
dow and put on a "front" as it is for 
the haberdasher or the dn goods deal- 
er. There is money in the show win- 
dow, and it rests with each dealer to 
get it out. "Put your best foot for- 
ward" in commercial life as you do in 
the social world. 

Don't, above all things, make an at- 
tempt to make a display unless you in- 
tend to do it right. Don't bundle a 
confused mass of articles into your win- 
dow and "let it go at that." .Make it 
a show window and not a "holy show" 
window. If you think you haven't the 
time or you lack the knack of arranging 
the articles in an artistic manner, en- 
courage one of youi" clerks to try and 
develop ability in this line. It will he 
money well invested. What so quickly 
engages the public eye as a lastefullv 
arranged store window 7 It acts as a 
magnet which draws the elusive coin to 
your til! 

99 



CARD WRITING. 

It is not such a difficult matter to 
write show cards, hut many merchants 
have never made the attempt- which 
might show them that they are capable 
of producing a really respectable card 
by means of the pen or brush. Some 
merchants hardly use cards at all, 
ot tiers rely upon the rubber-stamp out- 
It. Clerks who might eventually de- 
velop great ability in the show-card line 
are hampered by the instruction of em- 
ployers who cling to old ideas and fail 
to see the possibilities of new ones. 
Then there are the men who attempt the 
work without any apparent desire for 
excellence. Their crudity makes them 
an exhibit which attracts attention— 
and fails to attract custom. To the first 
class of card-writers we would say : 
Learn show-card writing, and to the 
second class we would say : Learn show- 
card writing. 

By this is meant not necessarily the 
highest form of card-writing, which at 
the present day has come to be even a 
profession in itself, hut the propel way 
to make a card, no matter how plain or 
simple it is. It is impossible in one 
lesson to teach show-card writing', but a 
few primary suggestions may be help- 
ful. 

One of the first causes of poor work is 
a failure to appreciate the value of sim- 
plicity. In almost every case the plain 
card is the best, and it is the first which 
should be studied. But so-called "fancy" 
lettering, and scrolls and furbelows have 
a fascination for some people, and as pro- 
duced by them they are an abomination 
to others. They cannot be read at a 
glance, sometimes, indeed they are next 
to indecipherable. Legibility is a prime 
requisite in a show-card; anything hinder- 
ing it should he most carefully avoided 
In the same class with "fancy" schemes 
may be placed old-fashioned styles of 
let t ering— not the genuine "old styles," 
v. Inch are among the best letters in use 
to-day, but the freak fashions which ap- 
peared in type, roughly speaking, be- 
tween the years 1850 and 1890, and 
which even yet, in some localities, the 
unfortunate country editor is compelled 
to employ. 

Taking it all round, rountrv news- 
papers although a good, thing to support, 
ale a bad place to look for good type 
faces, but the large city dailies and the 
nagazines which at some time or other 
reach the most out-of-the-way part of. 
the country, contain models which every 
dealer having to do with window-cards 
would do well to study, choose from and 
copy. Of course in most cases a type 
printed letter must he modified to a 
certain extent when used for show-card 
work It always pays to do the work 
well, but it doesn't pay and isn't neces-' 
an to spend the time on a temporary 
price-card that it would take to letter 
a permanent sign. Show-card writing 
and sign-writing are two different trades 
—or professions, for you can be an ::it- 
ist in either of them— and the very best 
cards ale written by some of Hie fast- 
est workmen. 



HARDWARE AND METAl 




BIG YEAR IN SPORTING GOODS. 

Dealers from various parts of the 
country report 1906 to have beea the 
hesi season in the hi-tory of the trade 
in Canada, the increases in the volume 
of trade reported, averaging from 10 
id .")() per cent, the general prosperity, 
and tlie fad thai most people have 
had money l<> spend on amusements and 
recreation, being Largely responsible 
for the growth of this branch of trade. 

Winter sporting goods Boid partic- 
ularly well during December, one To- 
ronto firm reporting the sale of over 
500 toboggans ranging in price from 
$1.50 i" $7.50, llir average being about 
$5.00. Another sporting goods dealer 
disposed of over 200, selling 25 on one 
Saturday before Christmas. A fea 
ture of i lie toboggan trade lias been 
liif increased demand from the smaller 
towns and cities where this * > I * I time 
sporl is gaining remarkable favor. 

Snowshoes have also sold in fair 
quantities, )although the demand fcnn 
not been so great as a year ago, o\vin fe ' 
io the laige number sold last winter 
not used because of the lack of 
-now. 'riic demand this year has been 
better in the country districts than in 
the larger cities. On the other hand, 
skits have sold better in the larger 
the customers being chiefly the 
children of the wealthier citizens. 

Ice skates have soltl remarkably 
well, shortages being reported in many 
cts. Much stock was carried over 
from 1905, hut the demand this season 
has been so great that stocks will be very 
light when the present season closes, 
Salts, w ill of ct mse. conlinu ! mil il 
the end of February. Hockey skates 
Inn c met w it h the gri atesl demand.: 
A \ei> profitable side line with many 

dealers has been boots lor hockev 
skates, one dealer staling that he hail 
sold 1,000 paiis of shoes already this 
year. Sweaters, mocassins, etc.. have 
also been in active demand. The con- 
tinued popularity of roller skating has 
made it possible tor many dealers to 
work up a fair trade in this line, the 
Harold A. Wilson Company, Toronto. 
having sold 600 pairs within the last 
few months. The Henley anil Union 
Hardware Co.'s lines were the chief 
sellers. The holiday trade in air rifles 
also very good, while revolvers con- 
tinue to have steadj sale. 

The Ira]) shooting season is now on. 
and the demand for ammunition hi 
\ei\ active, lilies also selling steadily. 
A iiue which sells largely in the Iran 
shot tine season. is the blue rock 
imitation birds, manufactured by J. 
Bowron, Hamilton. Out. The Domin- 
ion Cartridge Co.'s ammunition i also 
a i opular seller. Many dealers are 
pushing mm supplies f r the dif- 



Iflfllt gUD (dubs which make a s| eelal 
ty of t rap shot I ing, and for I be next 
couple "t months, the bos! possibil 
for making tra'e is in pu hiii" shcol 
ing goods. 

t lymnasium supplies and ft ncing 
enods, have of (inn se, sold w ell e\ cv 
since coltl weather arrived, (here being 
a steady increase noticeable in both of 

these blanches id' tin- trade. 

Dealers are now preparing to gel af- 
ter the business placed by golf, base 
ball, cricket, lacrosse, football and ten- 
nis clubs, the present being an oppor 
tune time to circularize ami make per- 
sonal calls on the secretaries of these 

organizations, quoting prices mi the 

supplies necessary for the coming sea- 
son's spoils. Preparations are also 
being made for an active trade in boats, 
cant es, lishine I ckle, I he season for 

which commences about the middl ■ of 

of May. Camp supplies will be another 
line which will demand early attention. 



EARLY ENGLISH GUNPOWDER. 

A bucket containing bullets and gun 
powder has been discovered in the roof 
of Durham Castle, where i1 is believed 
to have been walled up about the year 
Kill, when the castle was being pie 
pared to withstand a Scottish raid. The 
bullets are molded spheres of two sizes, 
and, according to the analyses of Messrs 
Silberrad and Simpson, consist of a lit- 
tle over fill per cent, of lead, with iron 
and silver, and traces of bismuth, 
arsenic, and antimony. The gunpowder 
is not granulated like that of the pres- 
ent day, ami was evidently prepared by 
simply mixing the ingredients. It con- 
tains about 1 per cent! of moisture, and 
the proportion of the constituents cal- 
culated on I he drv powder is practical- 
ly identical with that of the black nun- 
powder of to-day, viz., nitre, 75 per 
cent.; carbon, 15 per cent., and sulphur. 
HI per cent. It is pointed out by 
.Messrs. Silbeirad and Simpson thai 
this is a remarkable fact, since the gun- 
powders made in England at that tune 
contained ,t considerably larger amount 
of sulphur. The only gunpowdei with 
the modern proportions in use in .the 
seventeenth century was Prussion mus- 
ket powder, ami hence it is suggested 
thai the Durham powder was probably 
of Prussian origin. — Knowledge. 

GUARANTEED FOR THREE YEARS 
In the future the Horton Manufactur- 
ing Co., Bristol. Conn., have decided to 

guarantee their "Bristol" steel fishing 
rods for three years, instead of one 
year, as heretofore. The three-year guar- 
antee applies to all "Bristol" rods sold 
since October I st, L906J thai is. rods 
which were shipped from their factory 
since that date This is an 'excellent 
proof of their faith in the rods and 
should make a good selling argument for 
the dealers. 

23 



AUTO SUPPLIES. 

There seems l» be a unai mm \ t .1 

■ i iiiimi as to the ad\ antage of putt ing 

111 a. line id' auto at or *up 

in the hardware store in citii 

the l|e||| size. BajB t ie Han . 

I '• ,m ■ - ' Ma j.i/.ine, U hie i ha - been 

making an investigation of the results 

secured b\ Initial States retail dealers 
v, ho Inn e stocked I he line. 

Ill small towns where there are only 
one or two automobiles il is obvious, 
that the dialer would i ol liud il a<l 
\ ailtageous to put in a line, ami on the 
other extreme are large cities where 
specialty stores control mosl of this 
line. Between, however, are many cit- 
ies wherein the enterprising dealer can 
gradually feel his way ; ml pill iii a 
stock of the smaller supplies. As the 
automobilists become informed of the 
dealer carrying such a sloe'; hi- trade 
oughl Io pick up. 

As a i ule t he u an w ho runs a car 
has money Io spend for many of the new 

things that are being constantly broughl 
out. Something aboul hi- car needs 
replacing, now ami then spark plugs 
give < ut, batteries become exhausted, 

tin- burst, some of the wrenches or 
other tools break or gel lost, pumps 

give out. carbide oils ami greases 
being constantly used up, lamps gel in 
siuash-ups. speed indicator- frequently 
V I hold of a man's fancy, ami possess 
' in- he n usi , mid so on with alm< -• 
no end. The automobile, unlike the 
I'icvcle. is nd likely to be a fad; every 
indication poirts I ■ :t large acct's ion 
Io the ranks of auloists. Tt therefore 
behooves the wise dealer to gel ill on 
llie " "■• ■ •""! '' ■' ' and " •_■ 

ii]> ' ' with I he busihes . 



CRTME INCREASES BUSINESS. 

Retailers of hit-aims m Pittsburg have 

for .-oine weeks carried on a 1 remendous 
business in G rearms and other weapons 
of defence as a result of a long series of 
burglaries and other crimes that has 
visited the community. Revolvers for 
both home and pocket have been in greal 
demand. It is noticed Unit the ideas re- 
garding pocket weapons have experienced 
i change, for the larger calibres have 
had the largest calk II seems thai the 
32-calibre revolver is not considered suf- 
lieientlv effective by the people of Pitts- 
burg who wish lo be prepared to receive 
midnight prowlers. 



TO BROWN GUN BARRELS. 
Take I ounce muriate tincture of steel 
1 ounce spirits of wine. ; ounce muriate 
of mercurv, \ ounce strong mtne acid, 
| ounce blue stone, 1 quart water. Mix 
well and allow to si and -'in days to 
amalgamate. After the oil or grease 
has been removed from the barrels by 
lime the mixture is laid on liglitU- with 
a sponge even ten hour-. It should be 
scratched oh with a steel wire brush 
night and morning until the barrels are 
dark enough ; and then the acid i- de- 
stroyed by pouring on the barrels boil- 
ing water, and continuing io rub them 
until nearly cool. If the barrels are of 
laminated steel do no' dilute Uk acil 
so much. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RETAIL HARDWARE ASSOCIATION NEWS 



Official noivs of the Ontario and Western Canada Associations will be published In this department, 
dence regarding association matters should be sent to the secretaries. If for 
publication send to the Editor of Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 



All correspon- 



WESTERN DEALERS TO ARMS. 
The following circular has been scut 
lo the four hundred members of the 

Western Retail Hardware Dealers' As- 
sociation by Secretarj McRobie, and if 
eaeli member does Ins part as well as 
the energetic "Mae." the vigorous pro- 
tests of the "four hundred." following' 
the action of thousands of hardware, 
dry goods and other merchants in other 
parts of Canada, should make certain 
the withdrawal of the Tost master Gen- 
eral's proposed legislation. 

A Vigorous Letter. 

You have probably read in the trade 
journals or the daily press of the pro- 
posed regulation regarding a new parcel 
post c.O.d. collection system 

Do vim realize what this means to the 
trade'' If vou do, then we ask you as 
merchants whose business is jeopardized 
to wake up and defeat this iniquitous 
measure, Such a system, if put in 
force, would encourage farmers and 
townspeople to send to the departmental 
stoies and have their purchases sent by 
mail c.o.d.. the local postmasler col- 
lecting the hill and returning the money. 

We want vou to write your local mem- 
ber of Parliament urging him to see the 
Postmaster-General, and oppose the 
proposed system ; also, personally write 
the Postmaster-General, protesting 
against the measure ; interview Hie edi- 
tor of your local paper, and arouse his 
interest", pointing out to him the loss lie 
will sustain eventually in advertising, 
etc., if the measure goes through. 

The parcel post question is an im- 
portant matter Mail order houses in 
the I nited States secured similar legis- 
lation, but it was repealed owing to the 
activity of the members of (he Retail 
Hardware and other associations in 
flooding the Postmaster-General with 
protests. 

Show that you are alive to your in- 
terests by protesting now, and bv so 
doing you will not only ward off the 
present danger, but you will make the 
law-makers realize thai measures affect- 
ing the interests of thousands of mer- 
chants cannot be sacrificed in order to 
satisfy the grasping desires of depart- 
mental stores. 

All merchants should stand firmly to- 
gether and combat this legislation, We 
therefore trust that you will take this 
matter up with your fellow dealers lo- 
cally, and write both your local mem- 
ber and the Postmaster-General before 
the 1st of February. (No postage stamp 
is required on letters sent the Postmas- 
ter-General). Yours truly, 
.J. K. McKobie, A. .1. Falconer, 

Secy.-Treas. President 

PS. Don't forgel the association's 
annual meeting which will be held on 
Tuesday morning, February 12th, at !i 
o'clock' in the Scott Block, 271 Main 
St., Winnipeg. 

A GOOD EXAMPLE. 

Th.it the hardware trade is alive to 
the danger of the legislation outlined by 
Hie Postmaster-General in Parliament 
on Dee. 7 last, is proven by the ener- 



getic manner in which they have taken 
up our suggestion that thev write let- 
ters of protest to their local member of 
Parliament as well as to the Postmas- 
ter-General. 

The trade realizes that the proposal 
to establish a parcels post c.o.d. col- 
lection system is inspired b\ the depart- 
mental store millionaires and the retail 
dealers are not willing to lie down and 
be trampled upon without showing that 



not in the association in UiiMi, has for- 
warded the $3 fee to cover the member- 
ship fee for 1907, is J. L. Fenn, Sons. 
& Co., Braccbridge, a wholesale and re- 
tail firm which is not afraid to put its 
shoulder to Hie wheel and do their share 
of pushing in the interests of the trade 
as a whole. They say : 

"We might say that we are strongly 
opposed to a measure such as is pro- 
posed by the Postmaster-General, and 



Draft Form of Letter. 



l HOT 



To the Honorable Mr. Lemieux, 

Postmaster General, Ottawa. 

Dear Sir,— We understand that you are preparing an 
amendment to the law providing for the existing parcels 
post system, the said amendment, being intended to pro- 
vide for the collection on delivery of parcels. Such a 
system would enable mail order houses to send goods 
c.o.d. to any part of the country in competition with local 
retailers. 

The large depart mental stores are already injuring 
local merchants to a tremendous extent and any change 
in the postal laws which would favor them would be a 
great injustice to the thousands of merchants who have 
their capital invested in the small towns and cities 
throughout Canada, aiding by their presence, their en- 
ergy and their taxes in the up-building of the small com- 
munities upon which Canada's future prosperity must 
depend. 

We do not ask for any special privilege and protest 
against the mail-order houses being given any favors. 
The proposed legislation would lend to reduce the num- 
ber of retailers, thus destroying competition, depreciat- 
ing the value of real estate in the towns and having a 
similar effect upon the farming districts, as well as tend- 
ing to decrease the opportunities for pleasure enjoyed by 
the fanner's family. The deserted farm districts of the 
New England States arc an object lesson to avoid. 

We trust that you will see the fairness of our argu- 
ment that the legislation would be detrimental to the 
continued progress and development of this fair Domin- 
ion and we would ask that you reconsider your announced 
intention of introducing the proposed amendment. 
Yours very truly. 



they are men capable of upholding their 
rights. 

Numerous hardware dealers in Ontario 
have written commending the active 
Campaign being conducted by the On- 
tario Retail Hardware Association, and 
many are forwarding their membership 
fees to the organization, which is ac- 
tively working in their interests. 

One oi the new firms which, although 
24 



we will do all we can to assist, the as- 
sociation to protest against such legis- 
lation. We wish the association every 
success in anything they undertake to 
assist the retail trade." 

Charles Richardson, the manager of 
the Dominion Cement. Paint ami pool' 
mi: Company, died last week at his 
-om' s residence in Toronto. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Merely Introductory. 

There lias been more unadulterated 
nonsense written about "advertising" 
(hiring the last decade than on anj 
other subjeci of interest 60 mankind 
always excepting, of course, "line" 
Suicide" ami "The Annexation of 
Canada by the United Stale-,." 

All Advertising Good. 

Mr. Retailer: jump in right now and 
adveitise if you've never done it be- 
fore! Don't be barred out of the pub- 
licity columns of your local papers be- 
cause you can'1 write as pretty an ad. 
as the fellow round the corner. An old 

Scol had just swallowed a ij'lass of 
whiskey when a croney inquired: "Is 
that good whiskey, Sandy '" 

"Good whiskey!" wrath fully ejacu- 
lated the old man. "All whiskey is 
good; hut some brands are better than 

1 fliers." 

Despite the assertions of many ad- 
vertising experts 1 am inclined to think 
that all advertising is good, hut some 
ads. are far more effective than others. 

Even when John Smith merely declares 
that he has a. certain line of goods for 
John Smith is nol producing bid 
advertising. I have studied the meth- 
ods ' f advertisers all oxer the British 
Empire nml the United Rtntes, and T 
have yei to see an ad. which could be 
considered as damaging to the business 
of the man who produced it. The moral 

is double-barrelled: advertise and— 

I i ep iii advert ising. 

The Fundamental Essential. 

The primary essentia] for ihe re- 
tailer, who produces his own copy, is 
:i thorough knowledge ( f b's business 
its w ants. Sen ;• ef the I est adver- 
copy 1 've seen was produced se\ - 
era! years ago by a Chicago retnil»r. 
That copy was so strong and effective 
thai the gentleman referred to cleared 

a rich fortune in a few years. lie hi 
came somewhat careless regarding the 
management of his business. He I6si 
a knowledge id' its needs, hut still con- 
tinued to produce the advertising 
Rood, strong stuff it was. too; hut tack- 
ing knowledge of the wants of his busi- 
ness, the copy has lost much of its old- 
time power. 

Never Tell a Lie 

Truth is more necessarv in your ad- 
vertising copy than in a preacher's 
discourse. Don'l exaggerate. The 
merchant who makes exaggerated state- 
ments regarding his goods strikes com- 
mon-sense people in the same way 
as the fellow who swaggers along the 
1 in a loud suit. "There's noth- 
ing in him." they say referring to the 
swaggerer ami. well — enough said. 



A good way to judge your cop} is to 

lea\ e il aside for a day or two and I hen 
1 e\ ise it. You 'II find, as a general 
rule, that you have spread yourself 
toe much. You'll he able lo strengthen 

\<nn copy 111 almost every ease b\ cut- 
ting out a few sentences. 

Study Your Trade. 
This is an important point thai most 

retailers seem to overlook. They pro- 
duce ads. in a kind id' happy-go-lucky 
way without studying their customers 
at all. Fancy yourself where the other 
fellow is occasionally. 

Women Are Landed Differently. 

Be ' ' peppery ami to t he point ' ' 

when writing ads. you wish to ap eil 

to men. I hit don 'l talk to 

women thai wav. A woman wauls to 



1 id do not need I aki- a profit 

f( 1 t In- maintenance of a wife ami 

children. Ii is imi my dutj to inform 

ihe public thai ' w;IJ 

-hniiW Um withdrawn from them, as I 

nin about to be married. They will. 

. 01 e. lL, u.ell lo make t hen 

:.l Ihe old rale. - ' The 

1 1 suit of this unique proclamat ion was 

thai such a run on ihe shop ensued 

during the next few days thai the 
•• made money enough to pay Ihe 
expenses id' his wedding on a vcrW 
lavish scale ami leave a snug bank BC 
ii llllt besides. 

Vlerchants who advertise in their local 
papers should stir un the editors to do 
something for Hie town's business on 
their own account. The accompanying 
display is a reduced reproduction ol a 
elation call Ii deep .md eight 

across Ihe Ion of the front pa 
Kent ville, N.S , paper. In I lie sami 
sue the editor said : 

"Several of ! he othei (owns are hold 

ing or have held a merchant's day tins 
season and as will lie seen elsewhere in 
this issue the Kentville merchants have 
fallen into line and are prepared to 
meei ihe outside competition. Every 





KENTVILLE MERCHANTS 




All Stores Open 

Every 

Evening Until 

Christmas 


Are prepared to meet ALL the Outside Competition 


Every Day a Merchants Day from now until Xmas 


All the Merchants are PUTTING FORTH EVERY EFFORT to supply 
your wants with the best goods for the least money. Visit the 
business centre of the valley and get your money's worth. 









.see the name of the articles and the 
pi ne righl at a glance. Then a detail- 
ed account of the article will- interest 
her after ihe price has. 

Good Intentions. 

I. intended lo criticise two ads. in 
this article; but these general remarks 
seemed to l:e necessary. In another is- 
sue we'll have something to say about 
-las. Simmonds & Co. 's ad. which we con- 
sider just about as gi od as any we have 
seen for a long time. Some practical 
ads. used some time ago by 0. M. Hod- 
son will also come in for a word of 
commendation. We will aiso reproduce 
a pretty strong ad. forwarded by J). 
Brocklebank & Son. 

Have anv id her dealers samples of 
advertising matter to send for criti- 
cism .' 

T..T.S. 

ORIGINAL ADVERTISING. 

An original form of advertising 
comes from Russia, where a retail 
dealer recently circulated the following 
at'iH uucemeni among b's customers: 
"The reason why T have hitherto been 
able to sell goods s 1 much 1 ' eaper 
than anybody else is thai I am a bache- 

25 



day from now on is Merchants day in 
Kentville. During the next two weeks 
we respectfully request our readers to 
peruse the advertisements in the Chron- 
icle very carefully. Every one will find 
something interesting." 

This is a good line. The Nova Seot- 
ians are to be congratulated and mer- 
chants in other pails of Canada should 
give their local publishers a pointer. 
This kind of thing shows a town is 
awake and gives the outsiders an im- 
pression that their trade is appreciated. 
It might also stir up a little latent 
civic pride and that's what is badly 
needed in a good many Canadian towns 

GET THERE OR GET LEFT. 

"1 don't see." said John dunes, the 
hardware dealer, 'how dames Smith 
gets so much mure of the furnace busi 
ness id' this locality than I do. I sureh 
am better lilted In take care of it than 
he is." 

"Nun make the mistake." said his 
friend, "in this strenuous age, of -up 
posing that business always comes t.. 
those who are most capable of taking 
eaiv of it . < in the coni rai v . they are 
generally passed in the race, as in your 
case, bv those who make the mosl 
strenuous endeavors to secure the same. 
In other words, present dav commercial 
SUCCeSS i- a case of fighl rather than 
lit." 



HARDWARE AND M E T A l 



Stoves and Tinware 



CLEANING A FURNACE. 

.il work of Furnace instal 
d and the designing work— that is, 
making the plans are now widely sep 
arated in manj establishments and often 
times an engineer, while thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the details of furnace 
work as they are Laid out on paper, still 
knows little of the practical work of in- 
stallation, and the mistakes that are 
made not only by the mechanics, bul i>\ 
those who lay out the work. A man 
who probably spends mole of his time 
over the drafting board than with the 
hammer or snips, recently told the fol 
lowing story in the .Metal Worker, which 
may he of interest to both blanches oi 
the trade. 

The Base of the Chimney. 
Several events led up to my taking 
upon myself the task of cleaning the 
furnace in my cellar. I had spent a 

somewhat Lengthy vacation at a better 
watering place than I could afford and 

was unable to stand the financial strain 
of having a real authorized furnaceman 

come in. but I wish I had. After this 
one the rest of the excuses are unneci - 
sary. 1 went down to the task with my 
old clothes on and succeeded in discon- 
necting the smoke pipe. I found in so 
doing that the builder had left a square 
hole in the chimney which when the 
furnaceman came around he blocked 
with lire clay. I scraped all of this out 
and after 1 had emptied the soot out of 
the smoke pipe and found that it was 
sound, turned my attention to removing 
the accumulation of soot from the chim- 
ney. This was not built as I should like 
to see it, for I certainly believe a chim- 
ney would give better service if there 
a space at the bottom below the 
smoke connection so that soot can fall 
down and be removed through an open- 
ing in the. chimney near the basement 
floor. This opening should, of course, 
be thoroughly blocked up with lire clay 
when the fire is first started, otherwise 
the 'di aft is sine to lie poor. 

Readily Cleaned Register Boxes. 
'The next thing to do was to take off 
all the hot air pipes so that 1 could re- 
move the bonnet. This was not much 
of a task, as the different Lengths had 
been soldered together, but the joint 
between the base of the register box and 
the elbow of the run had just been 
shoved together, as was also true of the 
connection to the bonnet. I find that 
the furnaceman in hanging the pipes had 
not been careful to secure as good an 
alignment as he could and also that the 
pitch of the pipes varied considerably, 
in some instances the pitch being gi 
er at the farther end than near the 
furnace. The rcgi tei boxes on the 
first floor - were all taken out and clean- 
ed and the accumulation of dirt and 
dust in them certainly was asti 
I believe if furnacemen generally knew 
how much trouble it take- to clean a 
tei box which has the connection 
light pipe made by cutting and 



bending over the end of the pipe, in- 
stead of double-seaming it. thej would 

be willing to paj the slight additional 
expense, for the latter is certainly a 
great improvement and one which is ap 
pi eciated l>\ t he houses ife 

Accessible Cold Air Duct. 

When 1 came to lift the bonnet oil I 

found that instead of using clean g I 

sand in the sand ring, coarse gravel 
and dirt had been used instead, which 
when dry blew over the cellar to a con- 
siderable extent and called forth re 
marks on the part of the housewife as 
to what a dirty thing a furnace is. The 
castings 1 found had an accumulation of 
rust, which, while not thick, still was 
considerable, and when I thought of 
brushing this down into the cold air 
pit at the bottom 1 wondered how 1 
could ever get it out, as the cold air pit 
was built in the cellar floor with a con- 
crete top. Not wishing to take the 
whole furnace down I concluded to let 
the dirt remain, but I do think it a very 
unwise practice, particularly in a first 
class job, not to leave an opening so 
that the pit under the finance can be 
cleaned as well as the cold air box. The 
greatest objection to furnaces is the 
dust, and if means were taken for re- 
moving this dust periodically there 
would lie much less to complain of. In 
this furnace I am going to have such an 
opening made another year, and feel 
confident that 1 will be amply repaid 
for the expense." 



STOVE SALESMANSHIP. 

What are you in business for > The 
old answer, "to make money," is too 
loose and indefinite, and needs to be 
qualified to be of any benefit. The meth- 
ods "by which you made money last year 
may seem utter EoflJ Co ; >u comparing 
them with the methods adopted for this 
year. 

A merchant should always be after 
profits and any proposition not likely to 
ensure the getting of such profits is not 
in these days good business. Do not 
let any condition of competition, local 
or otherwise, switch you from this 
idea. At times it seems almost Lmpos 
sible to maintain business on this basis 
because of some competitive factor, but 
bear in mind that the successful mer- 
chant is he who meets the condition 
without sacrificing his present or future 
interest. An eass solution to the prob- 
lem is to do what others do. but this 
is oftentimes unprofitable. 

The next question which would Large 
ly aid you in the hunt for perpetual 
profit is salesmanship. The ordinary 
conception of salesmanship is the man- 
ner and argument which a salesman 
puts up when confronted bj a possible 
customer. We might think of it as some 
clever trick which a salesman only dis- 
plays when a victim arrives. But it is 
;i great mistake, as the class of goods 
should lie studied very closely, compar- 
ing them intelligently with everal other 

2t> 



well known lines. Procure the exclusive 

agency of some well known sto\es and 
heaters and give your undivided atten- 
tion to this particular line. 

Salesmanship includes everything that 
tends to advance the business. Suppos 
ing there is a lannh I hat wants or can 
be made to want, a stove. Yon have 
the sto\e. Salesmanship is the con 
meeting link between that family and 
your stove. Whatever exercises an in 
lluence, good, bad or indifferent, upon 
the transfer of you] stove to that buyer 
is the part of the salesmanship of your 
institution and must lie examined, 

judged and adjusted from that stand 
point. A dingj store front discounts 
the salesman's argument. Many spoil it. 
A dirty delivery wagon is also a very 
poor sort of an imitation to call again. 
A coat of fresh paint often benefits 
trade more than a cut price. What hap- 
pens after the buyer reaches the article 
required — the merit of the thing, the 
argument, the price and the terms — are 
the points that elineh the sale. 

RENOWN STEEL RANGE. 
The Guelph St«>\e Company will en- 
large their plant to accommodate the 
new line of steel ranges which they are 
preparing to manufacture. N. L. Stewart 
manager, and M. Kelly, the superintend- 
ent, returned from Detroit last week, 
after completing a deal for tin; purchase 
of the Canadian patents on the modern 
"Renown" steel range, manufactured in 
that city by the Independent Stove 
Company. The range will be made by 
the Guelph company under the name of 
the Great Idea steel range. As the In- 
dependent Stove Company is composed 
of men of Canadian birth they have ar- 
ranged with the Guelph works to han- 
dle the Canadian output on all further 
patents that may be taken out. Walter 
R. Faulkner, who for some time repre 
sente'd the Independent Stove Co., has 
been secured by the Guelph Stove Com 
pany to represent them in Eastern On- 
tatio. As Mr. Faulkner is perfectly con 
versant with this range he will be of 
great assistance in helping the Guelph 
company to make this stove a popular 
seller on the Canadian market. 

DEMAND FOR ENAMELED WARE. 

An Englishman in China says that the 
people of even the remote districts are 
becoming purchasers of foreign cutlery, 
electroplated ware, and enameled ware. 
He adds: "Where one used to see a 
china ware basin or wooden tub among 
the odds and ends of a Chinese travel- 
er's baggage on board ship or on land, 
the enameled is now prominent, and. 
being unbreakable, it has come to staj 
and to oust the more fragile art icle 
There should be one in everj household 
in China, and even far away Tibet is 
importing them across the Indian fion 
tier. The same remarks' apply to glass 
or glassware. Lamps, and hardware. 
There is an ever increasing desire to pos- 
sess such goods." 

The rebuilding of Manchuria is being 
carried on so vigorously in repair of the 
damages of the great war, that the de 
mand for metals and metal goods is 
enormous, due both to the war and to 
the evolution among the natives in 
favor of European instruments of labor. 
The use of galvanized corrugated iron 
is also very extensive, mainly for root 
ing and warehouse purpi ses. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



AMONGST THE SALESMEN 



TRAVELERS' BENEFIT. 
S. R. Wickett, the new president ol 

the Commercial Travelers' .Mutual Bene- 
1,1 Society, has probablj had a loi 
experience on the Board ol that Lnstitu 
tion than any other member, having giv- 





Retiring President Joseph Taylor. 

en liis services to this society for up- 
w n''s of twentj years. He was vice- 
president in 1898, and again in 1903, and 
president in 1904. His great business 
he is a Methodist. He is a member of 
the S.O.E., and Masonic Orders. Af- 
abilitj has always been a great help to 
the society. A native of Devonshire, 
England. He came to Canada in 1855. 
After a common and High School educa- 
tion, he entered upon the business of 
leather manufacturing. Corning to To- 
ronto in 1881 he erected a building upon 
t ii' present location of the extensive 
factory of Wickett & Craig, of which he 
was the founder. Mr. Wickett is also a 
director on several fire and life insur- 
ance boards. In politics Mr. Wickett is 
a National Policy advocate, in religion 
fable and courteous, Mr. Wickett is one 
of the besWiked men in the Travelers' 
Mutual Benefit and in a much wider 
eiicle of friends. 

Joseph Taylor, the retiring piesidcnt, 
has served on the Hoard as Tins lee, 
\ ice-President and President in all About 
nineteen years, and much of the success 
ol' the society is due to his untiring 
foi i in its 'heh. ill. He was for ifteen 
- one of the most active and nvoin- 
inent directors of the Commercial Tra- 
velers' Association. He was born in the 
village of Husthwaite, Yorkshire. On 
coming to Canada he traveled for Kil- 
gour Bros, for twenty-six years, leav- 
ing that firm to return to England, 
where he spent two years. Kcturning 
to this country he engaged with the 
Canada Paper Co., with whom he has 
been for the past four year-. The world 



has uealt kindh with him in evei \ way, 

and it is to be hoped In- maj vet have 
manj years of activity and usefulness. 



PRACTICAL TALK BY SALESMAN. 

(leo. West, Toronto, who is the newly 

elected first \ ice president of t le 1 < !an 
adian Commercial Travelers' Associa- 
tion, is senior member of West. Taylor. 
Bickle & Co., manufacturers of brooms, 

brushes, w lenware, basket-, etc., 

Norwich, Out. In conversation with 

Hardware and .Metal last week he said: 

"I have had the pleasure of calling on 
the grocers and hardwaremen of On- 
tario tor some twenty-five years and 
close observation of the methods of the 
different men in their lines of business, 
leads to the conclusion that the man 
who looks closely alter the details (and 




President S. R. Wickett. 

there are many) is the successful man. 
This applies equally to office and stock. 

"As an instance of this : Mr. M 

went into business in 1K70 and sold out 
in 1890, taking enough out of the busi- 
ness to live easily for the balance of his 
life, but being a comparatively young 
man, was not satisfied to lead an idle 
life and went into manufacturing, which 
proved a failure and he lost what he 
had made in his first venture, but no- 
thing daunted he procured a stock of 
hardware and started again in an en- 
tirely new district, applying his old 
methods of looking strictly after the 
details; and. keeping everything in stock 
that would likely be called for, from a 
needle to an anchor, he soon recovered 
lost ground. The saying goes that if 
you cannot get an article at any other 

place in town, go to Mr. M , he is 

sure to have it. This opens a new ac- 
count for him. The customer reasons 
that if he has the article that is not 

27 



called for every day he is sure to have 
the one thai 
"Then othing that hurts a buei 

ness SO much a- being continually out 
of some line of goods. There are times 
when it is unavoidable, but this should 

he I ii ind not t 111: i i 



BREAKING IN NEW SALESMEN. 
For breaking in new Balesmen a I'm 
cinnati wholesale house recently origi- 
nated a method thai has since been 

adopted with ureal success by other 
houses. When a young man is sent out 
<m the load he is allowed to pursue his 
Waj lor about a week, when he i 

called by a laconic telegram: "Come 
back at once." When he reports he 
is taken into the general manager's pri- 
vate office, and there he is immediately 
taken to task, the general manager 
opening on him w it li a volley of - 
lions that would make the ordinary man 
boil over with anger. The salesman is 

given a chance lo recover his breath and 

stait to explain why he has nol done 
better, when he is interrupted with an- 
other volley <>r questions of a nature 
to arouse his ire. 

If the young man loses his temper he 
is at once discharged, hut it he takes 
il calmly without trying to gel hack al 
the "boss" and without stineinc sar- 




GEO. WEST, TORONTO 
Commercial Travelers' Vice-President. 

casm or show of temper, he is informed 

that they have been trying him out to 

see how he would deal with an irritable 
Customer, and he finishes out his trip 
and becomes a "remilar" on the sales- 
man force. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware '-Metal 

Established - '888 

Th MacLean Publishing Co. 



Limited 



JOH\ HAYXE MACLEAS 



President 



Publishers ol li.uic Newspapers which circulate m 
the Provinces ot Britiah Columbia, Alberta, Saakat- 
chewan, Manitoba. Ontario, Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick. P.E. Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal, 

Toronto. 

Win.iifbo. 

London. Eng. 

Chicago, 111. 



OFFICES : 

23)1 McGiU Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 

511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 372t> 

88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

I. Meredith Ml Kim 

Telephone, Central 129ri0 

branches: 

1001 Teutonic Bldg. 
J. Koland Kay 
St John. N.B. ... No. 7 Market Whan 
Vancouver. B.C. - - - C-eo. S. B. Perry 

Paris. France - Agence Havas, 8 Place dela Bourse 
Manchester, Eno. 92 Market Street 

Zi'rich, Switzerland - - - Louis Woll 

Orell Fussli & Co. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain, 8s. tid., elsewhere - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

r- li a jj f Adscript, London 

Cable Address | Ad8cri £ t , Canada 



RETAIL METHODS BEST. 

"Give us the retail dealers."' says 
Warden Piatt, of Kingston Peniten- 
tial. v. after five years' experience of 
selling binder twine direct to the 
tanners who are the consumers. The 
statemenl should be recorded, as ii 
proves a strong argument in favor of 
manufacturers doing business through 
regular trade channels rather than sell- 
ing to consumers direct. Here is War- 
den Piatt's statement in full'. 

"We started in last year with .{•"><> tons 
and only sold about 200 tons — less than 
half our possible output. Our twine 
as good as any ou tbe market. Our 
price was two cent- below other twine 
of the same grade. But our terms shut 
OS out. and our terms will always shut 
us out. Farmers will not send cash for 
any article they cannot see. and many 
of them cannot send cash because they 
have nol got it. To get up clubs costs 
money and increases the juice of the 
twine. Competitors take advantage of 
our terms and misrepresent the quality 

of our twine. Altogether the outlook 

is discouraging. We should he able to 
run the mill all the year. Give us tbe 
retail dealers — give us the market on 
equal terms with our competitors— and 

we will sell all the twine we can make 
if we run our factory night and day 
every month of the year. If we can- 



not have (he market, why run the fac 
lory .' All tin- 1 saj after Ave years' 
experience with the present system." 

This paper is not an advocate of pri 
son labor particularly if the govern 
ment uses the advantage thej p, >>-.," 

ill ihe way of cheap [abbr I" encourage 

price culling by selling twine at two 
cents per pound less than other manu- 
facturers can market the article at. We 
reproduce the .statement merelv for lllC 

purpose "i drawing attention to the 
endorsation given the accepted methods 
of reaching the consumer through the 

retail trade. 

On the surface it would appear that 
it would be cheaper lor manufacturers 

to sell direct to consumers- that the 
middleman's profit would be saved if 

lit was done away with. The above, 
however, is a practical example show- 
that such is not the case — that, in real- 
ity, it costs more to go to the consumer 
and, in fact, practically presents an in- 
surmountable barrier to trade to at- 
tempt to do so when sidling goods In 
quantities. 

When business is done through the re- 
tailer the farmer deals with a man he 
knows and he has a guarantee he val- 
ues. The retailer knows the tanner and 
can wait till harvest is over for his 
money if necessity requires. The re- 
tailer buys in large quantities and gets 
lower freight rales by so doing. He. 
in fact, gets up a fanners' club, takes 
all the risk, buys in large quantities 
knows what he is buying and the men 
from whom he buys, and then turns 
over the goods in small quantities, de- 
livering at such times and places as are 
convenient to the different customers. 

In return for this the retailer gets a 
sn all percentage of profit, a percentage 
which would otherwise go towards pay- 
ing higher freight rates, a bookkeeper's 
wages for keeping track of the numer- 
ous accounts of a business done by mak- 
ink small shipments to consumers. The 
retailer earns his profit both by his 
labor and by the use of his credit in 
acting as the purchasing agenl for the 
consumers. And. as shown in Warden 
Piatt's statement, the local dealer can 
sell even cheaper than the manufac- 
turer who tries to do a direct trade. 

The many seizures of fraudulent binder 
twine during the past year present an- 
other argument why the farmers should 
do business with the local dealers who 
stand behind the Roods they sell. If 
twine is not up to the standard it would 
be far easier to get satisfaction from a 
business man in the farmer's own local- 
ity than from some manufacturer or 
2s 



agent whose place of business s i loan 
distance away. 



FOR BETTER FREIGHT HANDLING 

Shipping interests in Montreal are 
taking steps to see what can be done to 
form a terminal company to handle 
freight on the wharves. The conges- 
tion at the railway terminals in Mont 
real has come to such a pass that ship 
ping men are preparing now to save 
themselves the possibility of any loss 
next season. It is believed that were a 
companj formed to handle all freight 
there would be no congestion or trouble 
of any description, 'flic idea at present 
is to form a company which to all prac- 
tical intents and purposes would be the 
Harbor Board. This terminal company 
would receive the freight arriving in 
Montreal by the different railways, and 
charging the railways a sufficient sum 
to cover operating expenses, would de- 
liver the freight to its destination. Any 
surplus which might be left at the end 
of the year would be refunded to the 
railway companies in amounts varying 
according to the business thev had given 
the company during the year. This ar- 
rangement, it is thought, would be em- 
inently fair to all concerned, and would 
ensure the wharves hems' kept reason- 
ably clear of freight at all times. 



FREE SCHOOL BOOKS. 

The Ontario Government is thinking 
of adding to the cost of public school 
education by supplying text books free 
throughout the province. The socialis- 
tic idea is spreading pretty fast just at 
the moment. It may at first blush look 
reasonable that if education is to be 
free the necessary books should also be 
free; but it is largely a question of cost 
and if the cost indirectly is going to be 
greater than at present, Where's the 
gain ? 

The retail booksellers waited on the 
Minister of Education at Toronto the 
other dav and protested against the tak- 
ing away of one of their sources of 
revenue. Thev put forward the cogent 
reason that the cost of Government dis- 
tribution would not be less than the 
present retail profits on school books. 
There are many considerations in this 
question of cost. For instance, what is 
the life of a school book ? In Toronto 
where the Board of Education provides 
free text books an extensive repair de- 
partment is maintained, which greatly 
prolongs the usefulness of the average 
book. In rural districts this would be 
impossible without doubling the cost 
of transportation by having books sent 
to a central depot for repair. 

Most, general merchants arc direct 1\ 
interested in this question and should 
express their views to their representa- 
tive in the Legislature. 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



KEEP UP THE FIGHT. 
A leading Hamilton retailer writes 
that his local Ml' lias advised liini that 
"it is not likely that a hill will he in- 
troduced in Parliament to amend tin' 
parcels post system, as the Post mast ei 
General has the power to adopt the pro- 
posed c.o. d. amendment without intro 
ducing a hill in the house." 

This emphasizes the necessity of adopt- 
ing the suggestion that the retail inn 
chants of Canada fairly bombard the 
Postmaster-General with letters of pro- 
test against the proposal. Me should 
In' made to understand that, by putting 
into effect the proposed legislation he is 
Sting a handful of wealthy mail or- 
der merchants at the expense of thous- 
ands of retail dealers throughout Can- 
ada. (Jet after the Postmaster- -General 
anil camp on his trail until the proposal 
is withdrawn. 

Similar legislation was recently pro- 
posed in England, hut the retail mer- 
chants adopted the suggestion of the 
trade press and on a certain day fairly 
flooded the Postmaster-General's office 
with protests. They kept up the tight 
and had the satisfaction of seeing the 
legislation killed. The same tactics have 
been used successfully in the United 
States in combatting the ever-greedy 
mail order merchants and they can win 
in Canada if the light is kept up. 

To come nearer home for an illustra- 
tion. A year ago Postmaster-General 
Aylesworth denied the use of the mails 
to the "Appeal to Reason," a socialist 
weekly published in Kansas. Canadian 
socialists sent thousands of letters to 
Ottawa, and the article by Eugene V. 
Debs which had caused the suspension 
of the paper was reprinted in Canadian 
papers as well as in circular form. They 
kept at it till they gained their point 
and won a victory for the freedom of 
the press in Canada. 

While it must be admitted that the 
Postmaster General has almost auto- 
matic powers and is to-day acting as a 
press censor dictating what Canadians 
can or cannot read, it is doubtful if he 
will go so far as to attack the thous- 
ands of retail merchants and deprive 
them of the means whereby they earn 
their livelihood without first securing 
the consent of Parliament. His an- 

a icement in Parliament on Dec. 7 

Last, in which he promised to fully in- 
form the House when his plans were 
completed, indicates that he recognizes 
the rights of the people's representa- 
es in the matter. If he disregards 
Parliament on this point it is a mat- 
ter between the members of Parliament 
and the retail merchants whose inter- 
file former are supposed to con- 
serve 

The moral is plain. The Postmaster 
General is the one to whom protests 



should be sent . And it won t d 

wait tin the legislat ion to be mi i oduced 

n I ai liament as ha I" 6D Uggi ' ed bj 

the Retail Merchants' Association. Pro 

test to t be Posl master ( ieneial at 0HC6 
ill some such letter a- is suggested in the 

Hardware Association page in this isx t 
Also send a petition signed b] everj 

retailer in each town to the local MP., 
asking him to see the Pest master Gen 
eral and urge the withdrawal of the 

ted amendment. And, still fui 
ther. ask the editor of the local paper 
tn point nut the dangers of centralizing 
all wealth, educational advantages, etc , 

in the big cities and have him send 
marked copies of his paper to Ottawa. 
Farmers who own property in town oj 
country, the value of which is likely to 
ie depreciated by the closing of stores, 
should also be asked to send in their 
protests. 

There is plenty of scope for action. 
Much depends upon the life put into the 
protest. So far as possible this paper 
will help to keep the trade posted as to 
the progress of the agitation. But it 
rests with each individual retailer to do 
his Dart along the lines suggested. 

Cutlery, silverware, tools, enamel- 
ware, sporting: goods, paints, wall 
paper, stoves, wire netting, and numer- 
ous other hardware lines are already 
being- sold in large quantities by the 
mail order houses. The Postmaster 
General suggests legislation to further 
extend this trade. Shall it be allowed 
to go through without protest ' 



CALENDAR, ADVERTISING. 

There are few branches of business in 
which more money is wasted than in the 
publication and distribution of calen- 
dars and it must be a source of gratifi- 
cation to many to note signs of a decline 
in the volume of this form of questionable 
advertising. Much fewer calendars were 
received at this office for review this 
year than for several seasons back, 
those received, however, showing a 
marked improvement on previous years. 
Tf a business concern favors the use of 
calendars they should get out something 
worth while and exercise great care in 
seeing that the distribution is thorough 
and covers only the field of possible 
customers. If a calendar is not strong 
enough to command a position of prom- 
inence sufficient to guarantee that it 
will bring the firm's goods before buy- 
ers for 365 days in the year, the ex 
pense should be saved. 

Both manufacturers and retailers are 
using calendars more gingerly, the 
former taking up paper knives, desk 
decorations, and other forms of business 
reminders, while many retailers have 
adapted the pocket-knife souvenir as a 
more lasting and better business bring- 

29 



ing advert • toe ' hit ai io ret aildi 

purcha ed about luu t wo bladed kn 

ear and 1 dial ribut ing 

i hem ha - a pej manent ad zerti sement in 

the poekets of a hundred ol his best 

The t ; tbont $(j 

per dozen, and his advertising mattei 

inserted under the handle on each 

side The dealer referred to has found 

the knife souvenir a paying one and 
could not be induced to take up caleu 

dars again under anj i onsidei at ion. 
Another dealer in Ontario gol satis 
■ out oi calendai I i bj 

advertising in the heal paper that he 
would have a nice calendai foi d 
bution, but only one would en to 

each household. To secure a calendar a 
person had to come to the store before 
I in- 1 and make a purcha oodf 

All names were then written in a calen 
dar book and about Dee. 1 ."> another an- 
nouncement was made in the local paper 
that the calendar was ready for di 
bution and all who had put their name- 
down before Dec. 1 could get their cal 
endar by calling for it at the stop |, 
this plan the retailer succeeded in 
getting each customer into his store 
twice before the Christmas holidays, lie 
also succeeded in compiling a first-class 
mailing list in addition to getting his 
calendar advertisement into the homes 
of those he desired as permanent cus- 
tomers. By adopting some such plan as 
this, expensive calendar advertising can 
be made to bring good results, but un- 
less similar care is exercised it is tai 
better for the retail dealer to confine 
his advertising to his local newspa 
changing it often and making a study 
of how to use the space paid for to tie- 
best advantage. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 
During the past year excellent 
gress has been made in the erection of 
the great railroad and highway canti- 
lever bridge across the St. Lawrence 
River, near Quebec. Although this 
structure is by no means the largest 
bridge in respect of its over-all length, 
it will contain the largest single span 
ever erected, the main span over the 
river measuring 1,800 feet between the 
towers. The total length from centre 
to centre of anchorage piers is 2,800 
feet, made up of two 500-foot anchor 
spans, and two o62Hoot eantil 
arms, extending over the river and car- 
rying between them a central suspended 
span of <i7.~> feet. The depth of the 
ses over the main piei feet. 

The floor system will accommodate two 
steam railroad tracks, two electric car 
tracks, two highways for vehicles, and 
two sidewalks. The bridge is now more 
than one-half erected, and will be com- 
pleted during the present year. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware Trade Gossip 



Ontario. 

ID (' Taylor, Lucknow, formerly A 
hardware merchant, has gone into the 

lumber business. 

1. P. Foucar, hardware merchant, 
Tottenham, has installed a long distance 
it lephone in liis store. 

.). D. Murdock and Co., hardware mer- 
chants, ol Simcoe, Ont., have advertised 
theii business for sale. 

G A Hums, hardware merchant, of 
Newmarket, called on the hardware job- 
bers in Toronto tins week. 

C. Bcirl, hardware merchant, of Mark- 
ham, was a visitor in Toronto this 
week, among the hardware jobbers. 

Win. Knight, hardware merchant, of 
Maple, was in Toronto this week, call- 
ing on the wholesale hardware trade. 

The hardware store of J. E. Mosley, 
Huntsville, was parti] destroyed by tire 
lasl Saturday. Loss covered by insur- 
ance. 

Geo. A. Beamish, foreman in the 
plumbing department of W. Doig, hard- 
ware merchant, of Russell, Man., has 
been a visitor in Toronto for the past 
week. 

A. II. Gingerich, hardware merchant, 
of Woodstock, will move into the new 
store which he has leased, in about two 
weeks. 

James Young has purchased the 

Stew ait hardware business at Auburn, 
and will be given possession in a day 
or two. 

.John S. Moir, hardware merchant, 
Arnprior, is having his hardware store 
enlarged, intending to make it double 
its present size. 

T. A. Kennedy, of the firm of Ken- 
nedv Bros., hardware merchants, Win 
nipeg, is spending a few days with his 
parents at Westport, Out. 

The F. Hamilton Company, hardware 
merchants ^ of Hamilton, have changed 
their name and will hereafter be known 
as the Alexander Hardware Co. 

(;. It. Duncan, of the Canadian Iron 
and Foundry Company, Kurt William, 
returned last week from Montreal, 
where he spent the Christmas vacation. 

Fred Baker, customs house representa- 
tive for Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto, 
has been ill for the past week, and Jack 
Mills, of the sample floor, is taking his 
place. 

Mr. Johnstone, of Johnstone Bros., 
hardware merchants, in the new town 
of Pefferlaw, on the C.N.R., was in To- 
ronto this week placing sorting orders 
with hardware jobbers. 

T. M. Hodgson, Toronto representa- 
tive of the Dominion Wire Company, 
was elected to the council of Fast To- 
ronto last week, heading the poll for- 
ward 1, in which he ran. 

Andrew Corbin, who for a long time 
was first vice-president of C. & F. 
Corbin, manufacturers, at New Britain, 
Conn., died at that place on Friday, 
• J,. nuary 4, in his seventy-fourth year. 

Chesney & Smiley, Seaforth, have dis- 
solved partnership as hardware mer- 



chants and their business will be con- 
tinued In Chcsncy A Wilson. Air. Sim- 
ley has purchased the slock and trade 
Of \\. H. Kumball, A\ liner, Ont. 

J. T. Carlind, who has been pushing 
Lunkenheimer valves, etc., in Ontario lor 
iomi weeks lor Chili Bros., Toronto, 
will have an exhibition at tne conven- 
tion oi the Canadian Stationary Fngi- 
aeers' Association in Ottawa next, week. 

Geo. J. B. Ramsden, travelling sales 

manager of the J. 11. Mill Manufactur- 
ing Company, St. Thorn. is, has been ap 
pointed advertising' manager, in addi- 
tion to his other duties with that com- 
pany. 

Thomas Chamberlain, foreman of one 
of the departments of Buck Stove 
Works, Brantford, was presented with 

an address and a beautiful silver but- 
ter dish by the men of his department 
during the holiday week. 

Thomas Thomson, aged 7<S years, a 
highly esteemed resident of London, 
died Jan. 5 at the family residence. De- 
ceased, who was born in Hudson, Que., 
went to London about fifty-three years 
ago ami engaged in the hardware busi- 
ness. 

Two new hardware stores are being 
started in Toronto. T. A. Whetstone, 
on College street, and Mr. Franklin, on 
Bathurst. In one case the order is be- 
ing held over awaiting the arrival of 
shelf boxes, which are becoming a recog- 
nized part of a hardware's store equip- 
ment. 

The 'management of the Natrona-] 
Portland Cement Company, of Durham, 
entertained the employes and their 
friends, some .'SOU in number, to a ban- 
quet during the holiday week. The 
company produced 45,U00 more barrels 
i i cement than last year. President 
McWilliams was presented by the em- 
ployes with a diamond ring, as a small 
token of respect. 

Quebec. 

1'. Filion, Si. Therese, was in Mon- 
treal last week. 

Felix Cyr, St. Hernias Station, was 
in Montreal last week on business. 

11. C. Eadie, iron and steel merchant, 
Montreal, is in New York on business. 

A. Limoges, Beauharnois, was in 
Montreal last week buying general 
goods. 

Andrew Forma n, of John Forman 
& Co., electrical supplies, Montreal, is 
in Xew York on business. 

J. A. Ffaser, of Prothingham & 

Workman, Montreal, has joined the 
traveling stall of the same firm. 

The assets of T. L. Clarke & Com- 
pany, manufacturers of sleigh bells, 
Montreal, are advertised for sale. 

J. S. McLcrnon, manager of John 
80 



Round i\ Son, Montreal, has gone %o 
the Old Country on a business trip. 

Mr. Budson, of the Russell & Brwin 
Manufacturing Co.. New BVitaiiit, 
Conn., is in Montreal calling on his 

customers among the wholesalers. 

Win. I'aul, Sorel, who is rebuilding 
Ihe K. & O. steamer, Sovereign, winch 
was destroyed lasl year by tire at 

Lachine, is in Montreal purchasing 
supplies. 

A. .1. Owen, Canadian representative 
of Franklin Saunders «.V Co., Montreal, 
who has been combining' business with 
pleasure in Hie Old Country, sailed 
lor home on Jan. 16. 

J. I! Campbell, ol' the Acme Can Co., 
Montreal, has returned to his desk, af- 
ter a business tiip through Western 
Canada. Mr. Campbell reports "every- 
thing lovely" in his line. 

R. F. Warren, a young man who has 
been fox the pasl 7 or S years in Frotli- 
ingliam iy. Workman's Montreal ware- 
house, has been promoted to the 
traveling staff and is now calling on 
the trade. 

1). P>. Knight, manager of the Frost 
& Wood Co., Montreal, is severing 

his connection with thai firm, and lasl 
week was presented with a gold watch 
by (he office and sales department of 
that firm. 

W. (!. How. Montreal representative 
ol' the Wilkinson Sword Co., London. 
England, has been called to (he Old 
Country suddenly owing to the death 

of his mother. Hi' is expected back 
about Feb. 15. 

A. A. Bit tues, manager of the Mon- 
treal branch of the Safety Razor Co., 
has returned JYom Boston, where he 
has been on business in connection 
with the recent fire which destroyed 
their Canadian factory. 

Western Canada. 

R. J. Mc Connell, formerly of St. 
Marys, Ont., but now a prominent hard- 
ware merchant of Carman, Man., has 
erected a line new two-storey brick 
store, 30 feet by 80 feet, into which he 
recently moved. The store is fitted with 
all the latTst improved conveniences. 

The employes of the J. 11. Ashdown 
Hardware Company, of Winnipeg, held 
a large banquet on New Year's eve. 
The affair was in honor of Messrs. 
Britton, Sinclair and Thompson, retir- 
ing members of the Ashdown staff. G. 
A. Britton, so long connected witlr the 
sporting department of the Ashdown 
Co., is going into business for himself. 
C. Sinclair, after a period of nine years' 
.service, is taking a responsible position 
with the Winnipeg Paint and Glass 
Co., ami F. Thompson has accepted a 
position with Crane & Ordway. After 
the menu was served, a presentation 
was made by W. J. Thorneloe, to each 
of the •retiring' nv. nbers'. To Mr. 
Britton a handsome meerschaum pipe, 
silver mounted, to Mr. Sinclair, a pair 
of solid gold cuff links, beautifully en- 
graved, and to Mr. Thompson a gold 
mounted fountain pen. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Markets and Market Notes 

(For detailed prices see Ourront Market Quotations, paao 62.) 



THE WEEKS MARKETS IN BRIEF. 

MONTREAL. 

Copper Range Boilers— New list shows ad- 
vances. 
Wire Nails— Advanced ten cents per keg. 
Building Paper— Advance expected daily. 
Old Material— Advanced. 

TORONTO. 
Oopper Range Boilers— New list. 
Galvanized Range Boilers— Up 25 cents. 
Oast Iron Fittings— Advanced. 
Iron Pipe— Changes in large sizes. 
J.M.T. Valves— Advanced 5 per cent. 
Brass— Higher prices quoted. 
Old Materials— Many changes upward. 
Stanley Coods— Advanced. 
Nails— Advanced 5 cents base price. 
8tarrett's Tools— Advanced. 



Montreal Hardware Markets 

Office of Hardware and Mktai., 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, Jan. If. 1907. 

Jobbers report that all travelers are 
now out and orders are coming in free- 
ly. 

The market remains very firm, with 
only one advance— wire nails, which have 
jumped up 10 cents per keg. 

Some sizes of screws are beginning to 
get scarce. 

The new building paper prices men- 
tioned last week have not yet come to 
light, but are expected any moment now. 

AXES -We quote : $7.60 to $9.50 
per dozen ; double bitt axes, $9.50 to $12 
a dozen ; handled axes, $7.50 to $9.50 ; 
Canadian pattern axes, $7.50 a dozen, 
follows: No. 3, $1.25; No. 2, $1.50; 
No. 11, $1.90 a dozen; adze handles, 34- 
inch. $2.20 a dozen; pick handles, No. 
2, $1.70; No. 3, $1.50 a dozen. 

LANTERNS. — Our prices are: 
"Prism" globes, $1.20 ; Cold blast, 
$6.50; No. 0, Safety, $4.00. 

COW TIES AND STALL FIXTURES 
—We still quote; Cow ties, dis- 
count 40 per cent, off list; stall 
fixtures, discount 35 per cent, off list. 

SLEIGH BELLS— Our prices still 
remain as follows: Back straps, 
30c. to $2.50 ; body straps, 70c 
to $3.50; York Eve bells, com- 
mon, 70c. to $1.50; pear shape, 
$1.15 to $2 ; shaft gongs, 20c. to 
$2.50; Grelots, 35c. to $2; team bells, 
$1.80 to $5.50; saddle gongs, $1.10 to 
$2.60. 

RIVETS & BIRRS— We still quote 
Best iron rivets, section carriage, and 
wagon box black rivets, tinned do. .cop- 
per rivets and tin swede rivets, 60, 
10 and 10 per cent.; swede iron burrs 
arc quoted at 60 and 10 and 10 per cent, 
off new lists ; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 25 per cent, 
off, and coppered iron rivets and burrs 



in 5-lb. carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 
10 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 15 pet 
cent., subject to usual charge for half 
pound boxes. 

l\.\\ Wllilv 1'iicrs remain linn. Our 

i tations are: No. L3, $2.55; No. L4,$2.- 

65: No. 15, $2.80; C.o.b. Montreal. 

MACHINK SCREWS— Some sizes are 
getting scarce. We quote: Kl.it head, iron, 
35 per cent., Hat head brass, 35 per cent., 
Pelisterhead, iron, 30 per cent.. Felister- 
head, brass, 25 per cent. 

BOLTS AND NUTS — Discounts 
remain,: Carriage bolts, 3 and under, 
GO and 10; 7-1C and larger, 55 p.c; fancy 
carriage bolts, 50 p.c. ; sleigh shoe 
bolts, J and under, 60 per cent.; 7-16 
and over, 50 per cent.; machine bolts, f 
and under, 60 per cent.; 7-16 and larg- 
er, 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS— New lists have been 
issued showing several changes, but dis- 
counts continue as follows : C brand, 40, 
10 and 7 per cent.; M.R.M. Co., 55 per 
cent. 

WIRE NAILS— Advance 10 cents per 
''eg. We quote : $2.40 per keg base fob. 
Montreal. 

CUT NAILS — We continue to quote: 
352.50 per 100 lbs.; M.R.M. Co., latest, 
$2.30 per keg base, f.o.b. Montreal. 

HORSESHOES. — Our prices are: 
P.R. new pattern, base price, im- 
proved pattern iron shoes, light and 
medium pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.65 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90: 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.15. Light steel 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.25; featherweight, all sizes, 
No. to 4, $5.60. Toeweight, all 
sizes, No. 1 to 4, $6.85. Packing, up 
to three sizes in a keg, 10c. per 100 lbs. 
More than three sizes, 25c. per 100 lbs 
extra. 

BUILDING PAPER— New lists have 
not yet arrived, but are expected daily. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK— No 
change in prices. We are still quoting: 
"Lehigh" Portland in wood, $2.54, in 
cotton sacks, $2.39; in paper sacks, 
$2.31. Lefarge (non-staining) in wood, 
$3.40; Belgium, $1.60 to $1.90 per bar- 
rel; ex-store, American, $2 to $2.10 ex- 
cars; Canadian Portland. $2 to $2.05. 
Firebrick, English and Scotch, $17 to 
$21, American $30 to $35; White Bros.' 
English cement. $1.80 in ba^s, $2.05 in 
barrels in round lots. 

COIL CHAIN— Our quotations re- 
main : 5-16 inch, $4.40 ; 3-8 inch, 
$3.90; 7-16 inch. $3.70.; 1-2 inch, $3.50; 
9-16 inch. $3.45; 5-8 inch. $3.35; 3 1 
inch, $3.20; 7-8 inch, $3.10; 1 inch. 
$3.10. 

SHOT — Our prices remain as follows : 
Shot packed in 25-lb. bags, ordinary drop 
AAA to dust, $7 per 100 lbs.; chilled, 
No. 1-10, $7.50 per 100 lbs.; brick 
and seal, $8 per 100 lbs.; ball, 

31 



$8.50 per 100 lbs. Net list. Bags less 
than 25 lbs., *c. per lb. extra, net ; 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, St. John, Halifax. 

AMMUNITION — Our prices are: 
Loaded with black powder, 12 and 16 
gauge, per 1,000, $15; 10 gauge, per 
1,000, $18; loaded with smokeless pow- 
der, 12 and 16 gauge, per 1,000, $20.50; 
10 gauge, $23.50. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH. We con- 
tinue to quote: In Hill foot rolls. $1.62j 
per hundred square feet, in 50 feet 
rolls, $1,674 per hundred square feet. 



Toronto Hardware Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 18, 19f7. 

Wholesale hardware merchants report 
business again very brisk, with pros- 
pects of even a brighter year than 1906. 
In some houses orders arc coming in so 
rapidly that the shipping staff have been 
working overtime. As predicted by us 
some time ago, Stanley goods have ad- 
vanced. A new schedule of prices cov- 
ering a greater part of their product has 
been issued by the Stanley Company. 
Advances are shown in numerous styles 
of rules, squares, levels and planes, hut 
the feature of the schedule is that it 
quotes net prices, and discounts have 
been virtually done away with by the 
company. Starrett's goods are also 
quoted at an advance. 

NAILS— Have again advanced 5c. per 
cwt., and are now quoted at $2.35 base 
price. The great demand still exists foi 
nails, not allowing the manufacturers to 
catch up with their orders. 

AXES AND HANDLES— A great num- 
ber of new, makes of axe handles are on 
the market, and large orders are being 
booked for Fall shipment. 

GARDEN TOOLS— These various lines 
are meeting with a good demand. .Mer- 
chants still continue placing orders. 

WASHING MACHINES, ETC. — 

Are meeting with great demand \s 

soon as stock-taking is finished mer- 
chants will order these goods sent for- 
ward. Such a number has been ordered 
this year that it will be far in excess 
of anything previous. 

SPORTING GOODS - Have again 
started moving rapidly. The Incre 
cold Weather with snow has largely in- 
creased the sale of snowshoes and 
skates. Ammunition is selling well for 
trap shooting. 

CHAIN— Remains at our former quota- 
tions : i in., $:-i.r>0 . 9-16 in.. $3.55 : \ 
in., $3.60; 7-16 in., $3.85: 3-8 in., $4.10; 
5-16 in. $4.70; 1-4 in. $5.10. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



RIVETS AND Hi RRS— Are firm at 
tlic advanced price at J."> per rent, for 
Copper, and 60, 10 and Id for iron and 
tinned 

SCREWS— The Canada Screw Co. con- 
tradict the statement thai screws an- 
on an advance. \i, other well-intoxmed 
dealf! says that the scare is all over, 
and screws will remain the same as 
formerly . 

BOLTS AND Ni TS— Scarcity is verj 
apparent with a large demand coming 
[rom all parts. 

TOOLS— Stanley goods have all ad- 
vanced and are now away ahead of all 
former quotations. Starrett's tools have 
also experienced a slight advance. 

SHOVELS— Snow-shovels are again in 
great demand and very few will be car- 
ried over the season. 

LANTERNS— The lantern demand is 
very quiet a I present, all merchants ap- 
parently having large stocks on hand. 

EXTENSION AM) STEP LADDERS 

—Price remains the same as quoted last 
week, 11 cents per foot for 3 to (i feet, 
and 12 cents per fool for 7 to 10-foot 
ladders. Waggoner extension ladders 10 
per cent. 

POULTRY NETTING— We quote : 2- 
inch mesh. 19 w.g., discount 50 and 10 
per cent. All others 50 per cent. 

WIRE FENCING— No change in the 
advanced prices of galvanized and plain 
wire, and continue selling well. 

OILED AND ANNEALED WIRE— 
(Canadian)— Gauge 10, $2.41 ; gauge 11, 
$2.17 ; gauge 12, $2.55, per 100 lbs. 

WIRE NAILS— Another advance of 5 
cents on base price of nails has been 
made and we now quote at $2.35 base. 

CUT NAILS— We quote $2.30 base 
f.o.b. Montreal ; Toronto, 20c. higher. 

IIORSENAILS— "C" brand, 40, 10 
and 7i off list. "H.R.M." brand, 60 per 
cent. off. 

HORSESHOES— Our quotations con- 
tinue as follows : P.B. base, $3.65 ; 
"M.R.M. Co., latest improved pattern" 
iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.80 ; No. 1 and. 
smaller, $4.05 ; snow, No. 2 and larger, 
S4.05 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.30 ; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4.15; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.40 ; featherweight, 
nil sizes, to 4, $5.75 ; toevveight, all 
sizes 1 to 4, $7. Packing, up to three 
sizes in a keg, 10c. per 100 lbs. extra ; 
more than three sizes in a keg, 25c. per 
100 lbs. extra. • 

BUILDING PAPER— Orders are still 
coming in briskly, the advanced price 
not affecting the ordering to any extent. 

CEMENT— We quote : For carload or- 
ders, f.o.b. Toronto, Canadian Portland, 
$1.95. For smaller orders ex warehouse, 
Canadian Portland, $2.05 upwards. 

FIREBRICK— English and Scotch fire 
brick $27 to $30 ; American low-grade, 
$23 to $25 ; high-grade, $27.50 to $35. 

HIDES, WOOL, FURS— The market 
is steady with a slight decline in coun- 
try hides to allow for lack of quality. 

Hides, in«pected, oowe and steers, No. 1 11 J 

No. 2 luj 

Country bide«, flat, nor lb., cured 01J 10 

green 031 (9 

Calf skins, No. 1, city 15! 

" " No. 1, country . 11 

Umb skins 1 15 1 25 

Horse hides, No. 1 3 50 3 75 

Rendered tallow, per lb 05} 05J 

Pulled wool*, super, per It. 25 

" " «rf»* ' 27 

Wool, unwashed fleece 15 

" washed fleece 24 25 



M Its. 

No. 1, Prime 

Rat-coon 1 50 

Mink, dark 5 00 6 00 

" Pale 2 50 35> 

Fox, red a to 3 50 

" cross 3 00 7 0j 

!•)•"* 5 0j 7 00 

Bear, black i oi) 

tubsau J yearlings 5 00 

Wolf , tnn'er 275 

praine 1X6 

Weasel, white 60 

Badger i mi 

Fisher, dark 5 00 6 00 

Skunk, black 1 26 

shirt striped 90 

" " long striped 50 

Marten 350 2u 00 

Musk rut., fall 16 

winter ,,, 20 

spr.ng u 23 

" western 12 16 



Montreal Metal Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGiU Street. 

Montreal, January 18, 1907 

No startling changes have taken place 
during the week. Ingot tin is a little 
easier, having- dropped a cent a pound. 

Copper remains unchanged and very 
linn, with no large stocks reported. 

Spelter remains unchanged, but is ex- 
pee led to go higher. 

Lead and antimony are still firm. 

New juices showing an advance in 
sheet metals are expected next week. 

Old material shows several advances. 

COPPER— Remains very firm, with 
the expected advance still a thing of 
the future. Our prices remain: Ingot 
copper. 26c to 2G^c ; sheet copper, base 
sizes. 34c. 

INGOT TIN— Shows a decline of one 
cent per pound. New prices now are 
45J to 46c per pound. 

ZINC SPELTER— Expected to go 
higher. We still quote: $7.50 to $7.75 
per 100 pounds. 

PIG LEAD. — No change over last 
week 's prices. We still quote : $5.50 to 
$5.60 per 100 pounds. 

ANTIMONY— Our price remains 27:1 
to 28 cents per pound. 

PIG IRON. — Remains the same. Our 
prices are : Londonderry, $24.50 ; Carron, 
No. 1, $24.50; Carron, special, $23.50; 
Summerlee. No. 2. selected, $25.00; 
Summerlee. No. 3, soft. $23.50. 

BOILER TUBES— Yerv Him. We 
quote: 14 to 2 in., $9.50; 2\ in., $10.35; 
24 in.. $11.50; 3 in., $13.00; 34 in, 
$17.00; 4 in. $21.50; 5 in.. $45.00. 

TOOL STEEL — Our prices re- 
main: Colonial Black Dia- 
mond, 8c to 9c; Sanderson's 
8c. to 45c, according to grade; .les- 
sop's, 13c; .lonas & Colver's, 10c to 
20c; "Air Hardening," 65c per pound; 
Conqueror, 74c; Conqueror hi^h speed 
steel, 60c; Jowitt's Diamond J., 6£c 
to 7c; Jowitt's best, lie to 114c. 

MERCHANT STEEL.— Our prices 
are as follows: Sleigh shoe, $2.25; tire, 
$2.40, spring, $2.75; toecalk, $3.05; 
machinery iron finish, $2.40; reeled 
machinery steel, $2.75; mild, $2.25 base 
atnd upwards; square harrow teeth 
$2.40; band steel. $2.45 base. Net cash 
30 days. Rivet steel quoted on appli- 
cation. 

32 



COLD ROLLED SHAFTING— 
Present prices are: 3-16 inch to 
I inch, $7.25; 5-16 inch to 11-32 inch, 
$6.20; g inch to 17-32 inch, $5.15; 9-16 
inch to 47-64 inch, $4.45; I inch to 
17-16 inch, $4.10; 1\ inch to 3 inch, 
$3.75; 3J to 3 7-16 inch, $3.92; 3i inch 
to 3 15-16 inch, $4.10; 4 inch to 4 7-16 
inch, $4.45; 4i inch to 4 15-16 inch, 
$4.80. This is equivalent to 30 per 
cent, off list. 

GALVAUIZED IRON — We are 
still quoting Queen's Eead, 

28 gauge, $1.60 to $4.85; 
26 gauge, $4.45; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.90; 
16 lt> 20 gauge, $3.75; Apollo, 28 gauge. 
$4.45 to $4.70; 26 gauge, $4.30; 22 and 
24 gauge, $3.75; 16 and 20 gauge, $3.60; 
Comet, 28 gauge, $4.45 to 

$4.70; 26 gauge, $4.30 to $4.45; 
22 and 24, gauge, $3.75 to $4.00; $16 to 
20 gauge, $3.60 to $3.85; Fleur-de-Lis, 
28 gauge, $4.45 to $4.70; 26 gauge, 
$4.30; 22 and 24 gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 
gauge, $3.60; Gorbals "Best Best." 
28 gauge, $4.45; Colborne Crown, 28 
gauge, $4.45; 26 gauge, $4.30; 24 gausje. 
$3.75. In less than ease lots, 25c ex- 
tra. 

OLD MATERIAL— We quote: Heavy 
copper, 19c per lb.; light copper, 16c 
per lb.; heavy red brass, 17 cents per 
lb.: heavy yellow brass, 14c per lb.; 
light brass, 10 to lOJc per lb.; tea lead. 
4e pier lb.; heavy lead, 4]e per lb.; scrap 
zinc. 4c per lb.; No. 1 wrought, $16.00 
to $17.00 per ton; No. 2 wrought 
$6.00 per ton; No. 1 machinery, 
$18.00 per 100 lbs.; stove plate, $13.00 
per ton; old rubber. 10 cents per lb.; 
mixed rags, 1 to l]e per lb. 

Toronto Metal Markets 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 

10 Frn«t Strpet East. 

Ternnto. inn. 18, 1907 

Things are comparatively quiet in 
metals with only a seasonable trade be- 
ing done and not many changes to re- 
port. Brass has advanced from 274 
cents to 30 cents, and this is the only 
change, with the exception of old ma- 
terial, in which we quote advances on 
old copper, brass, lead, iron and rubbers. 

There is little to say regarding pig 
iron. Prices hold very firm, but no 
changes have been made for the past 
month. Iron is still hard to get and 
prospects of relief are anything but 
bright. Pars hold the recent advance 
very well. Tin is stronger than it was 
a week ago and our price remains the 
same. 

Stocks of copper are verv low and ma- 
terial is exceedingly hard to get. The 
electrical manufacturers seem to be ab- 
sorbing a large percentage of I'm pro- 
duction and there is talk amongst Am- 
erican buyers of prices soaring higher 
than ever during 1!)07. Lead and spelter 
remain as before— firm, with a fair busi- 
ness being done. 

It is announced that the tin plate 
works at Morrisburg are" to be opened 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



Jan. 24, willi a large public dernonstra 
t ion. We w HI reporl this mal tei more 

fully in another issue. 

PIG IKON — Business is quiet, but 

prices hold very stiff. Hamilton, 
Midland and Londonderry are <>IT 
the market, and Radnor is quoted at 
$33 at furnace. Middlesl »ugh is quol 

ed at $24.50, and Siinimei lee, al $26 
Id.l)., Toronto. 

BAR IKON— Slocks are easier with 
prices linn .it $2. .'in fob Toronto, with 
'2, per cent, discount . 

INGOT TIN— The market has strength- 
ened and our quotations of 15 to Hi 

cents a pound are (lose. 

TIN PLATES— Business is active and 
prices linn with hooked orders for Spring 

and Summer delivery Large. 

SHEETS AM) PLATES— Active buy- 
Lug is reported with prices steadj . 
Stocks are light. 

BRASS— A sharp advance of 2A cents 
per pound has been made and for sheets 
we now quote ■'id cents per pound. 

COPPER— Stocks are very low owing 
bo beavj buying by electrical manufac- 
turers. Prices are very stiff. We now 
raote: Ingot copper $26 per 100 lbs., 
and sheet eopoer $31 to $32 per lot) lbs. 

LEAD— Business is fairly active and 
prices (inn. We quote: $5.40 for imported 
pirr and $5.75 to $6.00 for bar lead. 

ZINC SPELTER— Stocks continue 
light with market firm and active. We 
quote 7'.c per lb. for foreign and 7c. 
per lb. for domestic. Sheet zinc is quot- 
ed at 8 1 - If*, in casks, and 8 ]-2c. in 
part casks. 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES— We 
quote : Plates, per 100 lbs., J in. to i 
in., $2.50; £ in., $2.35 heads, per 100 
lbs., $2.75; tank plates, 3-16 in., $2.65; 
tubes, per 100 feet, li in., $8.50; 2, $9; 
2 1-2. $11.30; 3, $12.50; 3 1-2. $16; 4, 
$'20.00. Terms. 2 per cent. off. 

ANTIMONY— Market is active, and 
stocks scarce. Prices firm at 27c. to 
28c. 

OLD MATERIAL.— Dealers' buying 
prices still continue as follows: 
Ile.i\\ copper and wire, 2(1 cents per- 
il).; light copper, 17'e. per lb.; heavy 
red brass, 15c. per lb.; heavy yellow 
brass, 17Jc. per lb.; light brass, lie. 
per lb.; tea lead, $3.75 per LOO lbs.; 
heavy lead, $4.25 per 100 lbs.; scrap 
zinc, 1U\ per lb.; No. 1 wrought iron, 
SI 5; No. 2 wrought, $8; machinery cast 
scrap, $17 to $18 ; stove plate, ' $14 ; 
malleable and steel, $!i ; old rubbers, 
Hie. per pound ; country mixed rags, $1 
to $1.25 per 100 lbs., according to qual- 
ity. 

COAL— The usual difficulties in trans- 
portation are being experienced. Slack 
is still scarce. We quote : 

Standard Hocking soft coal f.o.b. at 
mines, lump $1.75, f inch, $1.65, run 
of mine, $1.40, nut, $1.25; N. & S. 
$1.10; P. & S., 85c. 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars, bond- 
ed at bridges; lump, $2.90; f inch, 
$2.<0; mine run, $2.60; slack, $2.25. 

United States Metal Markets 

From the Ifwu Ace. Jan. 17 1907. 

The buying movement in pig iron for 
forward delivery which set in in the 
Central West since the opening of the 
year, lias made further progress. It 



is estimated that during the past week 

there have been sales aggregating Hi". 

(hiii tons iii the Chicago District, in 

eluding ( block of 25,000 ton 

malleable iron i>> one foundry, and 
Ki.iiiiii tons of foundry iron to one 
machinery manufacturer Other mar- 

I el -. like Cincinnati and < 'levolniid. are 

feeling the movement, the furnaces in 

the latter district having advanced the 
pi ice to $22. 

Favorable indications are com 
from the Birmingham district with re 

gard lo the ear situation there. It is 
estimated that there are piled up at I lie 

furnaces in the district between (>»'.- 

0(10 to 70,000 Ions of pit:' iron, sold and 

long due io be delivered, which it has 
been impossible to move. 

Pipe makers report heavy inquiries 
for oasi iron pipe, among them being 
one lot of 12,000 tons for Chicago. The 
coming letting of 38,000 Ions of pipe 
for New Orleans next week, will have 
more than local significance. The con- 
tract is to be let in six sections, but 
the bulk of the pipe is for next year's 

delivery. In view of the relatively 

high prices it is considered rather 
doubtful whether the whole of the work 
will be given out. It will be signi- 
ficant if it is not. 

Pittsburg reports that the supply of 
steel is becoming' better, so far as the 
open market is concerned. On the 
other hand.! tidewater steel works have 
been able lately to place in the territory 
west oP tlie Alleghenics sonic good lots 
at high prices. 

While some large additional steel 
rail tonnage is pending the largest -in- 
gle order placed was 7,000 tons for tic 
San Antonio & Aransas Pass. It is 
estimated that all the mills in the coun- 
try have on their books orders aggre- 
gating' 2,500,000 tons in addition lo 
about 250.000 tons carried over from 
last year. 

In structural material one order call- 
ing' for 15,000 tons lias been practical- 
ly closed. Otherwise only fair sized 
work lias come out. One of the east- 
ern mills lias advanced its price for 
shapes to $1.85, at mill, against the 
usual quotations of $1.85, at tide- 
water. 

From the Iron Trade Review, Jan. 17, 1907 

One of the most interesting features 
in the whole iron and steel business 
during the week came out when the steel 
car interests began to make inquiries 
for plates extending into L906, and it is 
announced th.it inquiries in the neighbor- 
hood of 10,000 cars are now in the mar- 
ked, showing that the railroad com- 
panies have confidence in the future fm 
ptactiCally a year and a half at least. 
as deliveries on this number of car-. 
could not be made before -Inly, 1908, 
when the work on hand in this line is 
taken into consideration. 

The demand for sheets continues 
Strong. The principal producer is now 
behind on deliveries from 11 to lfi 
weeks Inability lo secure an adequate 
supply of sheet bars has prevented mills 
from "running to their full capacity The 
tremendous demand for plates continues, 
and mills are overwhelmed with specifi- 
cations, while mills are having difficulty 

38 



in obtaining supplies of semi-fmi 

Owing to the mild we.it liei and I 

ings ot i he railroad .. old material pi 

■ igging in neat ly all cent res < 'ol-.e 
condit ion i are also somewhat easiei 
much bcttct delivery is being given bv 

A decided Improvement in the demand 

tructural material i> noted, i 
dally m the Chicago districl where the 
Illinois Steel ' received specifica- 
tions imi ..b,, hi B0, tons, of which 

some an, nun tons came from a western 
( ar builder, ami Included both plates and 

shapes Numerow bis foi In idge ma 

ieii.il aggregating a considerable ton- 
have been placed, and inanv. in- 
quiries for Steel for new buildings in 
New York, Chicago and othei (Mies are 
pending. 

London, Eng., Metal Markets 

From M'tol Market Report, Jan I'. 19 7. 

Cleveland warrants are quoted at 
60s. 7 si., and Glasgow standard war- 
rants at 59s. I0d., making pri© 
compared with last week, -lid. higher 
on Cleveland warrants, and :!>. Id. 
higher mi Glasgow standard warrants. 

TIN- Spot tin opened steady at 
£189, futures at 6190 5s., and after 

sales of 360 tons of spot and ISO tons 

i f futures closed easy at £188 15s. for 
spot, £189 15s. for futures, making 
pi Hi- compared with las) week 10s. 

higher -on spot and unchanged on 

futures. 

COPPEK Spot copper opened eas\ 
al t'108 5s., fiiinres. £109, and after 

sales of 500 Ions of spot and 450 tons 

of future-, closed steady at £108 10s. 
for spot, ami £108 17s. lid. for futures, 
making price compared with last week 
€2 7s. (id. higher on spot and CI 15s. 

higher mi futures. 

LEAD— The market closed at £10 
17s. (id., making price as compared with 
last wee!;, 2s. (id. higher. 

SPELTER— The market dosed at 

£27 12s. (id., making price as compared 
with last week, 2s. 6d. lower. 

B.C. Hardware Trade News 

Vancouver, Jan. 12. I'm: 
It is positively announced that the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railway, which 
has now a line under const ruction from 
St. Paul to Seattle, will seek entry into 
Canada at Vancouver, to partake of 
the coast trade here. Representatives 
of the road have visited the city from 
lime to time in the past few months 
with the intent to seek suitable loca- 
tion for terminal facilities, though so 
far as known no purchases have been 
made vet. 

With' the advent of this road, when it 
ultimately reaches the coast, and the 
rumored intention of the Canadian 
Northern also to seek entrv to the coast 
a1 Vancouver, this city will have earned 
its title to the name "Terminal City" 
which it is now usually dubbed. The C 
P.R. and the Great Northern are both 
here, the G.T.P. is coming, and the C. 
N.R. and the Chicago & Northwestern 
will make five trunk lines which will 
ie dav run into Vancouver. 
Before R. G. Maepherson. MP. left 
for Ottawa, returning from spending 



THE MARKET* 



Hardware and Metal 



Christmas .it home, hi- was consulted by 
the Vancouver Board of Trade on vari- 
ous matters <>i importance in which this 
city is interested. Perhaos the most im- 
ude oi the Govern- 
ment isting tin project of a large 
terminal elevator built here to encour- 
the shipment of Alberta grown 
• via this eo.isi At present a 
Freight rate which is against the west 
ern shipping of wheat is in force. Hut 
it has been intimated that the C.P.R. 
would meet t he rate question amicably 
if the Government would provide ter- 
minal facilities for storage and ship- 
ment of grain similar to that already 
provided at Montreal. Mr. Macphcrson 
promised to look into the matter fully, 
and if advisable to have such facilities 
d of elevators built and operated by 
private enterprise he would support the 
ct, in order to see that the ship- 
ping of wheat this way was fostered. 

It was pointed out at the conference, 
that the C.P.R. now complained of hav- 
ing to bring empty cars west to accom- 
modate the lumber trade, as there was 
not traffic enough to the coast to bring 
out loaded cars in sufficient numbers to 
supply the coast mills with all the cars 
they needed for the lumber trade. If the 
wheat came west the car shortage would 
be in large measure remedied. 

* * * 

Another important matter brought to 
Mr. Macpherson's notice was the Hoard 
request sent to the Government for the 
rescinding of the order in council sus- 
pending the coasting laws as far as this 
coast was concerned. R. P. McLennan, 
chairman of the meeting, explained that 
when the suspension of the coasting laws 
had been asked for it was to give the 
merchants a chance to ship goods, es- 
pecially north. Now that the local 
steamer service had been very greatly 
improved, it was unnecessary to con- 
tinue the suspension, and in fact it 
would be a benefit to the lines now well- 
established locally, as it would assist 
them in building up still further. II 
would also compel other railway com- 
panies to improve their terminal facili- 
ties if the order were rescinded and the 

coasting laws enforced. 

* * * 

Large wharves arc to be built at once 
a1 Prince Rupert, the Kaien Island ter- 
minus of the Grand Trunk Pacific. A 
larL r e pile-diiver was sent north recently 
and as soon as it reached the new ter- 
minus that is to be, it would be put in 
commission driving piles for the 
wharves. Recently a small pipe line 
was installed, the beginning of the wa- 
ystem which will supply the new 
city. This supply is but temporary to 
ensure good water for the few cottages 
and places of business now erected or 
being erected on the town site. The 
United Supply <v Contracting Co., which 
has offices in Vancouver, is in charge of 
much of the improvement going forward 
at Prince Rupert. 

Mining matters in the boundary dis- 
trict have progressed very satisfactorily 
during 1906. The total shipments of ore 
for the year as far as reported, were 
1,162,034 tons. The three boundary dis- 
trict smelters, the Granhy at Grand 
Forks, the- U.C. Copper Co. at Boundary 
Kails, the Dominion Copper Co., at 
Greenwood, treated during the year 
1,180,546 tons. 

1 1, Rossland camp, much good work 

been accomplished and the output, 

especially of the old mines, Le Roi and 

Centre Star, greatly increased. The old 



Northport smelter is now in commission 

again and as soon as the balance of 30,- 

i tons still to be sent to Trail has 

been shipped from the Le Roi mine the 
: 1 he output will go to Northport . 

Two furnaces have already been blown 
in at Northport and two more will be 

blown in as soon as the management is 

sure of the coke supph . 

Regarding the coke situation, \l.i i 
G. G. S. Lindsey of the Crow's \esi 
Pass Coal Co., who is in Victoria on 
business, says (hat the strike at Fcrnie 
is all settled and the mine has resumed 
its normal activity. The output of coke 
is again up to the usual amount and no 
farther trouble is anticipated. 

* * * 

Many of the coast lumber mills are 
partially shut down for the annual clean- 
up and refitting of machinery. Lumber 
orders are, however, coming in from the 
Northwest without abatement and the 
gre.it est activity is noticeable in the 
market. Prices have not advanced yet 
since the 1 beginning of the year, but an- 
other increase is quite within the bounds 
of possibility. Since the holiday season 
has closed the loggers, minus the pro- 
ceeds of their December pay-checks, have 
gone back up coast to the camps, and 
though snow is heavy in some places, 
still it is considered that a good deal Of 
timber will now be got out. Recently 
there were nine tugs, all with large 
tows of logs, congregated at one time 
in Secret Cove, a shelter harbor some 
distance up the coast. 

* * * 

The possibilities of development of 
Vancouver's great harbor have been 
thrown on the screen with startling 
vividness bv the published announcement 
of the plans of the V.W. & Y. R'y., the 
coast branch of the Great Northern 
Railway in this province. Ordinarily 
the casual observer looks upon Van- 
couver's harbor as that little fringe of 
water-front on the south side of Burrard 
Inlet, facing the city proper, and along 
which the C.P.R. wharves cover most 
>f the space. But the oft^mooted ques- 
tion of a bridge across what is known 
as the "Second Narrows." about a mile 
and a half from the C.P.R. wharves, 
and a spur line run along the north shore 
of "the inlet for nearly five miles, is now 
being definite!'' brought down to a pro- 
ject for immediate execution. This would 
mean the "arrival," as the French would 
say, of the greatest harbor in Canada, 
the whole of Burrard Inlet, with its 
land-locked security and its great denth 
of anchorage wide enough also for the 
merchant fleets of the whole Pacific to 
swing in, beinc available for such enter- 
prises as would require dockage and wa- 
ler-front facilities combined with rail 
connection on land. 

The bridge across the Narrows has 
been looked on as the first step north- 
ward, of the V.W. & Y., which holds a 
charier extending some hundreds of miles 
north from Vancouver. But the announ- 
ced intention of the railway to place in- 
dustrial sites on the north shore of the 
inlet in the advantageous position of 
having rail connection, has made the 
project assume a distinctly new and im- 
mediate interest. It is expected that 
work will begin during the present year 
on the proposed bridge, which will be a 
high level structure to permit of ship- 
ping passing under it. 

* » » 

While coal mining on Vancouver Is- 
land has long been one of the chief in- 
dustries, famed far and wide as a grand 

N 



steaming coal, has been sold in immense 
quantities in San Francisco and to the 
many steamers trading to this coast, 
the operation of mines has been always 
confined to a limited area. The three 
chief mines arc the Nanainio. Extension, 
close to Nanaimo, and Comox, some dis- 
tance further north on the east coast of 
the island. Quite recently parties with 
capital have become interested m 
.i en, il measure of promise' .it \. moose 
Bay, close to Nanaimo also. Now it is 
reported that some six thousand acres 
of Coal lands at Sooke Hay, close to 
Victoria, have been leased and work 
with diamond drill is to commence at 
once to determine the value of the coal 
seams under the property, and if re- 
sults are as expected, there will be an- 
other big coal producing mine on the is- 
land. * • # 

Wood pulp made in H.C. will be on 
the market next year, says managing 
director J. M. Maekinnon, of the C.m.> 
dian Pacific Sulphite Pulp Co., whose 
operations at Swanson Bay on the 
northern coast have been assuming defin- 
ite shape and increasing activity for 
some months. Over 8:5,000 acres of land 
are owned bv the company, which is 
capitalized at £100.000, most of which 
is English money. Some leading British 
pulp men are directly interested. Among 
them is Mr. John Mackie, managing di- 
rector of Davidson & Son, of Aberdeen, 
one of the largest pulp-importing con- 
cerns in the old country. Geo. F. Hardv 
of New York, the best known expert in 
designing pulp plants, is consulting en- 
gineer. Tt is intended to develop wa- 
ter-power from Swanson river, which is 
capable of giving from 11,000 to SO 000 
horse-power. Many car-loads of machin- 
ery for the plant are now in Vancouver, 
and en route from the manufacturers. 



U. S. STEEL PLANT. 

The Financial Post, Toronto, refers 
to the proposal to establish a plant of 
the United Stales Steel Corporation at 
Sandwich as follows: "Daily press 
despatches from Sandwich say (hat 
work will be begun during the earlv sum- 
mer by the United States Steel Corpor- 
ation upon a mammoth steel plant em- 
ploying: 5,000 men. The property is un- 
der option and is 1,000 acres in extent, 
chiefly belonging to the Scotten estate 
of which Dr. R. Adlinton Newman is the 
administrator. This statement is at all 
events premature. The property in 
question is under option to parties who 
may or may not represent the U.S. 
SI eel Corporation Or any other com- 
pany. The option has not been exercis- 
ed as yet. Tf this somewhat prophetic, 
and prospective announcement were 
correct, it would be a matter of con- 
siderable i uteres! and moment. As a 
matter of fact the United States Steed 
Corporation has benn intending to lo- 
cate in Canada. Another point, Port 
Colborne, has been mentioned." 



AGENTS WANTED. 

A United States firm manufacturing a 
safety clevis are anxious to secure Cana- 
dian agents. This clevis has had a large 
sale in the United States among the 
hardware trade and it should be a good 
line for some manufacturer's agent in 
Canada to take up. Address enquiries 
to. "Manager," Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



COPPER vs. COAL. 

The constant!} growing demand for 
electric power is absorbing every pound 
, of available copper, as substituti 
the metal are being used in practically. 

every other line, says .1 keen observer 
of U.S. copper markets 

Sheet copper workers and cornice 
makers .'declare that they arc using only 
half the copper they would were fche 
price down to 15 cents. Galvanized iron 
is taking the place of copper in the build- 
ing trades; and the consumption of 
brass has suffered decidedly in some di- 
rections. This is how the advance in 
of copper to supply the tremendous 
price has made available a larger amount 
growth of demand from electrical manu- 
facturers, wire mills, etc. 

Copper is coming to he a direct com- 
petitor of coal. The world is using me- 
chanical power in a constantly increas- 
ing ratio. Every advance in the wages 
of the coal miners, every increase in the 
cost of mining supplies and in other 
mining expenses increases the price of 
coal and, therefore, advances the cost 
of creating power. 

On the other hand, there have been 
most decided advances in the science of 
electrical generation and transmission, 
and in many places electricity, generat- 
ed bv waterpower, is entering into com- 
petition with the isolated steampower 
plant. While opportunities exist for the 
creation of electricity by waterpower 
copper at $1 per pound is cheaper than 
coal at $7 per ton. Now that electrical 
power can be transmitted 500 miles or 
more without any appreciable loss, wa- 
terpower privileges are advancing in 
price ; and the question as to whether 
it is cheaper to generate electricity at 
the coal mines and transmit it across 
country by wire, or to ship the coal to 
local steam plants, as is done now, is 
being considered bv power economists. 

The work of equipping steam railroads 
with electricity is going abead much 
more rapidly than most people realize, 
and the prospect now is that it will 
continue as rapidly as is consistent with 
a reasonable price for copper. 



IMPORTING PIG IRON. 

The Glasffow Scotsman of recent date 
says : 

"Tn the course of the last few weeks 
the American demand for Scottish pig 
iron has reached dimensions which have 
not been experienced for years, and 
which probably not a single member of 
the trade ever expected to see realized. 
Years ago the United States were lib- 
oral buyers of Scottish brands, and thev 
have always taken more or less, latter- 
ly very much less ; but owing to their 
own enormous production the market 
has long ceased to be one on which pro- 
ducers in Scotland could reckon. Sud- 
denly, however, a chancre has come over 
the situation ; apparent indifference has 
given place to activity, manifested in a 
rush of orders from all the consuming 
centres in the Eastern States, and cov- 
ering present and prospective wants 
which sellers on this side find sreat dif- 
ficulty in meeting. Tn fact, they are 
unable to do so completely. 

"It is calculated that since the be- 
ginning of the month (November 1 to 
19) firms in Boston. Philadelphia, Balti- 
more, and New York have contracted 
with Glasgow houses for the shipment 
of between 30,000 and 40,000 tons, 



mostly for foundry qualities, but also of 
hematite. Last week quite 10,000 ton 

were put t In OUffh, and or. I nan. 

thousands ol ion . ii.r, e been declined b . 
make] 1 | theii inabilit \ to give 

delivej j l '1 ompt dispatch is desired in 

1,1 ' B and ,1 i room in the i I 

steamship lines h fclmoat whollj 

taken up, it has been found nee -i -ai - to 

oharti il steamers, a thing that 

has qoI happened in t in- memorj ol the 
present general ion of shippi 
what has been ai ranged foj on Northern 

States' aCCi nun . | of OV61 

tons has been sold for New Orlean 
first of the kind since Lffi 

"If the American demand I'm Scottish 
iton is maintained into L907 (and there 
are strong inquiries to point that 
• 1 1 ondit ion of things may bi en 
which will prove most embarrassing for 
home consumers. There arc no stocks, 
public or private, of consequence to 
back upon, and which always were a 
stand-by in the past. A year ago there 
were about !)'_!, 0>00 tons in res< 
at the opening of J.9U0 there were 277 - 
000 tons." 



CIGARS AS ADVERTISEMENT. 

J. W. Harris & Co., contractors, 
Montreal, have adopted an unique form 
of advertising. They have been send- 
ing around to the trade, cigars con- 
taining their own band, marked "J 
W. 11. & Co." 

As these cigars are good quality, it 

IS needless to say that J. \V. Harris 

& Co. are extremely popular just at 
present. 



COPPER FAMINE. 

A copper famine is impending owing 
to the enormous demand for the metal 
at home and abroad. The demand is 
due to the great growth of ' electrical 
work all over the world. Manufactur- 
ers of electrical machinery say that the 
demand for their products is unpre- 
cedented. Authorities in the copper 
trade say it. is doubtful if the output 
of copper this year will show a material 
increase oyer that of 1905. The scar- 
city of skilled miners has handicapped 
the larger producers and consequently 
has reduced production. It is also like- 
ly that the Chilian production will be 
materially reduced by the recent earth- 
quake. 

ROGERS BELT PUNCH. 

E. C. Atkins v\ Co., saw manufac- 
turers, Indianapolis, have just closed 
a deal whereby they secure the entire 
light to make and sell the Rogers Ii.lt 
Punch. This little device— for punch- 
ing holes in bell.-, straps, etc., is loo 

well known to require an Introduction. 
It is light, convenient, and does its 
work to perfection. The blade, id' 
sharpened steel, slips into the handle 
when not in use, SO that it is entirely 

protected. To operate, it is only neces 
sarv to pull out a thumb spring which 
tit> into notches in the handle. 

The blade is graduated and slightly 
concave, so that the size of the hole to 

35 



be cut may be regulated by the amount 
ol' blade Bj slight 

the blade is forced through 1 lie b.dt or 

itrap ami by turning the handle around 
once, an even hole of uniforn 
'Hi. Il sells lor fifty cents and should 
ami u ill he in the pocket of e\ei , 

having to cut uniform hoi belt- 

traps, and leather. Mfuiy oi 
best jobbers carry them, or it can be 

bought through E. c. Atkins & Co.. 77 
Adelaide Street cast, Toronto. 



BRADSTREET'S FAILURE RECORD 
idstreet 's record of failures in Can- 
ada for 2, \eais past is as follows : 

Number. Assets. Liabilities. 

J90G 1,232 $4,258,310 $9 540 915 

191)5 1,121 6,556,331 13,837,1 70 

1904 1,177 4,136,018 10,01 

1903 956 3,832,197 8,328,362 

1902 1,092 3,597,220 8,32 

1901 1,370 5,196,951 11,65 

1900 1,333 4,244,932 10,786 

1'99 1,285 4,507,608 11 M 

1?98 1,427 4,085,722 9,644 100 

1897 1,907 5,191,647 13,147 929 

1896 2,179 6,724,535 16,208,460 

1895 1,923 6,2!M), 177 15,79 

1894 1,873 11,947,253 

1893 1,781 7,388,61)2 I 

1892 1,682 4,848,095 L1.6Q 

1891 1,846 6,014,000 11,881 000 

1889 1,616 6,119,585 13.1 i. 

1888 1,730 7,178,744 15,498,242 

1887 1,315 8,407,000 17,054,000 

1886 1,186 5,566,471 11,240 

1885 1,286 4,201,831 9,210,334 

1884 1,363 9,074,000 17,12*. 1 

1883 1,464 12,367,000 22,1V 

1882 755 3,945,000 8,139,000 

1881 607 3,278,475 6,122,208 

1880 839 ' 4,700,372 !), 310,929 

The above statistics go far lo c on- 
firm the advices of large trade and good 
profits in Canada in the past year. 
There were 1,232 failures in the Domin- 
ion in 1906, a decrease of 13.4 per cent, 
from 1905, while the liabilities wen 
540,915, a decrease of 31 per cent, from 
the preceding year. 



NEW GILLETTE FACTORY. 

A. A. Bittues, manager of the Mon- 
treal factory of the Gillette Safety 
Razor Co., has returned from a trip 
to the head office in Boston, where he 
has been reporting conditions in 
nection with the fire which recently 
put their Canadian branch out of busi- 
ness. Mr. Bittues explains that the 
board have seen lit to allow him to find 
another factory in which to continue 
this end of the business within the 
shortest possible time. 

The firm is at present trying to make 
arrangements with the Ottawa Govern- 
ment to allow them to bring in razors 
in such condition that they can bo 
completed by some Canadian firm, as the 
bulk of the machinery used in their fac- 
tory was built by themselves — it can't 
be bought in the open market and takes 
4 or 5 months to make. However, 
Mr. Bittues reports that there will be 
no unnecessary delay in getting things 
going again. 

The firm, although in Montreal, 
been treated extremely well by the 
hardware trade in general, having 
many kind offers of assistance, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



There is 
Twenty Years 
of Experience 
in this Can 



MANITOBA HARDWARE AND METAL MARKETS 

I Mark.'! quotations oorreoted l>; telegraph up to 12 a.m. Friday, .Ian. 11,1907.) 

Room 511, Union I'.ank Building, Office of Hardware and Metal, Winnipeg, Man 



P 




Doesn't this point the 
way for you '? Stephen's 
Pure Paint has now a 
proven record of over 
twenty years' hard use, 
under many difficult con- 
ditions. 

Every gallon is made 
with Manitoba Linseed 
Oil — properly aged — this 
increases not only the 
body, but also the wear- 
ing qualities of the paint. 

Our extensive Adver- 
tising creates the demand 
Will you supply it in your 
territory ? 

Write for our special 
plan, tells how " We help 
you sell." 

G. F. Stephens & Co. 



PAINT AND COLOR DEALERS 



Limited 



WINNIPEG, 



CANADA 



The past week has been a comp 
livelj quiel one in the hardware and 
metal trades, but all wholesalers pre- 
dict that the next few weeks will see 
a decided improvement and they expect 
the coming Spring to show a better 
volume of trade than any previous per- 
iod. The congested condition of the 
roads owing to the recent unprecedent- 
ed heavy snow storms has doubtless had 
the effect of limiting business, but or- 
ders are coming in fairly well notwith- 
standing, though shipping will not com- 
mence to any extent for another month. 

Prices in some lines have advanced, 
notably Copper rivets, wrought butts, 
wire nails, barb wire and shovels. Lead 
also shows an advance, and prices in the 
paint and oil departments hold firm, 
with linseed oil 3 cents higher. 

LANTERNS. — Quotations are ,as 
follows: Cold blast, per dozen, $6.50; 
coppered cold blast, per dozen, $8.50; 
cold blast dash, per dozen, $8.50. 

WIRE— We quote as follows : Barbed 
wire, 100 lbs., $2.90 ; plain galvanized, 
f> to 8, $3.39 ; 10, $3.50 ; 12, $3.10 ; 13 
$3.20 ; 14, $3.90 ; 15, $4.45 ; 16, $4.60; 
plain twist, $3.15; staples, $3.25; oiled 
annealed wire, 10, $2.96 ; 11, $3.02 ; 12, 
$3.10; 13, $3.20; 14, $3.30; 15, $3.45. 
Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

HORSESHOES — Quotations are as 
follows : Iron, No. to No. 1, $4.65 ; 
\ T o. 2 and larger, $4.40 ; snowshoes, No. 
it to No. 1, $4.90 ; No. 2 and larger, 
S4.65 ; steel, No. to No. 1, $5 ; No. 2 
and larger, $4.75. 

HORSENAILS — Lists and discounts 
are quoted as follows : No. 10, 20c. ; 
No. 9, 22c. ; No. 8, 24c. ; No. 7, 26c. ; 
No. 6, 28c. ; No. 5, 32c. ; No. 4, 40c, 
per pound. Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows : "C" brand, 40, 10 and 1\ per 
cent., "M" brand and other brands, 55 
and 60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

WIRE NAILS— Quoted now at $2.80 
1 it keg. 

CUT NAILS.— As noted last week 
cut nails have been advanced to $2.90 
per keg. 

PRESSED SPIKES — Prices are 
quoted as follows since the recent ad- 
vance: -j x 5 and 6, $4.75; 5-6 
x 5, 6 and 7, $4.40; § x 6, 7 and 8, 
$4.2.",; 7-16 x 7 and 9, $4.15; i x 8, 9, 10 
and 12, $4.05; 5 x 10 and 12, $3.90. All 
other lengths 25c. extra net. 

SCREWS— Discounts are as follows : 
Hat head, iron, bright, 85 and 10 p.c. ; 
round head, iron, 80 p.c; fiat head, 
brass, 75 and 10 p.c. ; round head, brass 
70 and 10 p.c. ; coach, 70 p.c. 

NUTS AND DOLTS — Discounts are 
in hanged and continue as follows : 
Holts, carriage, f or smaller, 60 and 5 ; 
bolts, carriage, 7-16 and up, 55 ; bolts, 
machine, g and under, 55 and 5 ; bolts, 
machine, 7-16 and over, 55 ; bolts, tire, 
65 : bolt ends, 55 ; sleigh shoe bolts, 65 
and 10 ; machine screws, 70 ; plough 
bolts, 55 ; square nuts, case lots, 3 ; 
square nuts, small lots, 2J ; hex nuts, 
rase lots, 3 ; hex nuts, smaller lots, 
2$ p.c. 



RIVETS— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows since the recent advance in the 
price of copper rivets: Iron, discounts, 
ml Hi p.c; copper, No. 7, 38c; No. 
8, 3N. , ,c; copper, No. .10, IHc; copper, 
No. L3, 1 l.'.c, assorted, No. 8 and 10, 
3!Uc. and \2!a\ 

COIL CHAIN. — Prices have been re- 
vised, the general effect being an ad- 
vance. Quotations now are: \ inch 
$7.00;5 ],;. $5.35 ;%, $4.75 ; 7-16,$4.50; 
\, $4.25; 9-16, $4.20; %, $4.25; }, $4.10. 

SHOVELS— List has advanced $1 per 
dozen on all spades, shovels and scoops. 

HARVEST TOOLS — Discounts con- 
tinue as before, 60 and 5 per cent. 

AXE HANDLES— Quoted as follows : 
Turned, s.g. hickory, doz., $3.15 ; No. 1, 
$1.90 ; No. 2, $1.60 ; octagon, extra, 
$2.30 ; No. 1, $1.60. 

AXES. — Quotations are: Bench axes, 
•10; broad axes, 25 p.c. dis. off list; Roy- 
al Oak, per dozen, $6.25; Maple Leaf, 
$8.25 ; Model, $8.50 ; Black Prince, 
$7.25 ; Black Diamond, $9.25 ; Standard 
flint edge, $8.75 ; Copper King, $8.25 ; 
Columbian, $9.50 ; handled axes, North 
Star, $7.75 ; Black Prince, $9.25 ; Stan- 
dard flint edge, $10.75 ; Copper King, 
$11 per dozen. 

BUTTS— The discount on wrought iron 
butts is 65 and 5 p.c. 

CHURNS — The discounts from list 
continue as before : 45 and 5 per cent. ; 
but the list has been advanced and is 
now as follows : No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; 
No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, $11 ; No. 4, $13 ; 
No. 5, $16. 

CHISELS— Quoted at 70 p.c. off list 
prices. 

AUGER BITS— Discount on "Irwin" 
bits is 474 per cent., and on other lines 
70 per cent. 

BLOCKS— Discount on steel blocks is 
35 p.c. off list prices ; on wood, 55 p.c. 

FITTINGS— Discounts continue as fol- 
lows : Wrought couplings, 60 ; nipples, 
65 and 10 ; T's and elbows, 10 ; malle- 
able bushings, 50 ; malleable unions, 55 
p.c. 

GRINDSTONES— As noted last week, 
the price is now l£c. per lb., a decline 
of Ac 

FORK HANDLES— The discount is 40 
p.c. from list prices. 

HINGES— The discount on light "T" 
and strap hinges is 65 p.c off list 
prices. 

HOOKS— Prices are quoted as follows: 
Brush hooks, heavy, per doz., $8.75 ; 
grass hooks, $1.70. 

CLEVISES— Price is now 6£c. per lb. 

STOVE PIPES— Quotations are as 
follows : 6-inch, per 100 feet length, 
$9 ; 7-inch, $9.75. 

DRAW KNIVES— The discount is 70 
per cent, from list prices. 

RULES— Discount is 50 per cent. 

WASHERS— On small quantities the 
discount is 35 p.c. ; on full boxes it is 
40 p.c. 

WRINGERS — Prices have been ad- 
vanced $2 per dozen, and quotations are 
now as follows : Royal Canadian, 
$35.00; B.B., $39.75, per dozen. 

FILES— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows : Arcade, 75 ; Black Diamond, 60 ; 
Nicholson's, 62£ p.c 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



THE 



Winnipeg Paint «* Glass C 



o. 

Limited 



Warehouses 



CALGARY 



EDMONTON 



WINNIPEG 



Our sample books of B/VS-KA-INO— (something new in 
wall hangings — standard colors) and LIN-UNA (a high-class 
colored tapestry burlap — all colors), sized and oil-coated bur- 
laps will be out in a few days. We would like to mail you 
one of these. Send us your orders. 



i 



BUILDING PAPER — Prices ate as 
follows : Plain, Joliette, 40c. ; Cyclone, 
55c. ; Anchor, 55c. ; pure fibre, 00c ; 
tarred, Joliette, 65c. ; Cyclone, 80c ; 
Anchor, 65c. ; pure fibre, 80c. 

TINWARE, ETC. -Quoted as follows: 
Pressed, retinned, 70 and 10 ; pressed, 
plain, 75 and 2£ ; pieced, 30 ; japanned 
ware, 37J ; enamelled ware, Famous, 
50 ; Imperial, 50 and 10 ; Imperial, one 
coat, 60 ; Premier, 50 ; Colonial, 50 
and 10 ; Royal, 60 ; Victoria, 45 ; white 
45 ; Diamond, 50 ; Granite, 60 p.c. 

GALVANIZED WARE. — The dis- 
count on pail is now 37 J per cent.; 
and on other galvanized lines the dis- 
count is 30 per cent. 

CORDAGE— We quote: Rope, sisal, 7- 
16 and larger, basis, $11.25; Manila, 7-16 
and larger, basis, $16.25 ; Lathyarn, 
$11.25 ; cotton rope, per lb., 21c. 

SOLDER— Quoted at 27c. per pound. 
Block tin is quoted at 45c. per pound. 

VISES — Prices are quoted as fol- 
lows : "Peter Wright," 30 to 34, 144c; 
35 to 39, 14c; 48 and larger, 13ic per 
lb. 

ANVILS— "Peter Wright" anvils are 
selling at lie per lb. 

.CROWBARS— Quoted now at 4c. per 
lb. 

POWER HORSE CLIPPERS — The 
"1902" power horse clipper is selling 
at $12, and the "Twentieth Century" 
at $6. The "1904" sheep shearing ma- 
chines are so' 1 at $13.60. 

AMMUNITION, ETC.— Quotations are 
as follows: Cartridges, Dominion R.F. 
50 and 5 ; Dominion, C.F., 3'i.V 
C.F., pistol, p.c; C.F., mili- 

tary, 10 p.c. advance. Loaded 
shells : Dominion Eley's and Kynoch's 
soft, 12 gauge, black, $16.50; chilled, 12 
gauge, $17.50; soft, 10 gauge, $19.50; 
chilled, 10 gauge, $20.50. Shot, ordm- 
ary, per 100 lbs., $7.25; chilled, $7.(5; 
powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton, $4.75 ; 
P.F.G.. Dupont's, $5. 

IRON AND STEEL— Quotations are: 
Bar iron basis, $2.70. Swedish 

iron basis, $4.95; sleigh shoe stce', 
$2.75 ; spring steel, $3.25 ; machinery 
steel, $3.50 ; tool steel, Black Diamond, 
100 lbs., $9.50 ; Jcssop. $13. 

SHEET ZINC — The price is now 
$8.50 for cask lots, and $9 for broken 
lots. 

PIG LEAD— Quoted a $5.85 per cwt. 

AXLE GREASE— "Mica" axle grease 
is quoted at $2.75 per case, and "Dia- 
mond" at $1.60. 

IRON PIPE AND FITTINGS— Re- 
vised prices are as follows: — Black pipe, 



! | inch, $2.65; :; s , $2.80; y 2 , $3.50; %, 
$4.40; I. $6.35; V/ 4 , $8.05; H/o, $10.40; 
2, 13.85; 2y 2 , $19.00; 3, $25.00. Gal- 
vanized iron pipe, % inch. $3.75; y», 
$4.35; %, $5.05; 1, $8.10; V/ 4 , $11.00; 
1%, $13.25; 2, inch, $17.65. Nipples, 
discounts 70 and 10 per cent.; Unions, 
couplings, bushings and plugs, GO per 
cent. 

LEAD PIP F— The price, $7.80, is 
firmly maintained in view of the ad- 
vancing lead market. 

GALVANIZED IRON— Quoted a s 
follows :— Apollo, 16 gauge, $3.90 ; 
18 and 20, $4.10 ; 22 and 24, 
$4.15; 26, $4.40; 2S, $4.65, 30 gauge or 
10% oz., $4.95; Queen's Head, 24, $4.50; 
26, $4.65; 28, $5.00. 

TIN PLATES— We now quote as fol- 
lows : 1C charcoal, 20 x 2b, box, $9.50; 
IX charcoal, 20 x 28, $1J.50; XXI char- 
coal, 20 x 28, $13.50. 

TEKNE PLATES— Quoted at $9. 

CANADA PLATES— Quoted as fol- 
lows: Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24, 
$3.40; 20 x 28, $3.65; full polished, $4.15. 

BLACK SHEETS— Prices are : 10 to 
16 gauge, 100 lbs., $3.50; 18 to 22, 
$3.75; 24, $3.90; 26, $4; lib, $4.10. 

PETROLEUM AND GASOLINE — 
Silver Star in brls. per gal., 20c; Sun- 
light in bi Is, per gal., 21c; per case, 
$2.30; Eocene in brls, per gal., 23c; per 
case, $2.50; Pennoline in brls., per eal.. 
24c; Crystal Spray, 23c; Silver Light, 
21c; Engine gasoline in barrels, per 
gal., 28c, f.o.b. Winnipeg in cases, $2.75. 

PAINTS, OILS AND TTJRPEN- 
T1NF— Turpentine is firm at the recent 
advance. White lead, pure, $6.50 to $7.50, 
according to brand ; bladder putty in 
barrels, 2-ic; in kegs, 3. : ;c; turpentine, 
barrel lols, Winnipeg, $1.01; Calgary, 
$1.08; Lethbridgc, $1.08; Edmon- 
ton, $1.09. Less than barrel lots 
5c per callon advance. Linseed oil, 
raw, Winnipeg, 67c; Calgary, 74c; 
Lethbridge, 74c; Edmonton, 75c; boiled 
oil. 3c. per gal. advance on these prices. 

WINDOW GLASS— We quote : 16-oz. 
O.G., single, in 50-ft. boxes— 16 to 25 
united inches, $2.25; 26 to 40, $2.40; 
16-oz. O.G., sinsrle, in 100-ft. cases — 
16 to 25 united inches. $4; 26 to 40, 
$4.52; 41 to 50, $4.75; 50 to 60. $5.25; 
61 to 70. $5.75. 21-oz. C.S.. double, in 
]00-ft. oases — 26 to 40 united inches, 
$7.35; 41 to 50. $8.40; 51 to 60. $9.45: 
61 to 70. $10.50; 71 to 80. $11.55; 81 to 
85. $12.60; 86 to 90, $14.75; 91 to 95. 
$17.30. 

37 - 




SUPERB EMPIRE 

The Perfect Cooker 

We draw the attention of the Western Trade to the 
Superb Empire Planished Steel Range. The oven 
daor is not only braced but also spring balanced. A 
lever is attached to the front key-plate to raise it as de- 
sired, and contrived also to hold it up if necessary. The 
Superb throughout is substantial, its nickel dress alone 
making it a ready seller, besides, it is made by a West- 
ern stove factory for Western people only. 
The Western Stove Makers 




J-V MANUFACTURERS OF_^j 

F©Q°tt\WnM a m , O trait sio © , 
DAVID REID & CO. 



Hardware Commission Merchants 

Room 22 Stanley Block, - Winnipeg, Man. 

Correspondence is solicited from 
manufacturers wishing a represen- 
tative in Winnipeg and the North 
West. 



We have sub-agents 
throughout Western Canada 



BEST OF REFERENCES 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Because "The Twentieth Century 
belongs to Canada" the birth of 

• •• J. IlLtM 

Financial Post 

Was as inevitable as it was necessary 

first issue . Saturday, 

25,000 copies f JAN . 12th, 1907 

This Weekly will contain all the financial news available on 
investments. Accuracy is aimed at, but technicality is avoided. 

The Post will print reliable news in a readable manner. 
Finance has its romances as well as its dry bones. 

Every Investor, large or small, can find something that 
will interest him. Canadian securities will be fully and completely 
dealt with each week. 

A page will be devoted to banks and banking interests. There 
will be special articles for depositors. 

Every Young Man determined to make a success of life will 
be interested in the self-help articles. 



SPECIAL FEATURES OF THE FIRST ISSUE 

THEN AND NOW — An entertaining and instructive story in parallel 
columns, showing what a well-known London paper thought of C.P.R. in l88l, and 
what it thinks 25 years later. 

THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC— AN INVESTOR'S ANALYSIS— THE 
QUESTION OF FIXED CHARGES— A COMPLETE MAP OF THE SYSTEM. 

THE HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY-The graphic story of the market 
advances of our oldest joint stock company. 

Other special articles by expert writers on Municipal Bonds, the Grain Situa- 
tion in the West, Branch Banks in the North-West, Cobalt Considerations, the 
Saving Habit 

THE FINANCIAL POST OF CANADA is a twentieth cen- 
tury newspaper which no investor in Canada — especially at this 
time— can afford to be without. 

Mailed to any address in the Dominion, United States, Great 
Britain, and Europe for $3.00 annually. 




PUBLISHED BY 



THE FINANCIAL POST COMPANY 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR NEAREST OFFICE 

TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG LONDON, ENQ. 

10 Front St. E. 232 McGill St. 511 Union Bank Bldg. 88 Fleet St. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS 

When sending catalogues for review, manu- 
facturers would confer a favor by pointing out 
the new articles that they contain. It would 
assist the editor in writing the review. 

Hy mentioning Hardware and Mktai. to 
show that the writer in m the trade, a copy of theao 
catalogues or other printed tout tor will be soot by 
the rimis whose addresses are given. 



Letter Opener. 
The London Rolling Mill Company, 
London, Ont., [rave supplied their cus- 
tomers with a very neat paper knife 
f < > i Hit' office desk. The novelty is a 
very useful and certain to be a Lasting 
reminder. Customers who have not re- 
ceived samples should mention this 
paper when ashing Eor one. 

Contractors' Supply Calendar. 
Aniiot, Lecours & Lariviere, Mon- 
treal, dealers in contractors' supplies, 
are sending to the trade a 1907 calen- 
dar, containing illustrations of several, 
of the lines carried by them. This 
calendar is of a good size for office use 
and will be sent to anyone who men- 
tions this paper when writing. 

Memoranda Calendar. 
A very neat calendar of a most sen- 
sible sort has been issued by Sybry, 
Seai Is & Co., Cannon Steel Works, 
Sheffield, England. The upper part of 
the card shows three views of the in- 
terior and exterior of the works, and 
the calendar portion has the business 
man's week from Monday t<> Saturday 
on separate sheets with small blanks 
for memoranda each day. The reverse 
side contains a great deal of informa- 
tion of interest to metal workers. No 
doubt the publishers would be glad to 
semi copies to any of our readers who 
make application. 

Carborundum Booklet. 
The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 
N.Y., in a recent booklet, illustrate and 
list a few of (he standard forms of 
carborundum stones, such as razor 
hones, oil stones, knife sharpeners, 
pocket htones, etc. Mention this paper 
if a copy is desired. 

New List on Horse Nails. 
The Canada Horse Nail Company, 
Montreal, have issued under date Jan. 
1>I, a revised hardware trade price list, 
|jor their hot-forged •'<"' brand horse 
nails. As several important altera- 
tions have been made, which are of in- 
terest to that portion of the trade deal- 
ing in horseshoe nails, we herewith rc- 

pr< duce the list in full: No. 4, $4.50; 
No. 5, $3.75; No. 6, $3.50; No. 7, $3.25; 
No. 8. $3.00; No. 9, $3.00; No. 10 and 
i. $2.75 per box. All patterns, 
oval and countersunk, are the same 
price. They direct the attention of the 
trade, in making comparisons, to the 
fact that their standard of lengths are 
unchanged, and remain the same as 
adopted by them for many years, these 
differing materially from the lengths 



Interior 
Decoration 



THAT 
RETAINS 
IT'S 
BEAUTY ! 



Our 
Metallic 
Ceilings 

AND 

Walls 



M.RCo 



are in highest favor with practical and 

artistic people alike. 

We make countless beautiful designs, 

with borders, friezes, dados and every ilelail 

to match ; they are easily applied, in old 

buildings over plaster, or in new ones where 

plaster is not required. 

They are suited for every building where 

practical, durable beauty is desired in the 

decorative finish, and are fire-proof and sanitary. 

EXPENSIVE ? Not at all. First cost is small. 

The plates are so carefully made they fit accurately. 

We will give you an estimate if you send an outline 

showing shape and measurements of your ceilings and 

walls. Let us hear from you. 

The Metallic RoofitlgCo. Limited, Toronto. Canada, 



Western Canada Factory, 797 Notre Dame Ave., Winnipeg;. Man. 



►= 



for the same numbers used by other 
manufacturers. The "0" brand No. 9 
is the same length as other number 
eights and the "I"" brand No. 12 is 
the same length as other number (ens, 
etc. Particulars as to discounts, terms 
and conditions of sale may be had from 
the makers direct on application. 



DIVIDING THE PROFITS. 

News comes from Minnesota of a 
Strange agreement drawn up, signed and 
lived up to hy G. H. O. Roberts, a 
hardwareman conducting a store at No. 
1(18 Western avenue. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Distrusting his fellow men as partners, 
he drew up a document on M,p \2 1803, 
and inscribed the same upon the flyleaf 
of his ledger, repeating it each year 
since. It ran as follows : 

"I promise that, as the Lord shall 
prosper me. I shall act as His steward 
and give to Him as follows : 

" 'If I make $1,000 annually, $100 ; 
$1,500, $250 ; $2,000, $400 ; $2,500, $625; 
$3,000, $1,000; $5,000, $2,500.'" 

Mr. Roberts claims that he has pros- 
pered by carrying out his agreement un- 

39 



til he has reached the last-mentioned 
figures. He says he has no desire to go 
back to his old method of doing busi- 
ness before he made the agreement, and, 
in fact, would he afraid to do so, for he 
is certain that his present business would 
never have grown to its proportions if 
he had continued along the old lines. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON ONT, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDRY AND METAL 
INDUSTRIES 



The Sandwich location offers many 

adva iver othei sted, but 

make any definite an- 

nouni the eorjx ration *s 

intt 

plant of the Goderich Engine 

and ! Co. has been purchased by 

togers Manufacturing Co., of To- 

< i al foundry and railway 

-1 ecialty work will be done in the 

shops. 

Promoters from Harvey, Illinois, have 
been at Windsor looking over a site 

on which they may establish a big 
manufacturing plant if the United 

States Steel Company carries out its 
proposal to build near Sandwich. 

New York capitalists are in com- 
munication with the municipal council 
■ derich, with a view to building a 

$5,000,000 steel plant. The concern 
would employ fifteen hundred hands, 
and would occupy one hundred acres 
of land. 

Luke Thompson, engineer, has brought 
a suit against the Ontario Sewer Pipe 
Company for $10,000. Thompson was 

employed as engineer at the company's 
plant at Mimico, and was badly scalded 
by the breaking of an aliened defective 
connection. 

A big deposit of high grade iron ore 
lias been discovered near Desbarats, 
(Int.. a few miles below the Soo. It is 
said to lie as good as any in the Lake 
Superior country. It lies close to the 
water, and can be shipped to southern 
lake ports easily, making a much 
shorter haul than from Lake Superior. 

The Hamilton and Fori "William 
Navigatii n Company of Hamilton, have 
placed an order with the Canadian 
Shipbuilding Company for an 8,500-ton 
freight steamer, to be built for the 
iron ore, coal, and wheat trade. This 
steamer, which will be one of the 

n the lakes, will be built at the 
shiphuld; any's Port Colborne 

shipyard. The machinery will be built 
in Toronto. 

The cost of copper refining by elec- 
tricity has been reduced greatly in re- 
cent years in the American refineries by 
the introduction i anical devices 

for casting the anode slabs of crude 
cop] er and & r charging and disci 

the vats. According to an article 
by John. B. C. Kershaw in Cassier's 
Magazine, the expenditure on hand 
labor has thus been greatly reduced. 
and the time during which vats are 
laid off for recharging and cleaning has 
curtailed. The current density 
has also been greatly increased by 
the use of improved methods of circul- 
the electrolyte, ami by the ad- 
a very small percentage of 
hydn acid to the copper sul- 

phate solution. 



There are good materials in 
Sherwin-Williams Varnishes 

The best varnish makers that live cannot make good varnish from 
poor materials. Quality varnish must be made from the best ma- 
terials, in the right way, by men who know how. 

The superiority of S-W. Varnishes is due in part to the materials 
we use. Take, for instance, the varnish gums. We are not depend- 
ent upon the local markets for our supply, but import varnish gums 
direct, unsorted. We are thus always sure of the quality. By sorting 
them ourselves, we establish our own grades and are able to use at all 
times the same quality and grade for each varnish. 

Such advantage means much to 
you, as quality is of supreme im- 
portance in building a varnish trade 
that endures. Write today for 
further particulars. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

Canadian Headquarters and 
Plant: I yj Outre Street, 
Montreal, Que. 

Warehouses : S6 York St., 
Toronto; 147 Eannatyne St., 
East, Winnipeg, Man. 

1799 




J. G. WALKER & SONS 

Derby and Dudley 

"Special" Crane Chain for Dredges, Etc. 
Boom Chain. 

Stock or Import 

Anvils Vises 



Prices on Application. 



H. G. EADIE, M0N1REA 



22 St John St., 
L 



40 



HARDWARE AND M E T A «. 



"Dominion Crown" 



Polished Sheets 
■ Polished Canadas. 

Best Quality and Finish 

Stock and Import 

A.C. LESLIE & CO. 

Limited 
MONTREAL 



HAND DRILLING MACHINERY 



We have the best that 
money can buy. 

Our cheaper grades are all 
good serviceable machines. 

The best value in the mar- 
ket whether you want the 
cheap or the dear kind. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



H ESPELER 



ONTARIO 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 

NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co. 



WRIT! US FOR 

PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 



CARRIAGE 
SPRINGS & AXLES 



ANCHOR 
BRAND 






THE CUELPH SPRING & AXLE CO. 

LIMITED 

CUELPH, ONT. 



'MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u .>m 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Mttuufa.otur»r» of- 



Wrlto for Prleo to Salos Afont* 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 
• r to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND. ONT. Limited 

...FULL STOCK... 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPJPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT 

ST. JOHNS. QUE . 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



PRICE and QUALITY 

are two vital element* in 

GILBERTSON^ 

comTeT"" 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 

That means they are soft, smooth, and easily 
worked, that they are flat, well galvanized and 
that they are lower in price than other high 
grade brands. 

MAKER Si 

W. GILBERTSON & CO., Limited, 

PONTARDAWE, SOUTH WALES 

Agent: Alex. Gibb, 13 St. John St., Montreal. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genulno 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6d. and It. Canliter* 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Clothi and Papers, etc. 

f inn Mills, Loita, EiM 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, - 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



PLAIN TROJAN HOOP IRON 



made in four widths, £, £, 1 and 
1 inch, put up as cut in rolls of 
2,030 feet, continuous, packed in 
barrels of 500 pounds. 

STRONGER THAN ORDINARY HOOP 
AND CHEAPER 




J. N. WARMINTON 



43 Scctt St., Toronto 



207 St. James St., Montreal 



41 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Glass 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



Import 



Window 



Glass 



LOWEST PRICES 
ASK FOR THEM 



Write Nearest Office 



TORONTO 
MONTREAL 

WINNIPEG 



Building and Industrial News 

IUrhwiki A.ND Mini, would be pleased to receire from any authoritative source building and industrial newi 
of any sort, the formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, 
factories, foundries or other works, railway or mining news All correspondence will be 
treated as confidential when desired. 



A new Y.M.C.A. building at St. John, 
N.B., will be erected at the cost of'$60,- 
000. 

John McPherson Company, Hamilton, 
is increasing the capital from $100,000 
to $500,000. 

Building permits have been issued in 
Toronto from January 8 to 12, 1907, 
totalling $55,000. 

The .Merchants Bank, of Toronto, have 
procured premises at Street sville, and 
will erect a brick bank in the Spring. 

The Cyclone Woven Wire Fence Com- 
pany, of Toronto, have increased their 
capital stock from $75,000 to $100,000. 

The National Spring & Wire Company 
have leased a factory in St. Catharines 
and will get into operation in the near 
future. 

The Imperial Coal Company, of Beers- 
ville, N.B., are planning to establish a 
brick. making plant with a capacity of 
20,000 per day. 

The Wmton Automobile Company will 
establish a branch factory in Toronto. 
It is also intended to establish fac- 
tories in England. 

The plants of the Tilson Manufactur- 
ing Company and the Standard Fitting 
and Valve Company, of Guelph, will be 
rapidly pushed to completion in the 
early Spring. 

The Temiskaming & Northern Ontario 
Railway Commission is asking for ten- 
ders for the construction of general of- 
fices at North Bay, at the cost of $25,- 
000 or $30,000. 

Cudahy Company, manufacturers of 
Dutch Cleanser, and II. B. Johnstone 
Company, leather manufacturers, of 
Toronto, sustained a total loss of $12,- 
niiii by fire, which occurred on Wednes- 
day. 

The pipe works of New Westminster, 
B.C., are rapidly nearing completion. 
The main building is 138 feet by 68 feet. 
It is expected that the company will be 
turning out pipe by the middle of next 
month. 

There were erected in Montreal during 
1906, 1,484 new buildings, valued at $7,- 
'45,023, as compared with 1,145 valued 
at K 1,779,380 for the previous year. Ten 
structures exceeded in estimated cost 
$100,000 each. 

Large consignments of sisal have been 
landed al Halifax this season by the 
Mexican Liner Sokoto. It is estimated 
that one hundred carloads per month 
will be imported via Halifax for Ontario 
manufacturers of rope. 

Mr. Menzies ami 11. S. McLean, doing 
business under the name of the Sydney 
Electric and Construction Company, 
have dissolved partnership, and business 
will be carried on by Mr. Menzies and 
J. Morley, under the old name. 

The Hugh Johnson Syndicate, >f Ot- 
tawa, have procured premises on Queen 
si reel, Toronto, opposite the city hall. 
The price paid for this property wa ; in 
the neighborhood of $175,000, and con- 
tracts have been let for a SK.bOO I rick 
building. 

42 



The contract for the locomotive shops 
.it Honcton, N.B., for the Intercolonial 
Railway, to replace those recently burn- 
ed, has been awarded to a Montreal linn, 
at a price of about half a million dol- 
lars, and Will be built entirely of con- 
crete and steel. 

It is feared that the West Indian Elec- 
tric Company, which operates tram cars, 
telephones and an electric light system 
in Kingston, Jamaica, must have lost 
heavily by the earthquake. The com- 
pany is owned in Montreal. The capital 
out is $800,000 stock and $600,000 bonds. 

The Ontario Wind Engine and Pump 
Co., of Winnipeg, has been awarded the 
contract for a 75,000-gallon water tank 
on a 50-foot tower for the waterworks 
system of the town of Areola. The wa- 
ter is being brought to the town from 
four or five miles distant and forced in- 
to the tower for domestic use and fire 
protection. 

The Toronto Plastering and Supply 
Company assigned to Osier Wade last 
week. This company was incorporated 
about a year ago, but it made a poor 
start, locking up all the capital in build- 
ings and plant. No money was left for 
running expenses, and an effort to pro- 
cure capital for this purpose was not 
successful. 

Nine new industries have btcn located 
in Toronto during 1906. These are the 
Kindall Bed and Mattress Co., St. 
Louis ; Blanchite Process Paint Co., 
New York ; Canada Bolt and Nut Co., 
Boston; De Sauga Silk Co., St. -Eti- 
enne, France ; Chemical Laboratories ; 
Dominion Carriage Works, Berlin Elec- 
trical Manufacturing Company. 

•The Sherbrooke Novelty Companv has 
been incorporated with a share capital 
of $20,000 for the purpose of manufac- 
turing electrical and mechanical ap- 
pliances, household utensils and small- 
wares. The head office will be at Sher- 
brooke, Que., and the directors will be 
E. R. Ebbitt and A. C. Snowden, Mon- 
treal ; R. A. Wright, A. T. Boydell and 
.1. A. Swan, Sherbrooke. 

The ratepayers of Port Arthur have 
voted to guarantee $75,000 worth of 
bonds for the Meisel Manufacturing Co., 
ami to loan the Seaman-Kent Co. $15,- 
000. The Meisel Co. will establish 
works for the manufacture of mill ma- 
chinery and heavy harvesting imple- 
ments. The Seaman-Kent Co.'s factory 
will be devoted to the manufacture of 
hardwood flooring, mantels, etc. 

A large brick building at Point I'M 
ward, foimerlv used as a warehouse ami 
pattern shop by the Canada Machinery 
Company, was destroyed by fire on Jan. 
1"), witli a loss of fifteen thousand dol- 
lars. The building contained patterns 
formerly used by the company valued at 
five thousand dollars. The origin of the 
fire is unknown. The main part of the 
plant was destroyed by fire two years 
ago, and only the pattern shop and of- 
fice stood. The latter was threatened, 
and was saved with difficulty. The loss 
is partly covered by insurance. 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



The Schultz Manufacturing Com- 
pany has been incorporated witlj a 
Bbare capital of $50,003 to purchase 
the business of Ernest Schultz, known 
as The Schultz Manufacturing Com- 
pany, makers of stamped, pressed and 
spun metal goods, castings, lamps. 

lanterns, etc., with head office at 

Hamilton and directors to he E. I'. 

Schultz, A. II. Brittain and B. A. 
Schultz, id' Hamilton. 

The Western Canada Development 
Company has been incorporated with 
a $1,000,000 capital, to carry on busi- 
ness as miners, coal miners, nil 
producers, refiners and gas makers, in 
any part of the Dominion of Canada 
with head office to he at Winnipeg, in- 
corporating J. S. Hough, A C. Pi 
son, C. Williams, K. R. Lindsay ami W. 
M. Graham, all of Winnipeg. 

A wire cloth factory, which will give 
(employment to about 700 people, will 
be established in Montreal in the 
spring-. The plant will also manufac- 
ture wire screens and many kinds of 
wire novelties. The new company, 
which will he largely composed of Am- 
erican capitalists will be capitalized 
at $200,000. A factory for the manu- 
facture of spokes, wheels and other 
articles of wood used in the building' 
of vehicles will also be established. 
Montreal will be the distributing point 
for the various province?. 



A NOVEL DOOR LOCK. 

A door lock of decidedly unique form 
has recently been invented by Peter Eb- 
beson, of St. Paul, Neb. While the con- 
struction of this lock is not complicat- 
ed, yet it has been ingeniously designed 
to prevent operation with a false key. 
Furthermore, it comprises a latch of 
such form as to prevent shaking or rat- 
tling of the door. The lock consists of 
three disk-like sections, A, B, and C, 
the disk B being stationary and the oth- 
ers revolvable. The disks are mounted in 
a socket in the door and project from 
opposite sides thereof. The latch is op- 
crated by a pair of knobs at opposite- 
sides of the door, which are respectively 
secured to the disks A and C. In the 
face of the disk A is an eccentric slot, 
adapted to receive a stud projecting 
from the door frame. By operating the 
knob of disk A the latter may be turn- 
ed to engage the stud in the eccentric 
slot, thus locking the door. The disk 
' is connected with the disk A by a 
series of bevel gears, so that by operat- 
ing the knob of disk C, it is possible to 
rotate Hie disk A to latch or unlatch 
the door. In order to lock the door a 
novel mechanism has been provided in 
the central disk B, a barrel being mount- 
ed in this disk. This barrel is provided 
with a bolt, which is adapted to engage 
a slot in one of the bevel gears, and 
thus prevent rotation of the oilier two 
disks. In the barrel is a tumbler, which 
is carried on a short shaft mounted to 
slide in slots in the barrel. This tumb- 
ler is provided with a projection at its 
upper end adapted normally to register 
with the central one of three flanges, 
projecting from a block above Now, in 
order to unlock the hitch, a key is in- 
setted in the barrel, and this presses 
the tumbler, when the projection t here- 



on clears tin- cenl ral pi oject ion, and the 
ii.n id may he i oi ated i" mo\ e t he bolt 
clear of the bevel gears, The tumble) 
is held in normal position by a pail ol 

springs which bear against its shaft It 

will be observed that the ends of the 

tumble] are of odd form, which the key 

musl tn to prevenl the tumble] [rem 

tilting on its axis when being pushed 

clear of the projection. If a false key 

is introduced, I he tumbler will bi till ed 
up into engagement with the outei pro 

ject ions. 



48-STOREY BUILDING. 

The Metropolitan Life Co will erect 
a tower in New fork, a- an annex 
to their main building The tower 

when complete will be the tallest stTUC 
hire on earth. Height above sidewalk 
i, 'Ml! ft.; number of stories below side 
walk, 2; grand total Bool area of new- 
Metropolitan building, 1,035,663 square 
feet (about 25 acres.) 



A REMARKABLE WRECK. 

An extraordinary and expensive ce 

ment advertisement was furnished by a 
recent shipwreck. The ship Socoa 
bound for San Francisco with a cargo 
of cement for use in the rebuilding of 
the city, was wrecked off the Lizard on 
the Cornwall coast. The ship struck a 
rock, which tore a huge hole in bet 
side, and remained fastened as upon a 
pivot. When the salvage crew arrived 
to see about taking the Socoa from her 
perilous position, says The Cement Age, 
the men found a remarkable condition 
of affairs. The water had entered the 
hold and its action upon the cargo had 
caused the cement to set. It had ac- 
commodatingly set hard around the 
rock that piereed the side of the ship, 
which now remains fastened there per- 
manently in its unique position. The 
entire cargo has become as hard as 
stone, and nothing can be done with the 
ship except to dismantle as much of the 
wood as can be removed. The hull will 
remain there for many years as a con- 
spicuous advertisement for the cement 
manufacturers 



CAPEWELL SALESMEN'S DINNER. 

The first annual dinner of the Ontario 
salesmen of the t'apewell Horse Nail 
Company, of Toronto, was held at Me 
Conkey's restaurant, Toronto, on .Jan. 
7th. and proved to be a very successful 
gathering, of a nature half social and 
half business. The chair was taken In- 
die manager, Chas. II. Fleming, and for 
over three hours an Interesting talk en- 
sued regarding trade conditions and the 
progress the company had made (luring 
the past year. It is pleasant to record 
that the prevailing note of the discus- 
sion was one of decided optimism, and 
.ill the salesmen present reported favor- 
ably on conditions in their respective 
territories, and that there was a gen- 
erally expressed determination that 1907 
should eclipse all previous records An 
attractive menu card was prepared. 
each dish bearing some reference to the 
company's product. Those present were 
("has. II. Fleming, manager, F. E Mews, 
chief accountant; and Messrs. .1. dot ti- 
ers, W. T. Crosby, F. May, C. Ardies, 
W A Dean. G. W. West and J. R. 
Myers, traveling salesmen 

43 



BEST ELBOWS 



FOR 



CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 





(SUym / nama>u 



PLAIN ROUND. 

CORRUGATED. 



Made in . . . 

6 Materials. 
5 Angles. 
14 Sizes. 
1,225 Varieties. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 

Ferdinand Dieckhann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AVE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Accidental 
Discharge ^ 
Impossible-^" - * 1 

True "only if it is an 



This is why 




IverJohnson 

The positive safety device is the exclusive patent of the Iver Johnson 
Revolver. See the lever between the hammer and the firing pin ? This 
lever is raised only when the trigger is pulled, receives the blow of the 
hammer and transmits it to the firing pin. That's why you can throw 
a loaded Iver Johnson against a stone wall without fear — no discharge 
can possibly follow, as the hammer never touches the firing pin. An Iver Johnson 
never fails when you pull the trigger and never "goes off" when you don't. 

Iver Johnson Safety Automatic 

Prices— Hammer $6.50, Hammerless $7.50. 

Iver Johnsons are sold by dealers the ■world over, or direct from us if your dealer won't supply 

Please send for descriptive catalogue, free ufion request. It tells all about it. 
IVER JOHNSON'S ARMS AND CYCLE WORKS, FITCHBVRG. MASS. 



Will Hold up a Shelf 

That • what a shelf brackt for. 
For tlili purpose there can he 
Nothing Bitter. Nothing 
heap KB than the BRADLEY 8TEEL 
BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The Baring on freight ii a good profit 
atide from the lower price at which the goods 
are sold. Order direct or through your jobbers. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., 
' N«w Hivtn, Conn.. 




"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 



Made in G sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " EmlyD ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 



CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 



Cables— 
*'Mnrhinery." Newport 



Emlyc Engineering WrtV 
VtwpnRT.MnH. Fnt.i at*e 



THE FINANCIAL POST. 
To till one "[ the greatest journalistic 
openings ye1 presenting itself in Can- 
ada, The Financial Post has appeared, 
under the direction of Lt.-Col. J. Ii. 
MacLean, of the Mad. can Publishing 
Co., Montreal, Toronto and Winnipeg, 
and Mr Stcwarl Houston, a well-known 
financial writer, of Toronto. By its 
first number, issued on Salurd.iv last, 
the paper proves ils ability to till the 
position. The aim of the publication as 
set forth b\ its publishers is to present 
to the public in .■ popular manner ac- 
curate information relating to the finan- 
cial interests and t he legit imate invest- 
ments of ( '.mad, i — not only news on 
these subjects, bu1 the results of special 
enquiry from the best authoritative 
sources by expert writers In the first 
number appear articles on the Hudson's 
I5,iv Company, the Grand Trunk Pacific, 
Banks in the Northwest, Cobalt Com- 
parisons, and an especially interesting 
collection of financial authorities' opin- 
ions regarding t'l'.R . 25 years ago and 
.it the present day. The Post begins 
under auspicious circumstances, in the 
thai it has behind it a well-tried 
publishing firm, and the early struggles 
of the ordinary periodical will be obviat- 
ed bv an organization alreadv perfected 
Th<- MacLean Publishing Co., which was 



established 20 years ago, is now the 
largest concern of its kind in Canada, 
and owns six trade papers, The Busy- 
Man's Magazine and a number of pro- 
vincial dailies and weeklies— twenty-one 
in all. 



ST. JOHN JOBBERS MEET. 

The annual meeting of the St. John 
Iron and Hardware Association of N.B., 
was held on .January 8, and the follow- 
ing officers were elected : President, W. 
s. Fisher; vice-president, J. M. Robert- 
son : secretary-treasurer, .John J. 
Barry ; directors, YV. H. Thome, Thomas 
McAvity, M. E. Agar. 

Executive committee, .J. M. Robert- 
son, W. S. Fisher, \\ . II. Thome, Thom- 
as McAvity, M. E. Agar, John J. 
Barry. 

Wholesale committee, Hudson & Fish- 
er, W. II. Thome & Co., Ltd., S. Hay- 
ward Co., Ltd., M. E. Agar, .lames 
Robertson Co., Limited; T. McAvitj «S 
Sons, Robertson, Foster & Smith ; I & 
E. R. Burpee, McClary Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Manufacturers' committee, .lames Fen- 
der, George McAvity, George W. Ketch 
R B Emerson, John Keeffe, S. 
Elkin, M. F. Irwin. 

44 



Manufacturers' Agents 



CHARLES H. FOX 

Vancouver, B.C. 

MANUFACTURERS' AQENT 

Selling to the Hardware Jobbers Only. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



ALEX ANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John 8treet, Montreal 



Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



H. W. MITCHELL 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

Correspondence is solicited from manufacturers 
wishing a representative in Winnipeg". 

Travellers call regularly on the wholesale and 
retail trade in Western Canada. 

Highest references and financial responsibility. 



Scott, Bathgate & Co. 

BROKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANT8 

Cor. Notre Dame St. East and Victoria St., WINNIPEG, Canada 
Storage and Warehousing a Specialty. 

First-class facilities in a thoroughly modern brick ware- 
house centrally located on the railway track. 



Every Day 

you have call for something new 
in Blacksmiths' and Carriage-making Sup- 
plies. Why not stock our goods ? They 
include a rare variety of money-makers 
That's what other merchants are doing. 
Let us tell you the secret of our prices. 
Send for catalogue to-day. 

Look at our list of Agencies. It will pay you to get acquainted. 
AGENCIES: 

Ontario Asphalt Block Co., Ltd., Walkerville. Out. 

The Standard Paint and Varnish Works, Limited, Windsor 

Out. 
The Frank Miller Co., New York, NY, 
Windsor Turned Goods Co., Ltd., Windsor, Ont. 
The Cod boy Carriace Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 
The Dowsley Spring & Axle Co , Chatham, Ont. 
The Neverslip Manufacturing Co., New Brunswick, N.J 
Michael Hunter & Son, Ltd., Sheffield, Eug. 
English Standard Varnish Company. 
Honney Vise & Tool Works, Inc., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Walker Steel Range Co., Ltd., Grimsby, Ont. 
Melinks Home Deposit Vaults, Toledo, Ohio 
The Srarls Mfg Co., Newark, N, J. 
Proprietor Balmoral Oil. 

LUDGER GRAVEL 

22 and 28 Jacques Cartier Square 
MONTREAL 

PHONES : 
Offlco, Bell, Main tl2. After 6 p.m., Est 2314. 

House, Bell, Main 641. Quebec Office, 752. 

Tel. Merchants 964 



The advertiser talks to 
you through Hardware and 
Metal. You should talk to 
him through correspondence. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISE/IENTS. 




Advertisements under this heading 2c. a word first 
ntertion ; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) arc allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompan\ all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlooked. 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



ANTED — Good practical tinsmith; $1H.00 weekly 
to <he right-man; steady job. Apply H. H. 
Gervan, Chilliwack, B.C. (5) 

ANTED —Man with two or three thousand dollars 
to take half interest in old established hardware 
and tinsmith business in good town. Box 575, 
HARDWARE AND METAL. (4) 

WANTED— Two first-class hardware salesmen, one 
to travel west and north of London, and one to 
travel Toronto and vicinity; reply by letter stat- 
ing experience, references, age and salary, to Box 576, 
HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. (3) 

WANTED — Experienced young man, thoroughly 
conversant with builders' hardware, as traveller 
for the city. Apply stating references and salary 
equired to E. G. Prior & Co., Ltd., Victoria, B.C. (3) 



w 



ANTED — An experienced hardware man at once 
apply stating wages required to The Geo. Taylor 
Hardware Co., Ltd., New Liskeard, Ont. [4] 



w 



ANTED — Experienced pricer for wholesale hard- 
ware; none but experienced man need apply. 
Box 578, HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



HARDWARE stock about $7,000, including set of 
tinners' tools; stock is all new and situated on 
main line C-P.R. in Saskatchewan town of 1,800 
population; building can be leased, is brick, two 
storeys and basement ; net profit $4,000 vearly. Box 
577, HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto. [7] 

HARDWARE BUSINESS established 17 years for 
sale— including stoves, ranges and tinware ;a good 
plumbing and tinshop in connection ; stock about 
$fi,000. J. D. Murdoch & Co., Simcoe, Ont. [6] 

FOR SALE — Hardware and tinware business in 
Western Ontario town of about 3,000 population ; 
one opposition; turnover seventeen to twenty 
thoMsand dollars. Apply Box 679, HARDWARE AND 
METAL Toronto. 



HARDWARE AND TINWARE business for sale in a 
thriving town in Eastern Ontario; stock reduced 
to $1,500; good dairying country, rare chance 
for new beginner; going out of business on account of 
ill health. Apply at once to D. Courville, Maxville, 
Ont. [3] 

COR SALE-A fully equipped Wire Mill and Nail 
1/ Factory as a going concern, with about 500 tons 
of wire rods; factory situated on 150 ft. of water- 
front with trackage optional to buyer. B.C. Wire and 
Nail Co., Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. (7) 



SITUATION WANTED. 



II 



ARDWAREMAN (28) open for engagement; west. 
Box 91. HARDWARE AND METAL, Win- 
nipeg. (4) 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 



Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with th-; Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address Is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, $4.80.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



ARC YOU "FIXING LP?" 












One of our Embossed Metal Ceilings. 

Metal Ceilings are a double-barrelled investment for the hardwareman, because 

They make a bright, attractive store, and 

They excite a demand for metal interiors. 
Pick out your ceiling from our CLASSIFIED DESIGNS. They 
offer a wide choice of rich interiors at a moderate cost. 

ASK US TO ESTIMATE. 

The Metal Shingle & Silling Co., Limited, Preston, Ont. 



Hardware Dealers Should Wake Up- 

to the fact thatSHEET METAL BUILDING GOODS could be made a large 
and ever increasing factor in their business. Farmers, manufacturers and 
all owners and builders are daily demanding these goods because they fill 
satisfactorily the gap which is being left by the diminishing supply of 
good and cheap timber. Some dealers have alteady established a consider- 
able trade in this line, proving that it can be done, but it's "only as a drop 
in the bucket" compared to what's to come. If the HARDWARE 
DEALERS and TINSMITHS don't look after this valuable trade, they will 
live to regret it. Some one else will reap the harvest. 

Don't sav— "There's nothing in it for llie"— because there certainly is, 
providing you have the RIGHT GOODS and the RIGHT FIRM behind them. 
It doesn't matter about the manufacturers who sell direct to the consumer. 
One good, square firm, who will PROTECT and HELP a good orginization 
of agents, can, with those agents, do more business than three or four of 
the other kind. 

We can show you— all we need to prove to you how this combination 
will work in 1907 is some more good agents— we've got the goods and 
the other qualifications. One of our representatives will be along your 
way soon after New Years to talk to you on the subject. If you are 
interested drop us a line at once and make certain that you will not be 
missed. 



The 



missea. 

GALT ART METAL CO., Limited, GALT, ONT. 

Western Distributing Agents, THE McCLARY MFC. CO., Winnipeg and Calgary. 



Persons addressing advertisers will kindly 
mention having seen their advertisement in 
Hardware and Metal. 



45 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




RAW AND BOILED OIL. 
For some purposes i.i\\ oil is prefer- 
able in boiled. The raw oil does not 
harden as quickly .is the boiled, conse- 
quently is more in evidence for outside 
work. In speaking on the subject of oils 
.in old veteran ol the brush, quoted by 
the Canadian Painter, said : — "Raw lin- 
seed oil generallj finds most favor. It 
is clear, works freely, and in white lead 
paint on outside work requires the addi- 
tion of little driers it allows the paint 
to cover well, and is durable. Mixed in 
raw oil a paint dries with a glossy sur- 
face, which is a factor of durability. 
Moiled oil. on the other hand, is tor 
white lead paints, less satisfactory than 
raw. Though a paint mixed with it may 
go further, n docs not cover so well, is 
apt to discolor light tints, is harder to 
spread, less durable, and .1 constant 
source of blistering. Where the use of 
boiled <'il comes in is in mixing dark 
colors for outside work, such as Bruns- 
wick green, Indian red, bronze green 
and such colors, obtained by a painter 
in a dry state. The comparatively thick 
condition of boiled oil assures a better 
under these circumstances, and as- 
sures their drying under ordinary con- 
ditions without the addition of driers. '' 

TURPENTINE MARKETS. 

The following is an extract from the 
Savannah Naval Stores Review, on the 
cause of the advance of turpentine : "So 
far this Winter there have been but three 
or four days that could be called cold, 
and there has been an absence of rain 
equally noticeable. As a result of this 
state of the weather the turpentine 
farms have practically cleaned up every- 
thing in sight. The boxes, as one man 
remarked, have been "wiped dry," and 
everyone is looking for an almost total 
cessation of receipts at any time. The 
impression prevails in trade circles thai 
the late receipts ol Hie season of l!Hj(i-07 
and the early receipts of 1!H)7-UX will be 
noticeably small. As a result Hie feel- 
ing prevails thai conditions are in favoi 
of a continuance of high values, and that 
even better values than at present pre- 
vailing are not unlikel-- in both splits, 
turpentine and lower grades of rosins. 
Buyers seem desirous to gather in stocks 
of turps while there are any to be had, 
although they naturally do not hke to 
run the market up at their own expense. 
Stocks are nol heavy and as there are 
probably three months ahead duiing 
which the consumers must he lid tiom 
the stuff now in hand and '' '1! Id - 

to arrive there appears to be good I.;, sis 
lor the bullish feeling thai is 1 1 •ginning 
to show i t self, and which maj bring im- 
portant developments a t any time." 

PROFIT IN PAINTS 
In the modern, well-stocked hardware 
store ready-mixed and readj to-use 
paint is one of the important staples. 
It is a convenient commodity, a g 
seller and a profit-maker. Tin- entei 
prising retailer will, therefore, see to it 
that his paint stock i- kept complete 



and fresh and that it is given its lull 
share of display in tlir st< 

The meat bulk of the ready-mixed 
paints carried in stock by hardware 
dealers i- the product of well known and 
responsible firms who-'- guarantee 01 
weights and measures may be relied 
upon. The quantities required for any 
given amount <>i space t" lie covered 
may therefore be learned from the deafr 
er with accuracy, wherebj waste and 
unnecessary expense arc avoided and 
considerable annoyance to both dealei 
and consumer is obviated. 

In buying ready-mixed paints prepared 
by one of the well-established paint 
houses the purchaser has the satisfac- 
tion of knowing that he is getting 
much better paint that can be prepared 
by hand, finely ground anil perfect lor 
all purposes in its completed state: 

Another advantage of the ready-mi \ed 
paints handled by the hardware dealer 
is that the colors are accurate and uni- 
Eorm at all times, so that when any- 
color has to be duplicated it can be 
done with exactitude and confidence. In 
the manufacture of such paints high- 
salaried chemists and scientific experts 
superintend the various processes fur 
the makers, and the finest machinery 
being used, under the factory system, 
the results obtained are at all times 



uniform and exact. Manufacturing in 
large quantities also makes the product 
cheapei than hand-mixed paints, as well 
as more reliable and convenient. 

In wearing and lasting qualities ready- 
mixed paints of g I brands are SU 

perior to any others, while varieties oi 
colors and shades can be obtained thai 
are unknown or impossible with hand 
mixing. 

\"t the hast important advantage 
gained by the use of readj mixed paints 

is the saving of time. These paints are 
always read] for use and there is true 
economy in their use. 

Millions of dollars are invested in the 
paint business of Canada, and each 
maker strives to obtain the highesl per 

lection of his product in all meritorious 
qualities. The result is that the retail- 
er can buy stocks with confidence, know 
ing that he is securing paints that will 
give every possible satisfaction to the 
consumer. 

Ready-mixed paints are a profitable 
line for the hardware dealer to handle 
and a large business can often be work- 
ed uj) in special brands. In communi- 
ties where such paints are not in gen- 
eral use a little systematic advertising 
of their merits will often bring about 
their use in large quantities to the ad- 
vantage of all concerned. 



■ ■*•» %• ■«.-». -».-^-*--»--%-'%.-%.-».-»'^ -*•-%• •*.•%.■». -»■».-».-».-%.•».-».•».•»•». ■»..» . 



LISTEN 



You are having all kinds of inducements, "good 
and otherwise," "mostly otherwise," offered for 
your Paint business. Exclude the hot air, then 
boil them down to reasonable business facts, 
and compare what is left with our Hollywood 
proposition, and we get the business as sure as 
you are alive. 

Hollywood Paints wear on the job, not off. 

In Paste, Ready Mixed and Floor. 



I| The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA. 

Stocks at 

VANCOUVER, B.C., c/o DURAND MERCHANDISE CO. 
WINNIPEG, MAN., c'o MASON & HICKEY. 



LIMITED 



^■^^<^«»^^^»^»«»^^^^^^»^^^^^^'^'»^^^'^»^^.^^'^>'»^^^^^»^-^- 



46 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Are You Featuring the Proper Paint ? 

The paint that builds up trade, because it gives thorough and tasting satisfaction 
the paint that covers more surface and lasts longer than any other paint on the market. 
That is 

holds its color, is impervious to change. 
and stands in a class by itself for Ueauty, 
Durability and Economy. 



NEW ERA PAINT 



N.B.—See our Catalogue before making up your order list for Spring deliveries. 

STANDARD PAINT AND VARNISH WORKS CO., LIMITED 

WINDSOR ONTARIO 



Are You Ashamed 
of Yourself 

FOR handling old floor paints 
which are always rubbing off 
because they are really never 
dry? 

They Stick to the Shoe 
Soles at Every Step 

The floors thus painted can- 
not be scrubbed to look really 
clean, but every scrubbing 
wears off some paint. 

There's another kind that you 
will be proud of 

JAMIESON'S 

Floor Enamels 

are the best selling lines in the 
trade. They have none of the 
drawbacks of the ordinary 
paints. They dry quickly and 
leave a finish that cannot be 
rubbed off by frequent scrub- 
bings. Besides, being of a 
smooth surface, they are very 
easily cleaned with a mop. 
They save labor and annoyance 
from the moment they are put 
on the floor, and they never 
STICK. 



R. G.JAM1ES0N& CO. 

LIMITED 

Sole Manufacturers MONTREAL 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

•• HIGHGRADE FURNITURE aDd" HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 




IMPROVED CARPENTER S 
TOOLS 



Sold by all Hardware 
Dealers 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO 



NEW BRITAIN , Conn., U.S.A. 




GLAZERS' DIAMONDS OF PROVED WORTH 

Having a Century's Reputation for Reliability. 
MADE BY 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Elmg. 

CANADIAN AGENT 

GODFREY S. PELTON, 201 Coristine Building, Montreal 

The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

R. E. THORNE & CO. 

The only bronze powder works under the British flag. 
High Grade bronze powders and bronze liquids. 
Can fill all orders at short notice. 

MONTREAL - TORONTO 

WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD. NO ORDER TOO LARGE 



Are you interested in any of the lines that are advertised ? 
A Post Card will bring you price list and full information. 
Don't forget to mention Hardware and Metal. 



47 



HARDWARE mND METAL 




An Important Announce- 
ment regarding "An= 
chor" and "English" 
Liquid House Paints. 



POK some time we have been 
supplying the trade with 
Paints put up under both brands, 
but for various reasons we find 
it advisable to sell hereafter only 
"ENGLISH" LiaUID HOUSE 
PAINTS. The two brands were 
identical in quality, the only 
White Lead used in their manu- 
facture being Brandram's B. B. 
Genuine White Lead, the world's 
standard for close on to two cen- 
turies. So when we sell you 
"ENGLISH" LIQUID HOUSE 
PAINTS in place of "AN- 
CHOR," you will know that 
you are getting the same Paints 
as you ordered under " AN- 
CHOR,'' and we would ask you 
to get into the way of specifying 
"ENGLISH" in your orders in 
place of ".ANCHOR." We 
would also ask you to tell your 
cnstomers that " ANCHOR " 
Liquid House Paints are now 
called "ENGLISH," and so 
assist us to familiarize consumers 
with the name "ENGLISH" as 
the name of the leading brand 
of LIQUID HOUSE PAINTS. 

We maintain the "ANCHOR" 
trade mark on all our other 
Specialties. 



BRANDRAM- 
HENDERSON 



LIMITED' 



Halifax, St. JoHn, 
Montreal, Winnipeg, 

MARSHALL WELLS CO., Winnipeg 
Sole Distributors for Western Canada 



Paint and Oil Markets 



MONTREAL. 

urtli, at Huu>« u>.K ami Metal, 
332 McOiU8treet, 

Montreal. Juuimry 18. 1907 

The placing ol orders for Spring ship- 
ment, alluded to last week, is assuming 

such proportions as to indicate an ex- 
tremely brisk trade when the season 
actually opens. Manufacturers expect 
that from now on their mills will he 
kept busy. 

Prices remain unchanged, and the only 
special feature is the very firm position 
of turpentine. 

LINSEED OIL— We still quote : Raw, 

1 to 1 barrels, 55c; 5 to ( J barrels, 54c; 
boiled, 1 to 1 barrels, 5cc; 5 to 9 bar- 
rels, 57c. 

TURPENTINE— (In barrels)— The re- 
cent advance still holds, with a very 
linn market. Small quantities remain 
the same. We quote , Single barrel, 98c. 
per gal ; two barrels or over, 
97c. per gal.; for smaller quantities than 
barrels, 5c. extra per gal. is charged 
Standard gallon is 8.40 lbs., f.o.b. point 
of shipment, net 30 days. 

GROUND WHITE LEAD— Still main- 
tains its advance : Best brands, Gov- 
ernment Standard, $7.25 to 
$7.50; No. 1, $6.90 to $7.15; No. 2. $6.55 
to $6.90; No. 3, $6.30 to $6.55, all f.o.b., 
.Montreal. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— We still quote as 
follows : V.M. Red Seal, 7-fcc. to 8c; 
Red Seal, 7c to 8c ; French V.M., 6c to 
7c ; Lehigh, 5c to 6c 

WHITE ZINC— (Ground in oil) Prices 
remain firm at their recent advance. We 
quote : Pure, Hie. to 9^c ; No. 
1, 7c to 8c; No. 2, 5|c. to 6|c. 

PUTTY.— Our prices are : Pure 
linseed oil, $1.75 to $1.85 ; bulk in bar- 
rels, $1.50; in 25-lb. irons, $1.80 ; in 
tins, $1.90 ; bladder putty in barrels, 
$1.75. 

ORANGE MINERAL— Prices are as 

follows : Casks, 8c; 100 lb. kegs, 8£c 
RED LEAD— The following quotations 
are firm: Genuine red lead in casks, 
$6.00 ; in 100-lb. kegs, $6.25 ; in 
less quantities .at the rate of $7 per 100 
lbs. ; No. 1 red lead, casks, $5.75 ; kegs 
$6, and smaller Quantities, $6.75. 

PARIS GREEN — The following 
prices still hold good : In bar- 
rels, about 600 pounds, 23£c 
per lb.; in arsenic kegs, 250 lbs., 
234c; in 50 lb. drums, 24c; in 25 lb. 
drums, 244c; in 1 lb. packets, 100 lbs. 
in case, 25c; in 1 lb packets, 50 lbs in 
case, 25ic; in 4 lb. packets, 100 lbs in 
ease, 27c; in I lb. tins, 26c f.o.b. 
Montreal. Term three months net or 

2 per cent. 30 days. 

SHELLAC— We quote: Bleached, 
in bars or ground, 4Gc. per lb., 
f.o.b. Eastern Canadian points ; 
bone dry, 57c. per lb., f'.o-b. Eastern 
Canadian points; T. N. orange, etc., 
[8c per Ih. f.o.b. New York. 

SHELLAC VARNISH— Prices re- 
main : Pure white, $2.90 to $2.95 ; 

4* 



pure orange, $2.70 to $2.75 ; No. 1 
orange, $2.50 to $2.55. 

.MIXED PAINTS— Prices range frorj 
$1.20 to $1.50 per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL— Our prices are : Firsts 
in cases, &.}c; in barrels, 8c; seconds in 
cases, 8c; in barrels, 7ic 

BEN2HNE— In bbls.)— We still quote: 
20 cents per gallon. 

GASOLINE— (In bbls.)— Our price is 
2^'A cents per gallon. 

PETROLEUM- (In barrels) Our 

prices are : American prime white 
coal, 15jc. per gallon. American wat- 
er, 17c per gallon; Pratt's Astral, 19*0, 
per gallon. 

WINDOW GLASS-Our prices are: 
First break, 50 feet, $1.85; second 
break, 50 feet, $1.95 ; first break, 
100 feet, $3.20; second break, 
100 feet, $3.40; third break, 100 feet 
$3.95; fourth break, 100 feet, $4.15 ; 
fifth break, 100 feet, $4.40; sixth break', 
100 feet, $4.95. Diamond Star : First 
break, 50 feet, $2.30 ; second break, 50 
feet, $2.50 ; first break, 100 feet, $4.40 ; 
second break, $4.80 ; third break, 100 
feet, $5.75 ; fourth break, 100 feet, 
$6.50 ; fifth break, 100 feet, $7.50 ; sixth 
break, 100 feet, $7.50 ; seventh break, 
100 feet, $8 ; eighth break, 100 feet, $9. 
Double Diamond : First break, 50 feet, 
$3.45 ; second break, 50 feet, $3.75 ; 
first break, 100 feet, $6.75 ; second 
break, 100 feet, $7.25 ; third break, 100 
feet, $8.75 ; fourth break, 100 feet, $10; 
fifth break, 100 feet, $11.50 ; sixth 
break, 100 feet, $12.50 ; seventh break, 
100 feet, $14 ; eighth break, 100 feet, 
$16.50 ; ninth break, 100 feet, $18 ; tenth 
break, 100 feet, $20 ; eleventh break, 
100 feet, $24 ; twelfth break, 100 feet, 
$28.50. Discount on Diamond Star, 20 
per cent.; on Double Diamond, 40 per 
cent. 



TORONTO. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 18, 1907. 

1'aint manufacturers report a very 
Inislc season at present, as all hardware 
merchants are ordering before the 
spring advances. 

Paris preen is experiencing a great 
trade as the majority of orders are 
taken for English green which will ar- 
rive about the first of May. While 
the new shipping terms will not en- 
courage the early buying of Canadian 
green, merchants will generally see the 
advantage of ordering early in view of 
the shortage expected. 

The Carter White Lead Company, of 
Montreal, have closed down their cor- 
roding mill, partly owing to being un- 
able to procure enough raw material, 
and pal tly to internal t roubles, 

Turpentine has again advanced ow- 
ing to the greal scarcity in Savannah. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Does your paint trade pay? 



Tt pays many other 
IlK'Jl. Tt ou^lit to 
pa\ you. There's 
paint used in your 
town — lots of it. 
Are yon getting your 
share ? Yon should j 

Take a look at 

Ramsay's 
Paints 



for 1907. Ask for color cards, prices, con- 
ditions. 

Get a paint that pays and the paint will 
pay YOU. 

Want to see our traveller ? We'll 
send him if you say so. 

A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 




Kit. 184:2 



MONTREAL 



PAINT MAKER8 



Just try some ordinary green paint 
on a panel of wood, see how hard it 
works, — don't cover, lacks body. Then 
try on another panel 

LUCAS IMPERIAL 
FRENCH GREEN 



notice how easy it spreads, how well it 
covers, — that's body. Makes the cost 
less for this reason alone, and stays 
fresh and brilliant. It preserves the 
wood, keeps the weather out and the 
color in. It is the ONE Green that is 
free from arsenic or verdigris. 



BEWARE OF IMITATIONS 



JOHN LUCAS & CO. 



NEW YORK, 



PHILADELPHIA, 



CHICACO 




A Paint Business 

built upon quality is enduring and permanent. 
Success won with an inferior and cheap paint 
will not stand the heat of competition— wilts 
away like a chunk of ice in a hot desert. 

There's Profit and Prestige to be gained 
in selling 

The Martin -Sen our Paint 

100 per cent pure 



You get that all-satisfying feeling that your 
word is respected and relied upon, — a dyed-in- 
the-wool reputation of handling best quality 
goods. 

Worth Commands Recognition 

The Martin-Senour 100 per cent PURE 
Paint exclusive agency, with our trade winning 
methods of advertising direct to consumers, is 
an income maker. 

We would like you to investigate our prop- 
osition. Write us. 



The 



Martin-Senour Co., 



Ltd. 



"Pioneers of Pure Paints" 

142-144 Inspector St., - Montreal 

2514-2520 Quarry Street and Archer Avenue 
Chicago 

(Established 1876) 

The Winnipeg Paini & Glass Co. The Maritime Paint & Varnish Co. 
Winnipeg Halifax, N.S. 



49 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 




From the 
Montreal 
Daily Star, 
January 3, 1907 

PAINT AND OIL MARKET. 

CANADIAN PARIS 
GREEN HAS TAKEN 
QUITE AN UPWARD 
MOVEMENT, BEING 
QUOTED AT 25c. IN 
POUND PAPERS, BRING- 
ING IT TO THE SAME 
LEVEL AS THE IM- 
PORTED ARTICLE. 
MANY CLAIM THE "CAN- 
ADIAN PARIS GREEN IS 
BETTER THAN ANY- 
THING ON THE MAR- 
KET." • 

To prevent disappoint- 
ment please look for the 

Canada Paint 
Company's 



name upon each pack- 




We iiic now quoting $1.02 for single 

barrels and $1.07 in small quantities. 

Raw ami boiled oil remain at lasl 
week's quotations. 

WHITE LEAD Ex Toronto pure 
white, $7.40; No. l. $6.65; X... •_>. $6.25; 
No. 3, $5.90; No. 4. $5.65 in packages 
of 25 pounds and upwards; L-2c per 
pound extra will be charged for 12 "l-'i 
pound packages; genuine dry white 
lead in casks, $7.00. 

RED LEAD— ^Genuine in casks of 500 
lbs., $6.00; ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., 
$6.50; No. 1 in casks of 500 lbs., $5.75; 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $6.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC- In casks, 7 
l-2c.; in 100 lbs., 8c, No. 1, in casks 

6 l-2c, in 100 lbs., 7c. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— In 25- 
lh. irons, 8c.; in 12 1-2 lbs., 8 l-2c. 

SHINGLE STAIN — In 5-gallon lots, 
75c. to 80c. per gallon. 

PARIS WHITE— 90c. in barrels to 
$1.25 per 100 lbs. 

WHITING— 60c. per 100 lbs. in bar- 
rels; Gilders' bolted whiting, 90c. in 
barrels, $1.15 in smaller quantities. 

SHELLAC VARNISH— Pure orange 
in barrels, $2.70; white, $2.82 1-2 per 
barrel; No. 1 (orange) $2.50; gum sbel- 
lac, bone dry, 63c, Toronto. T. N. 
(orange) 51c net Toronto. 

LINSEED OIL — We continue to 

quote: Raw. 1 to 3 barrels, 59e; 4 to 

7 barrels, 57c; 8 and over, •>(><-, add 3c 
to this jtrice tor boiled oil. Toronto, 
Hamilton. London and Guelph net 30 

days. 

TURPENTINE— As predicted by us, 
turps have again advancd and we now 

quote: Single barrels, .+1.05; 2 to 4 bar- 
rels. $1.04, f.o.b. point of shipment, net 
30 days. Less than barrels, $1.07 per 
gallon. 

GLUES-French Medal, 12 l-2c. per 
pound; domestic shee , 10 l-2c. per lb. 

PUTTY— Ordinary, 800 casks, $1.50; 
100 drums, $1.75, barrels or bladders, 
$1.75; 100-lb. cases. $1.90;; 25-1 b. irons. 
$1.85; 25-lb. tins (4 to case) $1.90; 12 
i lb. tins (8 to case) $2.1<»: 

LIQUID PAINTS-Pure, $1.20 to 
$1.35 per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gal- 
lon. 

BARN PAINTS— Gals., 70c to 80c 

BRIDGE PAINTS— Gals., 75c to $1. 

CASTOR OIL— English, in cases, 9 
l-2c. to 10c. per lb., and lie. for single 
tins. 

PARIS GREEN— On Canadian green, 
the base price should be 25ic instead 

of 25c. English remains at for r 

quotations, 25; base f.o.b. Toronto. 

REFINED PETROLEUM — Dealers 
are stocking up heavily for the Winter. 
We still quote : Canadian prime white, 
14c ; water white, 16c ; American wa- 
*.er white, 16c to lfcc. ex warehouse. 

CRUDE PETROLEUM — We quote : 
Canadian, $1.32; Pennsylvania, $1.58; 
Ohio, 96c 

50 



MIXED PAINT ADVANCES. 

Recenl advances on mixed paints were 
[atgelj owing to the increased cosl of 

raw materials, tin cans, boxes and la- 
bor. Manufacturers hesitated individual- 
l\ to make a move that mighl meet 
with strpug disfavor on the pari oi their 
customers, but a few of the stronger 
manufacturers made the advance .111(1 
their example was followed by the oth- 
ers. In the majority of eases, custom- 
ers received the announcement more fav- 
orably than had been expected, and On- 
demand for brands of paint enjoying a 

good reputation was not lessened by a 
slight increase in price. In fact the ad- 
v. inrcs had been expected li\ the letail- 
er, as the high prices of raw material 
warranted the advance. 

That the logic of events is strongly 
in favor of the advance is sufficiently 
proved by the mere fact that it has been 
made by practically everv paint manu- 
facturer. It would be impossible to 
bring all the manufacturers together in- 
to a concerted movement to this ellect 
by mere urging. Not until each manu- 
facturer saw that the life of his busi- 
ness depended on getting a better price 
for his product, commensurate with its 
increased cost, was he willing to de- 
clare an advance. 



LEAVES PAINT FOR STOVES. 

Cordon Ritchie, who recently accepted 
a position with the Montreal branch of 
the McClary Manufacturing Company, 
was not head of the selling staff of the 
Sherwin-Williams Company at Montreal, 
as reported. For the past six years he 
held various positions on the S.-W. of- 
fice staff, but it was an injustice to 
both Mr. Ritchie and his former em- 
ployers to connect his name with On- 
position he was said to have resigned. 
Mr, Ritchie has many friends in the 
paint trade who wish him every success 
in the stove end of the business. 



LATEST CANADIAN PATENTS. 

The following up-to-date list of Can- 
adian patents is reported to us by 
Egertoh R. Case, solicitor of patents, 
and expert in patent causes, Temple 
Building, Toronto: — Isaac Peabody, St. 
Mary's, N.B., conveyois; J. •). Holmes, 
Chatham, Out., refrigerating machines; 
Jas. F. Latimer, Toronto, apparatus 
for separating and refining graphite; 
Geo. A. Bennett, Winnipeg, cushions 
for bicycles; Thos. M. Morgan, Longue 
Point, Que., apparatus; for burning 
cement; Thos. Wilson, Ottawa, adjust- 
able roofs; Wm. J. Watson, Ladysmith, 
B.C., smelting furnaces; Hiram W. 
Bixon, Victoria Mines, Out., blast 
furnaces; Goldsmith English, Windsor, 
Ont., the construction of electrical an- 
nunciators; Peter Stoddart, Copper 
Cliff, tapping jackets for blasl furnace 
settling wells or for hearths; Fred. .1. 

Gilmore, Montreal, apparatus for build- 
ing submerged concrete works from 
above the surface of the water; A 1 hi it 
Belair, Ahuntsic, Que., burial caskets; 
Win. C. Gurney, Toronto, gas ranges 
and stoves; Robt. N. Gundy. Guelph, 
cooking stoves and ranges. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



BERRY BROTHERS' VARNISHES 



are one grand story of success 

BECAUSE THEY ARE THE BEST 

They are the safest goods to handle, 
and the most reliable goods to use. 

Write for Catalogue, Information and Prices. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 



NEW YORK 
BOSTON 
PHILADELPHIA 
BALTIMORE 



Varnish Manufacturers 

DETROIT 

Canadian Factory— WALKERVILLE ONT. 



CHICAGO 
CINCINNATI 
ST. LOUIS 
SAN FRANCISCO 




Insist on 



r o o fs 



We're not making our paint story quite sO strong as some of our competitors — 
because we don't need to. True, it's pretty widely known that every claim we 
make we stand ready to prove in the most effective manner. We state that 



ARK BRAND 



is just as good as good paint can be. It is enduring. There is lasting life 

and lustre in every drop and hundreds of dealers say so right over their 
signatures. 

Richards Landing, December 1'2th, 1906. 
The Benjamin Moore Co., Limited, Toronto, Ont. : 

Gentlemen,— At the close of another season's paint trade, I wish to express my satisfaction in handling Ark Brand I'aint. Customers ask for it— say they 
want no other. I have now handled it for 7 or 8 years. Your Muresco is the best wall' finish I have ever handled. It works so easily that anyone can apply It, and 
in every case it gives splendid results. Yours trul\ , 

JAMES R. MOORE. 

ARK BRAND has built up more paying trades than any 
other paint on the Canadian market to-day. 

Of course you handle 

MURESCO WALL FINISH 

There may be a better wall finish on the market some day. 
Mure*CO is the best to-day. 

Manufactured by 

THE BENJAMIN MOORE CO.. LIMITED 

FORMERLY THE FRANCIS FROST CO., LIMITED 

New York TORONTO, CANADA Chicago 

51 




PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



What's in a Name 

Without Quality to Back it Up 7 

" STERLING " PURE PREPARED PAINT is not particularly unlike many 
other mixed paints in the liquid form, or when first applied. -^_ 

BUT THE DIFFERENCE becomes more and more apparent as the months 
and years roll by, for " Sterling " Paint will present a smooth, bright, glossy ap- 
pearance long after other paints have faded, peeled and disappeared. IT LASTS. 
" Sterling" Paint is always uniform, has more body, covers more surface and is 
more durable than any other paint made in Canada. 
We are determined that, cost what it may, 

"STERLING" PURE PREPARED PAINT 

shall always be known as the BEST PAINT 




"STERLING" IN NAME 



"STERLING" IN QUALITY 



Manufactured by 



CANADIAN OIL COMPANY 

TORONTO L,M,TED 

MONTREAL ST. JOHN OTTAWA WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



THE HOUSEKEEPER'S DREAM. 

I dreamt that I dwelt in Alabastined halls, 
Alabastined ceilings, Alabastined walls, 
Where the fairies love to congregate and meet 
The air is so etherial, pure and sweet. 

Cupids and fairies will visit you at night 

In rooms, Alabastined beautiful and bright, 

From kalsomines or wall papers tainted with decay 

High on upward wing they rise and flee away. 

ALABASTINE is the only Wall Coating, which is extensively and persistently advertised to the general 
public, and is what the people call for when they want anything in the line. 

THIS IS NO DREAM 

Our publicity campaign for 1907, as planned, is sure to more than double the already large trade for 
ALABASTINE. 

Our new illustrated catalogue, " HOMES, HEATHFUL AND BEAUTIFUL" is the sensation of 
the season in the advertising line. 

Get ready to supply the large and growing demand for ALABASTINE by ordering a full assortment, 
either direct or through your nearest jobber, and DO IT NOW. 

The ALABASTINE CO., Limited, PARIS, Ont. 



62 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



BLANCHITE 



BLANCHITE Paints and Enamels are exclusively used on the magnificent 
new building of 

"THE AUTOMOBILE CLUB OF AHERICA" 

a club of millionaires with one of the most elaborate club houses in the U. S. 

This is a fireproof concrete building. After exhaustive tests, the architect 
found BLANCHITE the only paint product that could safely be applied on the 
concrete walls and ceilings and not be affected by actions of cement and its 
components. All other paints showed discoloration. 

Moreover, no other paint would stand the action of gasoline and garage 
oils, or endure washing to remove the effects of oils and grease. 

This is one of the latest victories for BLANCHITE. 



WRITE FOR INFORMATION 



THE BLANCHITE PROCESS PAINT CO., Limited 



785 King Street West, TORONTO, CANADA 



A CARLOAD Or STEEL 

Just think of it 




A full carload of steel just arrived, to be 

manufactured into the celebrated 

"Best" Mops. 



Demonstrating the enormous sale on this favorite article 



Order early to ensure 
prompt shipment 



Ask your 

Jobber 
for them 



Made by- 



The Gumming Mfg. Co., Ltd 



WINNIPEG : 608 Ashdown Bldg. 



63 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITT1NQ 



THE STANDARD IDEAL SANITARY CO., LIMITED 







We manufacture a complete line of 

Range-Closets, Range-Urinals, 

Lavatories 

and Sanitary Fixtures 

Suitable for Public Institutions 



Plate E. 404.— For Public Institutions, Schools, Factories, 
Asylums, &c. 



The reputation of our goods is unequalled. 

Toronto: 50 Colborne Street Montreal: 128 Craig Street West 

Winnipeg : 24 Telfer Building 

HOME OFFICE and FACTORIES : PORT HOPE, ONT. 




MOODY'S : 

SLICK 

Canadian 




We handle 

Slick Klenzer 

The finest article for cleaning enamel- 
ware, leaving it bright and shining. 
Try a sample dozen packages for a 
dollar. 



A- 



w± 



V 



U.MJ 



REGIS! f-REDl 



S 



J.M.T. Cushion 
Bibbs, Bath Cocks, Basin Cocks 



Vi 







r^^^=~i^r% 




JM.T. IS^p^^P 


J.M.T. 


Cushion work is 




proving the most ,jfB ■ . 


Cushion work is 


satisfactory under fa ■ T 
any and all condi- 


made in all the 


standard styles of 


tions. 


compression 


Neat and attrac- <^t^ ^ 


bibbs. 


tive in design. 




Try the J.M.T. 


Themostdur- 




Cushion Double 


able on the mar- 






Bath Cock and 


WW 


ket. 


1 




^^ Basin Cock. 


They last for 


Wh 




^k\ They're on the 


years without re- ^ -~^—~ ^ 


\\\ durability list. 


newing washers. 





ml 

The James Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., 



PLUMBERS' SUPPLIES AND SPECIALTIES 



93-95 Adelaide St. West, 

6± 



Limited 

TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Plumbing and Steamfitting 



THE PLUMBING OF A COTTAGE 

By J. A. F. Carclitt In the National Builder, Chicago 
. Article XIV. 



Refrigerator Wastes. 

In the modern cottages the refrigera 

tor waste is supplanting the old style 
drip pan as a means of carrying away 
the drippings from the ice. This im- 
provement is not only a great conveni- 
ence to the housekeeper, but is also a 
more sanitary arrangement as the wa- 
ter which drips from the ice chamber is 
more or less slimv and unhealthy. 

Under the refrigerator a safe, about 
fifteen inches square, is constructed by 
nailing hardwood beveled strips to the 
floor so as to form a pan and lining the 
pan with six-pound sheet lead turned 
over and tacked to the wood strips in 
the manner shown in Fig. 59. An out- 



ed so as to prevent any foreign sub- 
stance from entering the pipe, and the 
space immediately about the outlet is 
countersunk. Sheet copper is sometimes 
used instead of sheet, lead for the lining. 
The piping should discharge over a 
sink in the cellar and should never be 
directly connected to the drainage sys- 
tem. There are times when the refriger- 
ator is temporarily out of use and con- 
sequently there is not enough water to 
maintain the seal in the trap, so Uiat if 
the waste was connected to the diain- 
age system the foul air and gases would 
enter the house through the refrigerator 
waste. Discharging the pipe over a sink 
does away with this evil. 



BMBBBBgBBSfc mBEMHBB BBB 



R S-F-EIGFKATi 



rcfe 






F-LOOJ? BEAMS. 



6* 



nr5 a. 



OFT- SET. 




TT?AP E> 



CHECK. VALVE". 



Y2 !: ft / SIHK. 



m 






Fig. 58 



let is left in the centre of the safe for 
the connection of the waste pipe. Over 
the outlet a removable strainer is plac- 



The sink should be supplied with wa- 
in and should he properly connected up 
to the drainage system, and the trap on 

55 



the sink wasle should he hack vented. 
The sink should always be placed in a 
luc.it ion where it will be used at fre- 
quent intervals so that the seal of the 
sink trap will be properly maintained 
The piping is usuallj of galvanized 
wrought iron one and one-quarter inches 

in diameter, with galvanized wrought, 
iron recessed and threaded drainage fit- 
tings. 
All horizontal offsets should be made 




Fig. 59. 

accessible by means of a cleanout as at 
"A," Fig. 58. 

Near the outlet of the pipe a light 
swing check valve should be provided to 
prevent the cellar air from entering the 
rooms above through the waste pipe. No 
trap is required on the refrigerator 
waste when installed in this manner, 
but frequently the check valve is omit- 
ted and a trap formed by bending the 
pipe as at "B." This trap serves the 
same purpose as the check valve, but is 
not so good for the reason that the seal 
is liable to be broken by evaporation 
and the trap forms an inaccessible poc- 
ket for obstructions which may enter 
the pipe. 

The connection between the safe and 
the iron piping is usually made with a 
short piece of lead pipe, soldered to the 
safe lining and wiped or soldered to a 
brass ferrule or nipple screwed into the 
hub of the iron fitting. 



LUNKENHEIMER'S BIG CALEN- 
DAR. 

The Lunkenhcimer Company, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, who are represented in Can- 
ada by Clufl Bros., Toronto, have sup- 
plied their customers with a monster 
daily calendar which, besides telling at 
a glance the day of the year, constantly 
reminds buyers of the varied line of 
valves and engineering specialties manu- 
factured by them. Stcamfitters and en- 
gineers desiring one of the calendars 
should mention this paper when writing 
the firm at Cincinnati. 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



INTERESTING APPLICATION OF AN AIR WASHER 

The followii .ption o£ an air lei to thai of Hie air travel. Kadi of 

ilv installed j thes e uozzlee will atomize, claim 

's ,ii. ; ii- eTIJ Between lj and 2 pottndy Uf walHi 



in the i 5 Steel Company 

m Chicago hag bepn .supplied 
by the Huffalo Forge Company, whose 
used. 
"In the past the only objection to 
m of indirect heating and 
lation lias been found i<> the intro- 
■ >n of dust and soot and occasion- 
foul gases due to the proximity of 
the ventilation intake being necessarily 
near to the street level 01 a neighbor- 
ing chimney. This feature would be 
noticeably unpleasant in a drafting 
room because of\the deposit of dust 
which would o«cur on the drawings to 
the annoyance of the draftsmen. 



per minute as supplied by the pump. 
The wa'ti through the nozzle 

is atomized by centrifugal force ac- 
quired by its own circular path in lea> 
ing the nozzle exit. 

"The washing is completed and the 
tree moisture removed by drawing the 
air through what the writer will choose 
In call eliminator plates, a system of 
vertical baffle plates. The first part of 
each plate presents to the air merely 
a water covered surface to which the 
solid particles originally present in the 
aii- will cling ami be left by the air as 
it passes to the second or rear portion 



"The humidity control is through 
the agencj pi' a, £heuiostat, a heat in- 
dicating iiiMruiuentt. The amount of 
moisture which the air will absorb in 
Hie form of water vapor has been found 
alter careful lest to be controlled more 
by the temperature of the water exposed 
Up I he air, than through the air temper- 
ature. Therefore if the thermostat be 
set and calibrated by trial and it controls 
a steam jel playing into the water sup- 
plied to the Spr.ay nozzles, it can con- 
trol the spray water temperature and 
hence' the humidity which is kept at a 
constant percentage of the saturation 
point at all temperatures. 

"The washing chamber and elimina- 
tor plate, which are of galvanized iron, 
are housed in the same materials, stif- 
llv raced, riveted and soldered so as to 




Air Washer System in the Illinois Steel Company's Drafting Room 



"The general layout and scheme of 
distribution of the ventilation is care- 
fully shown on the accompanying 
drawing. The entering air passes into 
the tempering coils through a grating 
placed near the corner of the building. 
The tempering coils contain 1,000 feet 
of 1-inch pipe ami Berve in cold weather 
i'. raise the temperature of the air to 
70 or 80 degrees F., whence it proceeds 
directly to an air washer. 

"The washing chamber, in which we 
will include all the apparatus provided 
tor washing and afterward removing 
the free moisture, has a rated capacity 
of 10.000 cubic feet of air per minute 
and is 4 feet 10 inches wide, 4 feet 8 
inches high and 7 feet long. 

"The washing itself is accomplished 
by spraying the incoming air through 
70 specially designed nozzles, the di- 
rection of water projection being paral- 



of the plates which are provided with 
gutters running lengthwise to break the 
continuity of the water lilm and prevent 
it from being blown from the far side 
of the plates by the on-rushing air. The 
water removed from the air runs to a 
settling tank built beneath the elimina- 
tor in the concrete foundation and 
above which the eliminator plates are 
supported on 4-inch galvanized 1 
beams. Provision is made in the set- 
Iting tank for drawing off the "set- 
tlings" and then the clearer water is 
led to a well with which the suction of 
the small brass centrifugal pump belt 
driven fiom a 2 h.p. 440 volt A.C. motor, 
is connected and then this water, after 
straining, is supolied again to the noz- 
zles, The nozzles are readily taken 
1 bv removing the knurled cap with 
one's fingers to remove any scum thai 
may have been deposited there. 

56 



be water-tight. In the washer casing 
is placed a water-tight door and two 
plate glass windows to allow inspec- 
tion of its action while in operation. 
Connecting with this housing on the 
washer end is the inlet conduit and the 
other end connects with the heater 
coils. 

"After leaving (he heater coils which 
supply radiation from 1.500 feet of L- 
inch pipe, and passing through a 70- 
inch lower provided with a double set 
of curved blades, the air is forced 
through the system of ducts shown by 
the building plan to the various parts 
of the drafting room. The blower* is 

belt driven from a Westinghouse 5 h.p. 
I in volt 3 phase A.C. motor and makes 
47") revolutions per minute at a capa- 
city of 10.000 cubic feet of air per 

minute." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Plumbing Markets 



MONTREAL. 

Office of Hardware and Mctal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, January 17, 1907 

Business here remains excellent. 
There has never bega a winter ■when gen- 
eral conditions have been so good. This 
is due, no doubt, to the great amount 
of building going on at present. Here- 
before building operations are general- 
ly suspended with the arrival of Jack 
Frost, but this year from some cause 
oi» other, they have continued, and con- 
tractors are pushing things just as 
though the thermometer registered 80 
degrees in the shade. 

With this unexpected activity, job- 
bers are having a great deal of trouble 
and find it almost impossible to get de- 
liveries. 

Copper range boilers have taken a 
jump and the discount is now only 5 
per cent. 

Other prices remain the same. 

RANGE BOILERS— We now quote: 
Iron clad, 30 gallon, $5; 40 gallon, 
$0.50 net list. Copper, 30 gallon, $33; 
35 gallon, $38; 40 gallon, $43; 45 gal- 
Jon, $50; 50 gallon, $58; 60 gallon, 
.-fliS; 70 gallon, $80; 80 gallon, $95; 90 
gallon, $115; 100 gallon, $150 net. 

LEAD PIPE— Remains firm. We 
still quote 5 per cent. discount 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, St. John, 
N.B., Halifax : f.o.b., London, 15c per 
hundred lbs extra; f.o.b. Hamilton, 10c 
per hundred lbs. extra. 

IKON PIPE FITTINGS We still 

quote: Discounts on nipples, \ inch 
to 3 inch, 75 per cent., 3 l / 2 inch to 2 
inch, 55 per cent. 

IRON PIPE— Supplies still short' 
with last week's advance holding firm. 
We quote: Standard pipe in lots of 
100 feet, regular lengths, \ inch, $5.50; 
\ inch. $5.50; \ inch, $8.50; f 
inch, 11.50 ; 1 inch, $16.50 ; 1 1-4 
inches, $22.50 ; 1 1-2 inches, $27.00 ; 
2 inches, $36.50, discounts on 
black pipe, i inch, 59 per* cent. ; f 
in. 59 per cent.; i in. 68; | to 2, 70. 
Discounts on galvanized pipe : i 
inch, 44 per cent.; f inch, 44 per cent.; 
i inch, 58 per cent.; ? to 2 inch, 60 
per cent. Extra heavy pipe of 
100 feet lots are quoted as fol- 
lows: 1-2 inch, $12; 3-4 inch, $15; 1 
inch. $22: 1 1-4 inches. $30; 1 1-2 inches. 
$36; 2 inches, $50. The discounts on 
black pipe, i inch, 74 per cent.; | inch, 
69 per cent.; I inch to 2 inches, 68 per 
cent. Galvanized, J- inch, 59 per cent.; 
£ inch, 69 per cent.; % to 2 inches 58 per 
cent. 

SOIL PD?E AND FITTINGS— Our 
prices remain as follows: Standard 
soil pipe, 50 per cent. oft list. 
Standard fittings, 50 and 10 per cent, off 



list; medium and extra heavy soil pipe, 
60 per cent. off. Fittings, 60 per cent, 
off. 

SOLI) Kit— We quote: Bar solder, 
half ami half, guaranteed, 25c; No. 2, 
wiping solder, 22c. 

SOLDER — Prices remain the same : 
Bar solder, half-and-half, guaranteed 
25c.; No. 2 wiping solder, 22c. 

ENAMKLWAHK — Recent advance 
on Canadian ware still holds. We 
quote: Canadian baths. see Jan. 
3, 1907 list. Lavatories, dis- 

counts, 1st quality, 30 per cent.; spec- 
ial, 30 and 10 per cent. Sinks, 18 x 30 
inch, flat rim, 1st quality, $2.60, 
special. $2.45. 

TORONTO. 

Office of Hardware /.nd Metal, 
10 Front Street East. 

Toronto, January 18, 190 

Advances have taken place this week 
on both galvanized iron and copper 
range boilers, the advance on the first 
mentioned amounting to 25 cents on 
each boiler, 30-gallon Standard being 
now quoted at $5, and extra heavy at 
$7.75. On copper range boilers a new 
list has been issued as a result of the 
many sharp advances which have taken 
place in the last few months in the cop- 
per market. The old lists quoted $25, 
$29, and $33 on 30, 35 and 40-gallon 
boilers, while the new figures are $33, 
$38 and $43 on the same sizes. On the 
old quotations, the net list was quoted, 
while now special discounts are given 
to cover the difference in the advance on 
the list over the real advance in the 
cost of manufacturing raw material. 

Other changes this week include the 
advance on J.M.T. globe, angle and 
check valves from 50 to 45 per cent.; 
the jump in cast iron fittings from (>2A 
to 60 per cent., and an advance on 
American enamel ware sufficient to cover 
the recent advance in duty. It is also 
understood that an advance of $1 per 
tub is to be made on American I -at lis. 
In addition to these changes, we have 
revised our quotation on iron pipe in 
sizes from 2i inches upward. 

While business is necessarily slow at 
this season, the volume of business that 
is being done is very satisfactory, both 
plumbing and heating contractors keep- 
ing most of their men at work on jobs 
which are being rushed to completion 
during the cold weather. 

LEAD PIPE — The discount on lead 
pipe continues at 5 per cent, off the list 
price of 7c. per pound. Lead waste, 8c. 
per pound with 5 off. Caulking lead 
5 ">-4c. to 6c. per pound. Traps and 
bends, 40 per cent., discount. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS — Re- 
cent advances are held to firmly 
with demand seasonable. Medium 
and extra heavy pipe and fit- 

57 



tings, 60 pel cent. ; light pipe 50 per 

cent.; light In I and 10 per cent.; 

7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 6 per cent. 

IRON rii'K.-U. are 
week's figures on huge sizes. One inch 
black pipe is quoted a1 54 ')■">, and one 
inch galvanized a1 (8,60 Full list in 

curi cnl market quotations: 

IKON PIPE FITTINGS— Cast Iron lu- 
tings show several ftdvi I iron el- 
bows, lees, (losses, etc., 60 pel cent , 
cast iron plugs and bushings, 60 pel 
cent,, flange unions, 60 pei cent., nip- 
ples, III) and L0 pel cent.; nun cocks, 55 
and 5 per cent.; Canadian malleable, 30 
per cent.; malleable unions, 55 and 5 pet 
cent.; malleable bushings, 55 per cent.; 
cast iron ceiling plates, j'Uin 65 per 
cent.; cast iron floor, 70 per cent.; hook 
plates, 60 per cent.; expansion plates, 
65 per cent.; headers, 60 per cent, hang- 
ers, 65 per cent.; standard list. 

RANGE BOILERS— An advance of 25 
cents has been made on all sizes of gal- 
vanized iron and we now quote; Gal- 
vanized iron, 30 gallon, standard, $5 ; 
extra heavy, $7.75; 35 gallon, standard, 
$6 ; extra heavy, $8.75 ; 40 gallon, 
standard, $7 ; 40 gallon, extra heavy, 
$9.75, net list. Copper range boilers- 
New lists quote : 30 gallon, $33 ; 35 gal- 
lon, $38 ; 40 gallon, $43. Discounts up 
to 15 per cent. 

RADIATORS— Prices are very stiff at; 
Hct water, 47^ per cent.; steam, 50 per 
cent.; wall radiators, 45 per cent.; 
specials, 45 per cent. Hot water boil- 
ers are unchanged. 

SOLDER — Quotations remain firm 
as follows: Bar solder, half-and- 
half, guaranteed, 27c; wiping, 23c. 

ENAMELWARE— New lists on enam- 
eled baths issued by the Standard Ideal 
Company on Jan. 3, show a 10 per cent, 
advance. Lavatories, first quality, 20 
and 5 to 20 and 10 off ; special, 20 and 
10 to 30 and 2£ per cent, discount. Kit- 
chen sinks, plate 300, firsts 60 and 10 
off ; specials, 65 and 5 per cent. 
Urinals and range closets, 15 off. Fit- 
tings extra. 

' A NEW EXHAUST HEAD. 

In modern engineering the removal of 
water and grease from the waste steam 
of the power plant is considered quite 
essential to good operation. For this 
purpose exhaust heads are used, and the 
new head just put on the market by the 
Canadian Buffalo Forge Co. is the re- 
sult of the applied experience of almost 
one-third of a century in building power 
plant equipment. This head depends for 
its operation on the excessive inertia of 
the water or grease over that of steam 
vapor, water weighing approximately 
seventeen hundred times as much as the 
vapor, volume for volume. 

Exhaust steam, rising into the head, 
strikes the inverted cone deflector, and 
the water and grease, by the change of 
direction, are thrown to the outer shell, 
where they find their way to the drip 
pipe. On account of its small weight 
per cubic foot the steam readily changes 
its direction of flow and finds its way 
through the outlet to the outside air. 
The shell of this apparatus is carefully 
constructed of heavy galvanized sheet 
iron, which is strongly riveted at the 
joints and soldered, the drip pipes from 
the deflector and to the outside air be- 
ing held in place by machine-threaded 
clamp nuts, so that there is no possi- 
bility of their working loose or breaking 
off. 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



THE NEW 



" SOLID-ADJUSTABLE" 
HAND STOCK AND DIES 




At prices that will warrant your 
inquiries. 

I. E. SHANTZ & CO. 



BERLIN, 



ONTARIO 



Selling Agents for Canada 




This is the Mark that 
Means Something 

It is the disiinciivc brand of genuine Armstrong 
Stocks and Die and Pipe Kilters' Tools. 

No "Armstrong pattern" or "just as good as 
Armstrong" have this stamp. Don't buy anything 
in this line that hasn't this brand as it is the mark 
of genuineness. 

THE ARMSTRONG MANUFACTURING CO. 

292 Knowlton Street, Bridgeport, Conn. 




TEST MY CLAIMS TO-DAY 

I want to know your ENAMELWARE WANTS so 
that I may prove to you how promptly shipments 
can be made. You'll find the Quality and Price 
just right. 



ORLANDO VICKERY 

178-180 Victoria Street TORONTO, CANADA 



"THE BEST ON EAR1TI" 

That's what practical men say about 

" Diamond Brand " Fittings 

and they should know. We guarantee that the finish is as smooth as can foe, the threads 
just right and the material first-class. 

OSHAWA STEAM & GAS FITTINGS CO., 



OSHAWA, CANADA 



LIMITED 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained from the principal Dealers in Glass, Hardware, and Painters' Supplies. 

Oontractors to H. M. Government and the principal English Sheet and Plate Glass 

Works 



" jT:JD ^% 



World's Best Cutlery 

^ V^ You make no mistake in specifying goods made by 

^ JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS, Limited 

WANTED *° when ordering cutlery. A reputation of over 200 years 

at stake, insures the quality of every article. 

Write for catalogues from Sole Canadian Agents 

JAMES HUTTON & COMPANY, MONTREAL 



A Certain Sense 

of Satisfaction 




goes with every MERRELL PORTABLE HAND 
MACHINE, PIPE THREADING and CUTTING 
MACHINE. We build them that way. 

For doiug all kinds of threading— under ALL con- 
ditions— labor troublo and faulty material included 
—where speed, durability and ease of control count 
fur something, our word to you is to investigate the 
MERRELL. 

Whether it be stationary or portable— hand or 
power driven-30 DAYS FREE TRIAL must 
prove conclusively that your ohoice should be the 
MERRELL. 

This Portable Hand Machine has encased gears, 
MERRELL standard quick opening and closing die- 
head, and the latest improved Cutting-ofI Knife. 

Let us tell you more about this machine— The 
Chasers, Vise and the large range of work covered. 



Catalogue for the asking. 
Quick shipments. 

CANADIAN FAIRBANKS GO. 

Sole Atenti for Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



THE 



| When You Buy f 
i Demand Proof 

5 Don't take any substitute for 

Glauber Brass goods. Make the 
salesman show you. Brass has 
3 gone up no less than fifteen per 

£ cent., and if you don't get proofs 

5 before you buy you take chances 

3 of getting something less than 

5 you pay for. 

WE GIVE YOU THE PROOF 
and 2 Cocks Free for any 
one sent you defective. 



Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., 

Expert Makers of Plumbers' Fine Brass Goods 
CLEVELAND, 0. 



Forwell Foundry Co. 

BERLIN, ONT. 

Manufacturers ot 

SOIL PIPE, FITTINGS, and CAST IRON SINKS 

Ask Jobber* for « F. F. CO." Brand 



58 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



THE LINE TO PUSH 



There are undoubtedly many people in your town 
whose business or home-demands Require an un- 
usual quantity of hot water. These Heaters are 
adapted for warming offices, conservatories and 
small dwellings, or supplying hot water for fac- 
tories, stables, barber shops, etc. 

It is a good time of year to push this line 
and keep the men busy during the dull season. 

ALL SIZES KEPT IN STOCK 



1^, 




CLUFF BROTHERS 



Selling Agents for 
WARDEN KING & SON, Limited, 



Lombard Street, TORONTO 




The Ever Ready 
Dry Battery 

FOR AUTOMOBILE and 



GASOLINE ENGINE USE 

Wrlto for Prices 

JOHN FORM AN 

248 and 250 Craig St. W., MONTREAL, - Que. 




HOTTEST ON EARTH 



The No. 8 Alcohol Blow Pipe produces nearly 
3000 F. Will do lead burning on storage 
batteries. Produces a needle blue flame pointed. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 
Jobbers sell at factory price, $9.75 net. 

THE TURNER BRASS WORKS 

53 MICHIGAN 8TREET, CHICACO, U.8.A. 



59 




Kerr's Standard and 
Jenkin Disc Radiator Valves 

are perfectly constructed, and of beauti- 
ful design. Like all " Kerr" specialties, 
strictly high-grade 

The KERR ENGINE CO.. 

Manufacturer* Limited 



WALKERVILLE 



ONTARIO 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



Horse Shoers' Foot Vise 
and Bolt Header 




A Practical Tool and a Time-saver for the Busy 
Blacksmith 

Manufactured by 

THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., 

LONDON, CANADA 



Limited 



The Long and the Short of It 



IT" MEANS 




THE ••LONG" 

is the time it wears. It stands the test of heat 
and frost, wind and rain, and give your cus- 
tomers manv years of solid satisfaction. 

THE ••SHORT" 

part is the time needed to put it on. A great 
deal of time — which means a great deal of 
money — is saved to the man who uses 

SHIELD BRAND 
READY ROOFING 



LOCKERBY <8b McCOMB 

t>3 SHANNON STREET 

MONTREAL 



Hardware and Plumber— 




We have pumps suit- 
able to any demand made 
upon you by most exact- 
ing customers. 

Our pumps will do 
anything that a pump 
can do, and we will be 
pleased to give the 
benefit of many years' 
experience to any one 
having pump troubles. 

McDougall Pumps are 
Standard Pumps, and 
with us it is quality first, 
last and always, while we 
ask just as little money 
as we can get along with. 

We have a Tew catalogues 
for distribution 



The R. McDougall Co., Limited 



CALT, 



CANADA 




ATKINS 



SILVER 
STEEL 



SAWS 



make merchandising easy. The Quality in them, backed by 
our enthusiastic publicity, has made them popular — we 
create the demand— you supply it. Easy to buy them — at 
your jobbers- -or nearest branch. 



E. C. A TKINS & CO., Inc. 

Home Office and Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Canadian Branch, 77 Adelaide St. E., TORONTO 



60 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 




N JECTORS 



EJECTORS 




"SAMSON " 

Screw Compression 

Grease Cup 



PJ11EHY 



MR. DEALER 

NOW IS THE TIME 

to order your stock of 

BRASS GOODS 

Don't forget to say to your jobber s 
SEND ME 

•'THE PENBERTHY KIND" 



WATER CAUCES 

CAUOE COCKS 




"SACHEM" 
Movable Bearing Oiler 



MANUFACTURED BY 



OILER CUPS 
CREASE CUPS 



PENBERTHY INJECTOR GO. 

LIMITED 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



AIR COCKS 



RADIATOR VENTS 




MUELLER FULLER BIBBS 

STANDARD PATTERN 




No rough or sharp seat edges to cut the 
ball. Deep seat with rounded edges 
and surfaoe curved to conform to the 
shape of the hall. Plain or for hose and 
all styles of pipe connection. 



w a n „ 



-gtCATCS- 



UNCONDITIONAL JlH^Mll GUARANTEE 
fetl.U.^ 



H. MUELLER MFG. CO. 



Decatur, III., U.S.A. 



New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 



Two World Leaders 




Fairbanks 
Brass Globe Valves 



Fairbanks 
Asbestos Packed Cocks 



The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Limited 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg Vancouver 




61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



nil IT" TAl/ IMP PHANPF^ ^ ou can ^ rar '- v on an - v ^ in( ^ °* Dns ' neSK campaign to a 
IJUI I HiVinU UnMllULO successful issue — unless you are ecrtnin about your base of 

Buppliee. When yon place an order with us you take out an insurance policy guaranteeing success. 

Quality trade-building quality is stamped through and through our 

READY ROOFING, TARRED FELTS, SHEATHING, WRAPPING AND BUILDING PAPERS 

These are our brands 

"BLACK DIAMOND" 

^w "JOLIETTE" 

^■v^fe* AND and 

^»W^ "CYCLONE" 

SHEATHING 
TARRED FELT 

QUALITY and PRICE always right 

ALEX. ricARTHUR & CO., Limited, Montreal 

F. J. C. COX, Winnipeg, Sole Agent for Northwest Provinces. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. IS, 1907. 
Tb»se pricea are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities anil 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. 1 he 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
»ny apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
It to make it perfectly accurate. 



METALS. 

ANTIMONY. 

Hallett s per lb. . . 27J 28 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS 

Plain tinned. \ 25 per cent, off list. 

Spun I 

BABBIT METAL. 
Canada Metal Company Imnerial genuine, 
60c. Imperial Tough. 6Gc; White Brass 50c.; 
Metallic. 35c ; Harris Heavy Pressure. 25r,; 
Hercules, 25c : Wnite Bronze. 15c.; Star 
Prietionless, He.; Alluminmd. 10c; No. 4, 
lie per lb. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, net list. 

Sheets, 12 to 14 in 27 

Tubing, hasc. per lb r -16 to 2 in ... . 33 
Tubing, , lo 3-inch, iron pipe size . 33 

1 to 3-inch, seamless 40 

Copper tubing, 5 ceLta extra. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lou 2*50 26 00 

Bars. 

Cut lengths, round, 4 to 2 in 32 00 

Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 .... 30 00 

Plain. 14 oz 3100 

Tinned copper sheet, base 33 00 

Planished base 37 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). »x6 ft., 25 

to 30 lb. each, per lb., base 30 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

8 to 10 gauge 2 60 2 60 

I2gauge 2 60 2 65 

14 " 2 60 2 60 

17 " 2 40 2 50 

15 " 2 40 2 55 

20 " 2 40 2 53 

22 " 2 40 2 70 

24 " 2 45 2 75 

26 " 2 55 2 85 

28 " 2 60 3 00 

CANADA PLATE8. 
Ordinary, 52 sheets 3 00 



All bright 

Galvanized Canada Plates,52 sheets 



4 01 
4 35 
•' 60 " 4 60 

Ordinary. Doni. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 
Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown 

16 to 20 gauge 3 60 
22 to 24 gauge 3 93 4 00 

26 "..4 3) 4 20 

28 " . . 4 45 4 SO 

Apollo. 

10] oz. (American gauge) 4 70 

28 gauge " 4 45 

26 " " 4 15 

24 " " 3 9 



Queen's 
Comet Head. Bell. 

16 to 20 gauge 3 60 3 75 .... 

22 to 24 gauge 3 75 3 90 .... 

26 " 4 30 4 45 .... 

28 " 4 45 4 60 4 45 

Less than case lota 10 to 25c. extra. 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto' 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 15 2 30 

Forged iron " 2 40 

Refined " " 2 55 2 70 

Horseshoe iron " 2 55 2 70 

Hoop steel, 11 to 3 in. base 2 80 

Sleigh shoe steel " .... 2 25 2 30 

Tire steel 2 40 2 50 

Best sheet cast steel 012 

B. K. Morton "Alpha high speed. 65 

" annealed 70 

"M" Self-hardening 50 

"J" quality, bestwarranted 18 

"I" " warranted 14 

"B.C" quality 09 

Jonas k Colver's tool steel. . . 10 20 

"Novo" 65 

" " annealed 65 

JowetttSonsB.P.L. tooUteel.... 10i 

INGOT TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $46 50 847 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright 
M.L.S., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

10,14 x 20 base 86 50 

IX. 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX, 14x20base 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

Id. 14x20base 6 50 

I X. 14x20 " .... 8 00 

IX X,14x20base 9 50 

Ravea and Vulture Grades— 

I C, 14 x 20 base 5 00 

IX " 6 00 

IXX " 7 00 

IXXX" 800 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double 

Coated, Tissued. Per box. 

I C, 14x20 base 5 75 

I X, 14x20 " 6 75 

IXX, 14x20" 7 75 

"Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 4 50 

IX. 14x20 ' 5 2b 

I XX, 14x20 " 6 00 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., 14x20 base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 50 

Charcoal Plates — Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 8 00 

IX., Terne Tin 9 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " \ ... 7 50 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 50 

" 26 " 9 "0 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 5 40 5 50 

Bar, " 5 75 6 00 

Sheets, 2J lb. «q. ft, by roll 06} 

Sheets. 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note. — Cut sheets }c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 5 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths^ net price, waste pipe 
8-ft lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-cwt. casks 8 00 8 25 

Part casks 8 25 8 50 

62 



ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 7 25 7 50 

Domestic- 7 00 7 25 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 

BRASS GOODS, VALVE", ETC 

Standard Compression work, dis half inch 50 
per cent., others 40 per cent. 

Cushion work, discount 40 per cent. 

Fuller work, 1-inch 60 per cant., others 50 p.c. 

Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 50 
per ce t. ; roundway, 45 per cent. 

J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 45 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valvea 
discount 52} per cent. 

Kerr standard globe?, angles and checks, 
special, 42 J per cent.; standard, 47 J p.c. 

Kerr Jenkins' disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, 45 per cent. 

Kerr steam radiator valves 60 p.c , and quick- 
opening hot-water radiator valveB, 60 p.c. 

Kerr brass, Weber's straightway valves, 
424 per cent. ; straightway valves, LB. B.M., 
60 percent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves, discount 50 per cent 

Standard Radiator Valves, 60 pe* cent. 

Patent Quick -Openintr Valves. 65 per cent. 

Jenkins' Bros. Globe Angle and Check Valves 
discount 32$ per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No 7 Fuller's " 2 25 

No. 4$, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold, per dci.., $16.20 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 50 percen'. 
'* " iron " " 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

BOILERS -COPPER RANGE. 

Coppe*, 30 gallon 33 00 

r ' 35 " 38 00 

" 40 " 43 00 

Discounts on new list. 

BOILERS — GALVANIZED IRON RANGE. 

Capacity Standard. Extra heavy 

30-gallons ... 5.00 7.75 

35 " .... 6.00 875 

4P " .... 7 00 9.75 

2 per cent., 30 days 

BATH TUBS. 

Steel clad copper lined, 15 per cent. 

181 IKON SINKS. 

16x24, SI: 18x30, *1 ; 18x36, ¥1.30. 

I SAMPLED CLOSETS AND URINALS 

Discount 15 per cent. 

enameled BATns. 
List i ' ued by the Standard Ideal Com- 
paoy Ian. 3, 1907. show< an advance of 10 per 
cent over previous quotations. 

ENAMELED LAVATORIES 

1st quality. Special. 

Plate E 100 to E 103 . .20 & 5 p.c. 20 & 10 p.c. 

" E 104 to E132....20&10p.c. 30 & 21 p ,c. 

ENAMELED ROLL RIM SINKS. 

1st quality. Special. 
Plate E 201, one piece. 15 & 2} p.c. 15&10p. c 

ENAMELLED KITCHEN SINKS. 

Plate E, flat iron 300, 60 & 10 p.c. 65 * 5 p.c. 





Galvanized 




3 08 




3 08 


\ " 


3 57 


1 M 


4 60 


1 " . 


6 60 


1} " . 


9 00 


11 " . 




2 " . 


14 40 


21 " . 


24 00 


3 " . 


31 50 


3» " . 


40 00 


4 " 


45 00 



Lead Pipe, 7c. per pound, 5 per cent. off. 
Lead waste, 8c. per pound, 5 per cent. off. 
Caulking lead, 6c. pef pound. 
Traps and bends, 40 per cent. 
IRON PIPE. 
Size (per 100 ft.) Black. 

} inch 2 25 

i " 2 25 

i " 2 72 

I " 3 45 

I " 4 95 

If " 6 75 

II " 8 10 

1 " 1C 80 

21 " 18 00 

3 " 23 50 

31 " 30 CO 

4 " 34 00 

2 per cent. 30 days. 

Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 30 per 

cent.; American discount 25 per cent. 
Oast Iron Fittings 60 ; : Standard bushings 60 
per cent.; headers, 60; flanged unions 60, 
malleable bushings 55 ; ninnies, up 'o 3 
in.. C5 a^d 10 per cent. ; up to 6 in., 65 
per cent.; malleable lipped unions, 55 and 
5 per cent. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and Ettra heavy pipe and fittings, 

up to 6 iui h, dncount 60 pe; cent. 
7 and 8-iii. pipe, discount. 40 and 5 per cent. 
Light pipe, 50 p c. ; fittings, 50 and 10 p.c. 

OAKUM. 
Plumbers ... per 10j lb 400 475 

RADIATORS, ETC. 

Hot water 47'/2 P-O. 

Steam 50 p.c. 

Wall Radiators and Special-i 45 p.c. 

STOVES, BOILERS, FURNACES, REC1ISTEKS. 

Discounts vary from 40 to 70 per cent, 
according to list. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

}-lb per lb 37 

Mb. or over " 34 

solder. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 25 27 
Wiping 22 2J 



PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 

Venetian red, 1-lb. tins, pure 08 

Chrome yellow .... 15 

Golden ochre " .... 08 

French " " .... 08 

Marine black " .... 041 

Chrome green 10 

French permanent green" — 13 
SignwriterB' black " 15 

(1LAZIKK POINTS. 

Discount, 5 per cent. 

GLUE. 

Domestic sheet 10 101 

French medal 12 14 

OILS AND TURPENTINE. 

W. H. & 0'« English ran oil, bbls. . . 63 
boiled " 66 

PABia ouiy, 

Bergers Canadian 

gflO-lti casks 231 :3{ 

250 lb. drums 234 23j 

100-lb. " ''24 0*4 

5Ub. " 54 21 

25-lb. " 244 24, 

lib. pkgs, HO in box 25 25 

lib. " 50 " V 251 

1-lb. tins, 10) " 2'. 26 

>/ 2 -lb. pkga 27 27 

2 p. c. 3 J days from date of shipment. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLAUSS BRAND DENTAL SNIPS 



Fully Warranted 

Manufactured from select stock. Steel Faced on Com- 
position Metal. We suggest dealers giving these a 
trial, as the same usually find an early purchaser. 

Write for Trade Discount 

The Clauss Shear Co,, 




Toronto, Ont 



l-RKPAKKD PAINTS. 

Pure, per sailor . in tin • 

Second qualities per gallon 

Barn(inbbls.) 60 

Sherwin-Willianispaintf ,} gal 

isal 

" gal 

Canada Faint Co.'s pure 

Standard Co.s " New Era." 

Bei.j Moorj Co.'a "Ark" Bd .... 

" British Navy deck 

Brandrarn- Henderson "Anchor" 

Ramsay s paints, Pure, per gal 

Thistle, " 
' Outside, bbls 55 

Martin-Senour's 100 p.c pure,} gal. 
ii •• •• •• j gal. 

" 1 gal. 
Jamieson's "Crown and Anchor" 

.Ijiiiih' son's floorenamel 

•' barn paints, bbls per gal 
Honour's Floor Paints . . . gal. 

.Sanderson Pearcy's pure 

Robert on'a pure pamta 

PUTTY. 

Bulk In bbla 

Bulk in less quantity 

bladders in bbla 

Bladders in Kegs, boxes or loose 

25-lb. tins 

12J lb. tins ••• 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb 
Bulk in 100-lb. irons 



1 20 
1 00 

90 

1 5J 
1 45 
1 40 
1 30 
1 3; 
1 2) 
1 50 
1 35 
1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 45 
1 4U 
1 35 
1 20 
1 50 

60 

1 20 
1 20 
1 2J 



1 50 
) 8U 
I 80 
1 95 

1 80 

2 05 
1 85 
1 80 

-ed. 
6 ou 
6 25 

5 75 

6 00 



DRY LKAD. w hil e 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwi 6 75 
Genuine, 100 lb. keg?, " 7 50 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwi 

No. 1, 100 ll>. kegs, per cwt 

SHELLAC. 

Sheila-, blea<hed, i.i bars or ground, 46c. per 
lb f o.b. Easte n Can ,dian foints 

Shellac,, bone dry, 57c. per lb . f.o.b.. Eastern 
Canadian Points; 63c, I oronto. 

Shellac, T N. orange, etc., 48c. l el. Toronto 

Per 100 1 s 
7 2'. 
6 90 
fi 55 
6 30 



WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. 
rure 

\o. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

Munro's Select Flake White. . 
Elephaut and DecoralorsTure 

Monarch 

Staodard Decorator's 

Essex tienuine 

Brandrarn s B. B. Genuine... . 

" Anchor," pure 

Ramsay h Pure Lead 

Ramsay's Exterior 

"Crown and Anchor," pure. . . 

Sanderson Pearcy's 

Robert-on'sC.P.lead 

W. H.& Cs matured pure English 

WINDOW GLASS. 



8 05 



7 r.0 
7 15 
6 90 

6 55 

7 cO 
7 2.i 
7 40 

7 15 
6 60 

8 25 
6 50 
6 40 
6 15 

6 50 

7 40 

7 20 

8 25 



Si e United 
I nches. 

Under 26 

26 to 40 

41 to 50 

51 to 60 

61 to 70 

71 to 80 

81 to 85 

86 to M0 • 

91 to 95 

9-. to 10H 

101 to 105 

'•0to 110 

Discount off list. 2 p- 
boxe» 40 off All price: 



Double 

Diamond 

$6 25 

6 75 

7 50 

8 50 

9 75 

11 00 

12 50 
15 00 
17 50 
20 50 
24 00 
27 50 

r ent F r broken 
per ICO feet 



Star 
$1 25 

4 65 

5 10 
5 35 

5 75 

6 25 

7 00 



ZINC— DRY WHITE. 

Extra Red Seal 1,7 o« 

French V. M 06 25 

Lehigh 05 u6 

ZINC- GROUND WHITE. 

Pure 08J 09J 

No. 1 07 08 

o. 2 C5J C 06j 



VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, Japan 150 160 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 150 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 C 90 1 00 

Hard oil finish 1 35 1 50 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Brown japan 1 10 1 20 

Black japan 110 120 

No. 1 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine loor varnish, per gal ... 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 1.20 

size 2, 70c; size 3, 40c. each. 

Sherwin-Williams kopal varnisn, gal , 2.50 

Canada Paint Co s sun varnish ... 2 00 

" Kyanize" Interior Finish 2 40 

" Flint-Lac." coarh 180 

" Gold Medal." per gal., ii cases.. 2 09 

Jamieson's ('opaline, per ga! 2 no 

Sanderson Pearcy's amberine 2 50 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE. 

BELLS. 

Brass h ind 1 ell j, 60 per cent. 

Nickel, 55_per cent. 

Gongs, Sargeaui s door bells. . ^50 8 00 

Peterboro do. r bells, discount 374 ^nd in 

per rent, off new list. 
American, hjiiec bells, per lb. 35 u 40 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 2 25 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, uol under 45 lb. 

per roll ', 95 

Ready rooting, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 20 

Carpet Felt per ton 55 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry .Surprise u 40 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 5) 

Tar " • too " 45 

Dry Fibre ' 400 " 55 

Tarred Eibre " 400 " 65 

U. K. & I. X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 ' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 ■■ 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 2> 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 Oo 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Rooting Pitch per 100 lb. 80 90 

Slater's felt per roll 70 

Heavy Straw Sheathing f. o. b. St. 

John and Halifax 37 50 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 
Wrought Iron, 70 per ctnt. 
Cast Iron Loose fin. discount 60 per cei t. 
Wrought Steel Fast Joint and Loose Pin, 
1O per cent.. 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK. 

" Lafarge " cement in wood 3 40 

" Lehigh " cement, in wood 2 54 

"Lehigh" cement, cotton sacks 2 39 

" Lehigh " cemeut, paper sacks 2 31 

Fire brick (Scotch I per 1,1 00. . . . 15 00 24 On 

Fire clay (Scotch), net ton 4 95 

Pal-in'.- Blocks prr 1 0D0. 
Blue metallic, 9"x4 "x3", ex wharf . . 35 00 
Stable pavers, 12"x6"x2". ex wharf . . 50 00 
r- table pavers, 9"x4J"x ", ex wharf .. 36 00 

DOOR SK'H. 

Peterboro, 37i and 10 per cent 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

lorrey's Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 165 

Fnelish " ill. 4 on 

Chicago and Reliance Coil Door 8prings, 25 
per ce. t 

STORE DOOR HANDLES. 

Ter Dozen 1 00 1 50 



ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per oent., new list 
Peterboro, 37J and 10 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

I -on. discount 40 per cent. 
Brass, 45 per cent. 

HINGES. 

Blind, discount 60 per ceni. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb. net . 06} 

" " 5-in., " 06 

6-in., " 05j 

8-in., " 05* 

10-in. and larger . . 05} 
Light T and strap, discount 65 d.c. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

uo^er 12 in.... per 100 1b 4 75 

over 12 in " 3 75 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 80 

Spring, Woodyatt pattern, per gro.. No. 5, 
817.50 No. 10, 818 ; No. 20, 810.80 ; No. 
12 820 : No. 51. 810 : No 50. 827 50. 
Crate binges and btc flaps, 65 ana 5 p. c 
Hinge hasps, 65 per cent. 

SPRING HINGES. 
ChicagoSpring Butt sand Blanks 12} percent. 
Triple ESi d Spring Butt*. 4o and 5 percent. 
( hicago Floor Hinges. 40 and 5 off. 
Garden City Fire Engine House Hinges, 12} 
per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Cast Iron. 

Bird sage per do;\ rVi 110 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought hooks .and staples— 

i x 5 per gross 2 65 

5-16x5 " .... 3 30 

Brivht st^el gate hooks and staples, 40 per 

Oi nt. discount. 
Hat and . o>.t, wire discount 61} per rent. 
Screw, bright wire, discount 62} per cent. 

SNOBs. 

Door, japanned and N.I'., doz I 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin ,ier doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine " 6 00 !1 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

sjrew per gross 130 2 00 

White door knnhs ..per doz. ... 2 00 
Peterboro I. nobs, 37, and 10 per c- nt 
Porcelan mineral and jet knoln, net list, 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent 
Cabinet trunk and padlock 

American per gross 60 

LOCKS. 
Peterb.ro 37'/2 and 10 per rem 
RiisopII * Rrwin, steel rim 82.50 iw>r Hn7 
Eagle cabinet locks, discount 30 per rent 
Ameriean 1 adlocks, all Meel, 10 to 15 per 

rent.; all bra>s or bronze, 10 to 25 per c nt. 

SAND ANT> KM"RY PAPER. 

B. & A. sand, discount, 35 per oenl 
Emery, discount 35 per cent. 
rWnet (Rurton'si 5 to 10 per cent, advance 
on list. 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 31 

BLIND VSli BBS STAPLES 

All sizes, per lb 07! 12 

WROUGHT STAPLES. 

Galvanized 2 75 

Plain 2 50 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 percent. 

B-ight s,jear point, 75 per cent. discount 



TOOLS AND HANDLES. 

ADZES. 

Discount 22} per cent. 

AUOEHS. 

Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 8 50 

Double bit, " 10 00 11 00 



6 00 

7 00 
12 00 

9 00 
5 75 
5 25 



Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axee. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 550 

Boys' Axes 6 25 

Splitting Axes 7 00 

Handled AxeB 7 00 

Bed Ridge, bora', handled 

hunters 

BITS. 

Irwin a auger, discount 47} 1 er rent 
Giluiour s auger, discoun 60 per cent. 
Rockford auger, discount 50 and 10 per ceni. 
Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 
Gilmours cai, 47J percent. 
Clark s expansiv. , 40 per cent. 

Clark 8 giinifi, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 



German . 
A imrican 



BUTCHERS CLEAVKKn 

...... ner doz. 6 00 

" 12 00 



9 00 
18 00 



7.' 
65 



CHALK 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 
White lump per cwt. 60 

CHISELS. 

Warnock's, discount 12} per cent. 

P. S. & W. Extra, discount 72' \ per a nt 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. 4 D., No. 3 per pair 15 

S. & D., " 5 K 224 

S.&D., " 6 •• 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

0BOWBAB8. 

S%C to4c. per lb. 

DRAW KNIVES 

mch and Wagon, discount 75 p«i oent. 
Carpenters discount 75 per cent 

DRILLS. 
Millar's halls, hand and breast net list 
Ncrth Bros , ..tch set, 5Cc. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 37} to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per ceo 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 per rem . 

Arcade 75 

Kearney & Foot 75 

Disstons 75 

American 75 

J. Barton Smith 75 

McClellan 7 

Eagle 75 

Nichol son 661 

Globe 75 

Black Diamond. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Jowitt's, English list, 27} per cenu 

OAUOEs. 

>taiilt->'o discount 50 to 60 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's. Noa. 26 to 33 ....each 165 2 40 

HANDLES. 

C. & B., fork, 40 per cent., re/ised list. 
C. A B., hoe, 40 per cent., revised list. 

American, saw per doz 25 

American, plane ... per gross 3 15 3 75 
Canadian, nammer and hatchet 40 percent 
Axe and cant hook handles. 45 per cent. 

HAMMERS. 

Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 25 to 27} per cent. 

Magnetic tack per doz. 1 in 1 20 

Canadian sledge .... per lb. II 07 08} 
Canadian h ill pean, per lb. . . 22 25 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 42} per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel Underhill 5 00 



1 i nsmiths' per doz. 1 25 

Carpenters', hickory, 1 25 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 

Caulking, each 60 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per dot. 5 50 



1 5u 
S 75 
5 00 

2 00 



6 00 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EVAPORATION REDUCED TO A MINIMUM 

is one of the reasons why PATERSON'S WIRE EDGED READY ROOFING 
will last longer than any other kind made. 

Mr. G. R. Decker, Chesterfield, Ont., used our 3 Ply Wire Edged Ready Roof- 
ing fourteen years ago, and he says it is apparently just as good as when first put on. 

We have hundreds of other customers whose experience has been similar 
to Mr. Decker's. 

THE PATERSON MFC. CO., Limited, Toronto and Montreal 



MEAT CUTTERS. 
German, IS per cent. 
American discount, 33$ per cent. 
Gem each .... 115 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 85 2 SO 

No. 1 85 

No 1573 75 

NAIL 8ETS. 
Square, round and octagou.per gross 3 38 

Diamond 1 00 

PICKS. 

Per dozen 600 900 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent. 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 371 to 

40 per cent 
Stanley planes, $1 55 to $3 60, net list prices. 
PLANE IRONS. 

English per do/.. 2 on 5 00 

Stanley, 22 inch, single 24c, double 39c. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button 9 genuine, 37J to 40 per cent. 
Button s imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler s per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductor's " 3 00 15 00 

rinners , solid per set 72 

" hollow per inch 1 00 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent 
RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
[Tory, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

SAWS. 
Atkins, hand and crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, discount 12J per cent 

Disston's Crosscut per foot 35 55 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only ..each 50 125 

S. It D. solid tooth circular shingle, con- 
cave and band, 50 per cent ; mill and ice. 
drag, 30 per cent . ; cross-cut, 35 per cent ; hand 
saws, butcher. 35 per cent ; buck, New 
Century 86.25. luck No. 1 Maple Leaf, 
Si.25: buck, Happy Medium $4.25; buck, 
Watch Spring, $1.25: buck, common frame, 
$4.00. 

Speari Jackson's saws— Hand or rip 26 in.. 
$12 75: 2J in. $H.2S; panel, 18 in., $8.25; 
20 in , $): tenon, 10 in., *9.90 ; 12 in., I 
14 in . U 

RAW SETS. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X-CutKetn. " 7 SO 

Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 40 off. 
S. & D. saw swages, 40 off. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

^argent a perdoz. 65 100 

jjorlh Brjs., No. 30 . .per doz 16 83 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Bull Dog, solid neck shovel (No. 2 pol.).$18 50 
(Hollow Back) (Reinforced S Scoop.) 

Moose $17 50 $16 30 

Bear 15 00 15 30 

Fox 12 50 14 30 

Black Cat... 10 00 13 30 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SQUARES. 
Iron, discount 20 per 
H'eel, discount 65 and lu per cent. 
Try »nd Revel, -liiiciiunt 50 to 524 per cent. 

TAPE LINES. 

F.ngnsh. ans skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

F.oidish. Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Oheaterman's each 90 2 85 

" teel each 80 8 00 

TROWELS. 

Disston's. discount 10 per cent. 
K, IB., discount 36 per c«nt. 



FARM AND GARDEN GOODS 



American cow bells, 635 per oenc 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

American, farm bells, each . . 1 35 3 00 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper; $1.30 for 2J-inch, and $1.70 

CATTLE LEADER8. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

BARS DOOR HANGERS. 

doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns wood track 4 50 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Acme, wood track 5 00 6 50 

Atlas 5 0J 6 00 

Perfect 8 00 11 00 

New Milo 6 50 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1x3-16 in( 100 ft) .... 3 75 

" 1} x 3-16 indOO ft) .... 4 75 

Double strap hangers, doz. sets 6 40 

Standard jointed hangers, " 6 40 

Steel King hangers " 6 25 

StormKingandsafetyhangers 7 00 

" rail 4 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 

Hangers, 5 per cent. 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

S. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

" sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 



HAY KNIVES. 
HEAD HALTERS. 

inch.... per gross 



Net prices. 
Jute Rope, 



Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, H " " 

Web 



9 00 
10 00 
12 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand, 40, 10 and 7} per cent, off list J Oval 
M.R.M. Co brand, 55 per cent, 1 head 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 

M.R.M. Co. brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 
HORSE WEI". II l i 
Taylor-Forbes. 3}c. per lb. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 25 9 25 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 



Harness, German, discount 2.) per Tent. 
Lock. Andrews' 4 50 1100 

STALL FIXTURES, 

Warden King, 35 per cent. 

WOOD HAY RAKES. 



Ten tooth, 40 and 10 per cent. 
Twelve tooth, 45 per cent. 



HEAVY GOODS NAILS, ETC. 

ANVILS. 

WrightB, 80-lb. and over 10J 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Rrook's. 10-lb. and over Oil} 

Taylor- Forbes, handy 05 

Wright's 13* 

Brook s 12} 

Pine Vise, Hinge, No. 1 350 

No. 2 5 50 

«»w Vise . . 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

parallel (disoount) 45 per oent. 



BOLT8 AND NUTS 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per cent. 

" I and smaller. . 60, 10 and 10 

" " 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 50 

Machine Bolts, | and less 60 and 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 10 

Blank Bolts 55 

BoltEnds 55 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 1 and less . . 60 and 10 

" " " 7-16 and larger 50 and 5 

Coaoh Screws, conepoint 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c. per off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4fc. per off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 5$ to 6c. 
Stove Bolts, 75 per cent. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHKR . 

dnadianjinake discount 40 per cent. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, per 100 lb., 516 in.. $4.40 ; g in., 
83.91; 7.16 i„, §3.70; ' in., $3 5U; 9-16 in.. 
S3 45; I in., $3.85; I in., $3.20; 1 in., $3.10; 
1 in.. $3.10. 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.o. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain iron, diacoun" 35 p.c. 

Jack chain, brasB, diicounr 40 per cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Pressed spikes, 8 diameter, per 100 lbs., $3.15 

NAILS. Cut. Wire. 

2d 3 80 3 30 

3d 2 95 8 95 „ 

4 and 5d 2 70 2 70 

6and7d 2 60 2 60 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 45 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 4") 

16and20d 2 35 2 35 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 31 

F.o.b. Montreal. Cut nails, Toronto 20c. 
higher. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 pe cent 
Coopers' nails, discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60, 10 and 10 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
f'opper Rivets, usual proportion burrs,27i P "'• 
Copper Burrs only, discount 15 per < em. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets, i-lb. pa-kages 

lc. per lb.; J-lb packages Jo. lb 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 4c. per lb. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 87*,' per cent. 

" R. H., bright, dis. 82J pei cent 

" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 

11 R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 

" F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 

" R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 87J per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, oase hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Flat head, iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Felister head, iron, discount 30 per cent. 
" " brass, discount 25 per cent. 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 5 

" " tinned 80 and 10 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 75 and 10 

J weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk ... 85 and 12J 
" brush, blued and tinned 
bulk 70 

64 



Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12 J 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKs 40 

Copper tacks 371 

Copper nails 42J 

Trunk nails, black 65 

Trunk nails, tinned and blued . . 65 

Clout nails, blued and tinned . . 65 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining t acks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " Bolid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers. . 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

niinch and duck rivets 45 

Cheese box tacks, 85 and 5 ; trunk tacks, 80 

and 10. 



CUTLERY AND SPORTING 
GOODS. 

AMMUNITION. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and5 aud 25 per cent. 
American $2.00 per 1000. 

O. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000 
CARTRIDGES. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 and 5 per cent, 
American. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, idd 10 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol and rifle 
Dominion, 30 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent , American 
10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, Crown, 25 and 
5 : Sovereign. 25, 10 and 10 ; Regal, 25, 10 
and 5 ; Imperial, 25, 10 and 5. American 
20 per cent, discount. Rival and Nitro, 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Empty paper shells Dominion, 25 off and 
empty brass shells, 55 per cent. off. Am- 
erican, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Primers, Dom., 35 per cent. : American $2 05 
Wade. per lo. 

BeBt thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

J-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 

Best thick white card wads in boxes 

of 500 each. 10 gauge 35 

Ihin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 21) 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,010 

each, lOgauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 lu 

Superior chemioally prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,T 1 65 

5 and 9 " 1 90 

sin it. 
Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.50 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $8 50 net 
list. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton, 
Montreal, St. John and Halifax. Terms, 
Z p.o. foe cash in thirty days. 

razors. per doz. 

BUiot's 4 00 18 00 

Boker'B 7 50 11 00 

" King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade 4 Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Wilkinson's .... 12 50 

Lewis Bros.' " Klean Kutter 8 50 10 50 

Clauss Razors and Strops, 50 and 10 per cent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



\A/o maki 



ectric Fixtures, Soolcots, and Ocit-OiJ-tt 




lectrical Supplies o-f all kinds. 



MONTREAL. 



No Waste Circulation tf^Z^JE?- r " 



PLATE! > GOODS 
Hollowware, 40 per cent, (list mint. 
Flatware, staples, 40 ami 10, fancy 40 and 5 
per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, nickel, discount 60 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 674 per cent. 
Clauss, tailors, disoount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 30 and 10 per oent 
Game, Hawley & Norton, 50, 10 & 5 percent. 
Game, Victor, 70 per cent. 
Game, Oneida Jump (B. &L.)40&21 p. c. 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per cent. 

SKATES. 

Skates, discount 37% per cent. 

Mic Mac hockey sticks, per doz 4 CO 5 00 

New Rex hockey sticks, per doz .... 6 25 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS. 

APrLE FARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

BIRD CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 and 10 p. c. 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boilers, kettles, teapots, etc. 30 p.c. 
Copper pitts, 33i per cent. 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

London, White, Princess, Turquoise, Onyx, 

Blue and While, discount 50 per cent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 50 and 10 p c. 
Pearl, Imperial Crescent, SO and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
Star decorated steel and white, 25 per cent. 
Japanned ware, discount 50 per cent. 
Hollow ware, tinned cast, 35 per cent. off. 

KITCHEN" NOVELTIES. 

Can openers, per doz 40 75 

Mincing knives per doz 50 83 

Duplex mouse traps, per doz 65 

Potato mashers, wire, per doz. . . 60 70 

wood " .. 60 60 

Vege* able sheers, per doz 2 25 

Universal meat chopper No. 0,81; No.l, 1.15. 

Enterprise chopper, each 1 30 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

Xing, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

Allglass " 50 90 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

Tin and gilt, picture wire, 75 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished per set 80 

" No. 50, nickle-plated, " 92 

Common, plain 4 50 

" plated s 50 

Asbestos, per set 125 



TINWARE. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2 in. plain or corrugated., per 100 feet, 
13.30; 3 in, $4.40; 4 in., $5.80; 5 in., $7.45: 
6 in., $9.9.>. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUOH8. 
10-inob per 100 ft. 3 30 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
Milk can trimmings, discount 25 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

No. 2 or 4 Plain Cold Blast .... per doz. 6 50 



Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, 
Better quality at higher prices. 
Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 



4 75 



OILERS. 

Kemp's Tornado andMcClary s Model 
galvanized oil can, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent 

Zinc and tin, discount 50 per cent 

Coppered oilers, 20 per cent. off. 

Brass oilers, 50 per cent, off. 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

PAILS (GALVANIZED). 

Dufferin pattern pails, 40, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Flaring Dattern, discount 40, 10 aud 5 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs 40. 10 and 5 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. rlarii .g sap buckets, discount 40 per ceL t. 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 35 p.c. 
Creamery cans, discount 40 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, 75 and 124 per cent, off revised list. 
Retiuned, 724 10 and 5 per cent, revised list. 
SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks . . . .per 1,000 7 50 
Eureka tinned steel, hooks 8 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 



STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch " 1 48 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent 

TINNERS' 8NIP8. 

Per doz 3 00 15 00 

Olauss, discount 35 percent. 



WIRE. 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount 624 per oent. 

CLOTIIKS LINK WIRE. 

7 wire solid line, No. 17. $4.90; No. 
18, $3.00; No. 19, S2.70 ; « wire solid line, 
No. 17, $4.45; No. 18, $2.80. No. 19. $2.50. 
All prices per 1000 ft. measure. F.o.b. Hamil- 
ton Toronto. Moutreal. 

COILED SI-KIN'* WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9, 82 55, No. 11. $3.20; 
No. 12. $2.80. 

COPPER INI) BRASS WIItE. 

Discount 45 per cent. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 30 per cent List of extras: 
In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, $5 — No. 18, 
$5.50 — No. 19, $6 - No. 20, $6.65 - No. 21, 
$71 - No. 22, $7.30 - No 23, $7,65 - No. 
24, $8 - No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50-No. 27, 
$10-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13- 
No. 31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4^Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
75c.— oiling, 10c.— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c.— in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c.— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in 4-lb. hanks, 38c.— in J-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c.— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 



GALVANIZED WIRE. 
Per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, $3.70 - 
Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 — No. 9, $2.50 - 
No. 10, $3.20 No. 11, $3.25-No. 12, $2.65 
-No. 13, $2.75-No. 14. $3.75-No 15, $4.30 
—No. 16. $4.30 from stock. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2.35 f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlo! h 
124o. less. 

LIGHT STRAIGHTENED WIRE. 

Over 20 in. 

Gauge No. per 100 lbs. 10 to 20 in. 5 to 10 in. 

to 5 $0.50 $0.75 $1.25 

6 to 9 0.75 1.25 2 00 

10 to 11 1.00 1.75 2.50 

12 to 14 1.50 2.25 3.50 

15 to 16 2.00 3.00 4.50 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.25; No. 10 gauge, 6c. 
extra; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra; No. 12 
gauge, 20c. extra ; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra 1 ; 
No 14 gauge. 40c. extra; No. 15 gauge. 55c. 
extra ; No. 16 gauge, 7 c. extra. Add 6Cc. 
for coppering and $2 for tinning. 

Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c , 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c. , 
best steel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, in 4-lb. hanks 75c, in J-lb. 
hanks $1. 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2 in mesh 19 w. g., discount 50 and 10 per 
cent. All others 50 per cent. 

WIRE OT.OTH 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls. $1.82%, per 
100 sq. ft.; in 50-ft. rolls $1.67%, per 100 sq.ft. 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 95 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 30 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, % 2 .70 r or 
small lots and $2.i>0 for carlot . 



WOOOENW^RE. 

CHURNS. 
No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, ; No. 3, 

$11 ; No. 4, $13 : No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 30 and 30 
per cent; fob. Ottiwa, Kingston and 
Montreal, 40 and 15 per cent, discount, 
Taylor-Forbes, 30 and 31 per cent. 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis. 40 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders.dis.40 per cent. 

Ml IPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

"Best "mops 125 

"900 mops 125 

Folding ironing toards 12 03 16 50 

REFRIGERATORS 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

SCREEN DOORS. 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. style per doz. 7 25 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, grained 

only, 4-in., style per doz. 7 55 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, light s! air 

pel doz 9 55 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 60 00 

Square " ' 63 00 

Eclipse, per doz 54 00 

Dowswell " 39 00 

New Century, per doz 75 00 

Daisy 54 00 

WRINGERS. 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., per doz. ... 34 00 

Royal American. 11 in. ... 34 00 

Eze. 10 in., per do/. 3)75 

Ti rni«, 2 per cent.. 30 days. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 p <• 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per e. ,,i 
Lace leather, per side, 75c; cut laces, 80c. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M 4 25 

Small heel " < 5u 

CARPET 8TRETCHER8. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Bullard's " .... fi 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent- 
Plate, discount 524 to 57J per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

" n ... 9 60 

PULLETS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 100 

Axle '• 22 33 

Screw '• 22 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 140 2 00 

Canadian pitcher spout ... 1 80 3 16 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal 10i 

Pure Manilla 15| 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

lincb 25 28 

Russia Deep Ses 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, Bingle 10 

double 10J 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" " 72 feet " 95 

Twine. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 25 

" 4-piy 29 

Mattress twine per lb 33 45 

Staging " " 27 J5 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, discount 40 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
" Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

8TONE8— OIL AND SCYTHE. 

Washita per lb. 25 37 

Hindostan " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

" Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek 10 

Deerlick " 25 

Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " .... 42 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr ' .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton.... 20 00 22 00 

" under 40 lb., ' 24 00 

" 20J lb. and over 28 00 



65 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



KEARNEY & FOOT 



The 

Best 

Rasp 

Made 








The 
Rasp 
that 
sells 



MADE BY 



Nicholson File Co., 



Dominion 
Wks. 



Port Hope, Ont 



Wrought Iron Pipe am Cast Iro n Fittings 

Our Stock in these lines is complete. 
Can fill all orders promptly. Be sup- 
plied before the Fall rush commences. 



WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



A 

AlabastineCo ■- 

Armstrong Bros Tool Co 14 

Armstrong Mfg. Co C2 

Atttins, E. C, a Co 60 

Atlas Mfg. Co io 

B 

Bauwell Hone, Wire Fence Co 18 

Ham»tt. O. 4 H. Co outside back cover 

Berrv Bros 51 

Birkett. Thos. s Son Co 1 

Bl. in hue Pro iss Paint Co 53 

Bowmanville Foundry Co 12 

Krandram Henderson 48 

Brantford Cordage Co 20 

Brantford Rooting Co 9 

B ir uian s Sons, Ltd 16 

Burr Mfg Co IS 

Business Systems 16 

c 

CaDada Foundry Co 12 

Canada lion Furnace i;- .. 41 

Canada Metal Co 14, 3 

Canada Paint Co 5U 

Canada Paoer l'<i 12 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works 47 

Canadian Fairbanks to . 58, 6 1 

Canadian Healing & Ventilating C<>. . 17 

Canadian Oil 00 52 

Canadian Hewer Pipe Co 4i 

Cat erhill. Learuiont 4 Co 7 

Cbicago Spring Butt Co 1 

Clause Shear Co 63 

Cluff Bros 59 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 42 

Consumers Cordage Co 4 

Copp, W J 37 

Covert Mfg. Co 14 

dimming Mfg. Co 53 

D 

Davenport, I'-r.y I' 12 

Davidson, Thos.. Mig. Co 4 

Dennis Iron and Wire Co 13 

Dieckmann. Ferdinand 13 

Dominion Wire Mfg. Co lu 

Dorken Bros outride front cover 

Dowswell Mfg Co 9 

DuD'las Axe Works 16 

E 

Eadie,H.G 40 

Emljrn Saw Bench 14 



English Embrocation Co 68 

Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Akron, Ohio 

inside ha--k cover 
Erie Specialty Co inside back cover 



Finan ial Post 38 

Forman, John 59 

Forwell Foundry Co 58 

Fox. C. H 4 i 

Frothingham & Workman . . 6 



Gait Art Metal Co 45 

Gibh Alexander 44 

Gib8one, J. B 16 

Gilhertson, W., 4 Co 41 

Glauber Brass Co. 58 

c: .int. .ff. B A 11 

( iruvel, Ludger Co 44 

Greening, B., Wire Co 18 

Guelph Sp'iog and Axle Co 41 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co.... 

Outside back cover 

H 

Hamilton Cotton Co 11 

Hanover Port an 1 Cement Co 12 

Harris, J. W., Co 11 

Heinisch. R.. Sons Co 14 

HobbsMfg. Co 14 

Howland. H. H., Sons * Co 5 

Hutton, Jaa., & Co 58 

Hyde, F. ft do 13 

I 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 46 

International Portland Cement Co . . . 12 



Jamieson, R. C,., 4Co 47 

Jardine. A. B., & Co 41 

Johnson s, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 44 

Joy Mfg Co 17 



Kemp Mfg. Co.. 
Kerr Engine Co 



Lamplough, F. W. & Co 11 

L«lie, A. O., * Co 41 

Lewis Bros. , Limited 3 

Lewis, Rice. & Son inside front cover 



Lockerby 4 McComb 60 

London Foundry Co tiU 

L-mdon Rolling Mills 12 

Lucas. John 49 

L ifVin Rule Co inside hack cover 

Lysa^ht, John outside front cover 

Mc 

McArthur. Alex., A Co 62 

McOaskill, Dougall 4 Co 47 

McClary Mfg. Co 17 

McDougall, R, Co 60 

M 

Macfarlan-, Walter 68 

Martel-Stetvart Co 13 

Martin-Senour Co 49 

Maxwell David 68 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 45 

Metallic Rooting Co 39 

Millen, John 4 Son outside back cover 

Mitchell, 11 W . 44 

Moore, Benjamin, S Co 51 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co 50 

.Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co ... . 14 

Mueller, H , Mfg. Co 61 

Munderloh 4 Co 65 



N 



Newman, W., 4 Sons 15 

Nicholson File Co 66 

North BroB. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Ooal Co 41 



Oakey, John. 4 Sons 41 

Ontario Steel Ware Co 15 

Ontario Tack Co 39 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co . . 15 

Orford Copper Co 41 

Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Ftting Co 58 



Patersou Mfg. Co 64 

Pelton, Godfrey S 47 

Penberthy Injector Co 61 

Peterborough Lock Co 9 

Peterborough Shovel 4 Tool Co 20 



Phillip*, flhas. n 45 

Phillip., Geo., 4 Co 13 

Pink, Thos 2 



Queen City Oil Co 11 



Ramsay, A.. 4 Sou Co 49 

Reid David 37 

Robertson. James Co. . . .inside back cover 

Roper, J. H 18 

Round, John, 4 Son 10 



s 



Samuel, M 4 L., Benjamin, 4 Co 2 

Scott, Bathgate 4 Co 44 

Sells Commercial 45 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 14 

Shantz, I. E, 4 Co 58 

Sharratt 4 Newth 58 

Shirrerf Mfg. Co 13 

Sherwin-William. Co 40 

Shurley 4 Deitrirh 8 

Silica Barytic Stone Co 14 

Stairs, Son 4 Morrow 66 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co 54 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 47 

Stanley Rule & Level Co 47 

Starr Mfg. O j 19 

Stephens, G. F.,4 Co 31 

Still, J. H , Mfg 16 



Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Thompson, B 4 ^ H.. Co. 001 side back co»er 
Toronto and Belleville Roll ng Mills. . . 15 
Turner Brass WorkB 59 



Viokery O !8 



W 

Warminton, J.N 41 

Western Wire Nail Co 9 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co 37 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co 12 



• 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Auditors. 

Davenport, Percy 1\, Win 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Robertson, Jaa. Co,, Montreal. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Carriage Mounting Co., Toronto. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 
Gotta l'ercha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 
Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson a, Iver, Anus and Cycle Works 
Fitehburg, Mass 

Binder Twine. 
Consumers Cordage Co., Montreal. 

Box Strap. 

J. N. Warjiimon, Montreal. 

Brass Goods. 

Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
l.rwis, Rice, ft Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Mueller Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
1'enberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Onl. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Bronze Powders. 

Canadian Bronze Powder Works, Mon- 
treal. 

Brushes. 

Ramsay, A., & Son Co., Montreal. 

Can Openers. 

dimming Mfg. Co. Renfrew. 

Cans. 

Acme Can Works, Montreal. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Krothinghaui ft Workman Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Hyde. F., ft Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. ft Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby ft McComb, Montreal. 
Luf kin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Newman ft Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Carriage Accessories. 

Carriage Mountings Co., Toronto. 
Covert Mtg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelph. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co. .Nashua, N.H 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co. , Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Clutch Nails. 

J. N. Warmint n Montreal. 

Cut Glass. 

Phillips, Geo., ft Co., Montreal. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., ft Son Co., Ottawa. 
Clauss Shear Co., Toronto 
Dorken Bros, s Co., Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Howland, H. S. Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Phillips, Geo.. ft Co., Montreal. 
Uound, John, * Son, Montreal. 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian General Electrio Co., Toronto. 
Forman, John, Montreal. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh ft Co., Montreal. 

Electro Cabinets. 

Cameron ft Campbell Toronto. 

Engines, Supplies, etc, 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 



Files and Rasps. 

Bamett Co.. G. ft H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nil Imlson File Co., Port Hope 

Financial Institutions 

Bradstreet Co. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Etifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington ft Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnsou's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitehburg, Mass. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Shlrrefl Ufg Co . BrookTlUe, Ont, 
Galvanizing. 

Canada Meral Co., Toronto. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co., 
Toronto. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Gibsone, J. B., Modi i iii 
Pelton, Godfrey S. 
Sharratt & Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., ft Son, London, Eng. 

Handles 

Still, J. H , Mfg. Co. 

Harvest Tools. 

Marie Leaf Harvest Tool Co , Titlson- 
burg Ont. 

Hoop Iron. 

Montreal Rolling Mil's Co , Montreal. 
J. N. Warminton, Montreal. 

Horse Blankets. 

Heney, E. N., ft Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills. Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers and Radi- 
ators. 

Cluff, R. J., ft Co., Toron o 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North BroB. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Out. 

Wright, E. T., ft Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos., ft Son Co., Ottawa. 
Maxwell, D., ft Sons, St. Mary s, Ont. 
Taylor, Forbes Co.,Uuelph. 

Lawn Swings, Settees, Chairs. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Renfrew. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Business Systems, Toronto. 
Copeland-Chatterson Co , Toronto. 
Crain, Rolla L., Co.. Ottawa. 
Universal Systems, Toronto. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke Ont. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Fox, C. H. , Vancouver. 

Gibb, Alexander. Montreal. 

Mitchell, David C, ft Co., Glasgow.Scot. 

Mitchell, H. W., Winnipeg. 

Pearce, Frank, ft Co. Liverpool, Eng. 

Scott, Bathgate ft Co., Winnipeg. 

Thome, R. E., Montreal and Toronto. 



Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Kadic, II G., Montreal. 

Qlbbi Alexander, Montreal. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Leslie, A. 0., ft Co., Montreal. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Nova Scotia steel and Coal Co., New 

I rlaflgOW. N.S. 
Bobertscin, .im. . Oo., Montreal 
Roper, J. H, uontroal 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 
Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Thompson. B. ft S. H. ft Co. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston, 
Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc 

Oakey, John, ft Sons, London, Eng. 

Mops. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Refrew. 

Mouse Traps. 

Cumming Mfg. Co., Renfrew. 

Oil Tanks 

Bowser. S. F., & Co., Toronto. 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Glass. 

Bell, Thos., Sons & Co , Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co.. Toronto 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co. , Toronto. 
Fenner, Fred., ft Co., London, Eng. 
Henderson & Potts Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. 0., ft Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Corneille ft Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill. Dougatl ft Co.. Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Moore. Benjamin, ft Co. Tot onto, 
yueen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay & Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens & Co., Winnipeg. 
Martin-Senour Co., Chicago. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Borden Co,, Warren, Ohio. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Cluff, R. J., & Co., Toronto. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., Boston, Mass. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 
Merrell Mfg. Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Mi ntreal Rolling Mids Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Mueller, H., Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Oshawa Steam & Gas Fitting Oo.Oshawa 
Robertson Jas., Co. Montreal. 
Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
Standard Sanitary Co., Pittsburg. 
Stephens, G F, &Co., Winnipeg, Man. 
Turner Brass Works, Chicago. 
Vickery, Orlando, Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

International Portland Cement Co., 

Ottawa, Ont. 
Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., ft Co., Montreal. 
Thompson, B. ft S. H. ft Co., Montreal. 

Potato Mashers. 

Cumming Mfg Co., Renfrew. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Razors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toronto. 



Roofing Supplies. 



Brantford Rooting Co., Brantford. 
McArthor, Alex., A Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallio Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto ft Montreal 

Saws. 

Atkins, E.G., ft Co., Indianapolis, Ind 
Lewis Bros., Montreal. 
Shurly ft Dietrich, Gait, Ont. 
Spear ft Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 



Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co , Montreal 

Strew Cabinets. 

Cameron ft Campbell, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Mmlreal Rolling Mills Co, Montreal. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw I 

IliKerHnll. Ont. 

Se wcr Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hanoi! or 
Hyde, F., ft Co.. Montreal. 

Shelf Boxes . 

Cameron ft Campbell, Toronto 

Shears, Scissors. 

Clauss Shear Co., Toront . 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Shellac 

Bell, Thos., Sons ft Co., Montreal 

Shovels and Spades. 

Canadian Shovel Co.. Hamilton. 
Peterboro Shovel ft Tool Co , Peterboro; 

Silverware, 

Phillips, Geo., ft Co., Montreal. 
Round, John, ft Son, Sheffield. Eng. 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Chicago, 111. 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel ft Ooal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stores, Tinware, Furnaces 

Canadian Heating ft Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Canada Stove Works, Harriston, Ont. 
Clare Bros, ft Co., Preston. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Guelph Stove Co., Guelph. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Joy Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co. Toronto. 
McUlary Mfg. Co. London. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Stewart, Jaa., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,ft Co., Hamilton. 

Tacks. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 

Ventilators. 

Harris. J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Pearson, Geo. D., Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wheelbarrows 

London Foundry Co., London, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., ft Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham ft Workman, Montreal. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 
Howland, H. S., Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Broa. ft Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, ft Son, Toronto. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms. 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Wire Springs. 

Guelph Spring Axle Co., Guelph, Onj 
Wallace-Barnes Co.. Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

Canada Fence Co., London. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal 
Greening, B.. Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Weatern Wire ft Nail Co., London, Ont. 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbea Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Torento. 
McArthur, Alez., ft Co , Montreal. 
Stairs, Son ft Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




FAVORITE 



CHURN 



More sold in the Dominion 
than all others oomblned 



In S si/rs, churning from J-a to SO gallons. 
IMPROVED STEEL FRAME. PATENT FOOT and LEVER DRIVE. 

PATENT STEEL ROLLER BEARINGS 
I las] i,' operate. Bolts throughout in place of wood 
lerior in workmanship and finish. No other 
Just as Rood. Accept no substitute. If not offered by 
your jobber write direct to us. 



MAXWELL 
LAWN 
MOWER 




Made In 4 different heights of wheel and widths, 
ranging from 8 to 25-irt. In plain or ball bearings as 

required. Improved for coming season. Not equalled 
anywhere for clean cutting, durability and finish. 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 

ST. MARY'S, 0NT. 




LION 



99 



BRAND 



Trade Mark 



PUTZ TRIPLE EXTRACT 

METAL POLISH 

LIQUID and PASTE 

For polishing all kinds of metals " Lion " 
Brand Putz Triple Extract Metal Polish 
has no equal. Gives a lasting lustre. Put 
up in liquid and paste form. Has a ready 
sale. If not in stock send a postal for ex- 
ceptional terms. Something that will give 
you handsome profits. 

English Embrocation Co., 

Montreal, Quebec 











CASTINGS SUPMLO Cut 1 fiTTtO TO nCASURCMU"TS 
Drain plans workco out r,.,i ARCHITCCTS 

CATALUCUtS AND PP.ICES ON APPLICATION 



AGENTS 
W. PORTEOUS JACK, 1256 Robson, Vancouver 
GEO. PEATT & CO., P.O. Box 466, Winnipeg, Man. 
BAXTER, PATERSON & CO., 102 St. Antoine St., Montreal. 



Perforated 
Sheet Metals 

IN 

BRASS, COPPER, 
STEEL, Etc. 

ALL SIZES OP PERFORATIONS AND 
THICKNESS Of METALS 

FOR 

MINERS' USE 

GRAIN-CLEANING MACHINERY 

BEE KEEPERS 

MALT KILN FLOORS, Etc. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, Ont. MONTREAL, Que. 



68 



•I 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THURBER 

Babbitt Metal 




IS CONCEDED BY EXPERTS TO BE THE 

BEST BABBITT 

For Heavy Slow Machinery 

Heavy Line Shafting, etc. 

12c. lb. TR1 IT. 

The James Robertson Co., Limited 

144 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 



PFLUEGERS 
Fishing' TacKle 




Hoohs, Flies, 
Trolls, Spin- 
ners, Phan- 
toms, Reels, 
Furn is h ed 
Lines. 

Everything 
in " Fishing 
TacKle. 



NOTICE — Free to Any Dealer in Sporting Goodi, 
Sent Express Prepaid, 170-Page Illustrated Cata- 
logue No. Fas, » n d Metal Fish Sign in 8-Color 
Lithograph. 

The Enterprise Mfg. Co. 

AKRON, Ohio, U.S.A. 





(JFJC/M MEASURING TAPES 

* Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat, Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 



ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 



LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



London Office and Warehouse— 24 and 26 Holborn. 



New York City Branch— 880 Broadi 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Inc. UN. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^s>t^^H^t Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS ^ 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



Copy of cata- 
logue tont fr«e 

to any inter- 
Mtod fllo Titer 

upon applica- 
tion 




SHEET ZINC, 

SHEET COPPER, 
SPELTER, 

INGOT TIN, 

BRASS and COPPER 
TUBES. 



For lowest prices send your enquiries to 




LIMITED 

53 ST. SULPICE STREET, MONTREAL 



"Redstone" 

High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 



A packing that will hold. For use in highest 
pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests,- we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured Solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCH A & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

Of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yongo Street, Toronto. 

Branches i Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouvr. 



SHELBY 
SEAMLESS 
STEEL TUBES 



INVALUABLE IN 



General Machine Shop Work 
Bicycle Repairs 
Hydraulic Work 
Boiler Work 

We carry the largest stock of steel tubes in the 
Dominion. We can ship promptly almost any 
size or quantity called for. 

OANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS 

JOHN MILLEN & SON, LTD. 



321 St. James St. 
MONTREAL 



132 Bay Street 
TORONTO 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Great Britain, United States, West Indies, South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE-METAL 

A Weekly Newspaper Devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 
Office of Publication, 10 Front Street East, Toronto. 



VOL. XIX. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 26, 1907 



NO. 4. 




PEPPERCORN^DIAMONC 

gift, TRADE MARK ,C 



Canadian Agents: DORKEN BROS. & CO, MONTREAL 



"QUEEN'S HEAD" and 

"SOUTHERN CROSS" 

BLACK SHEETS 

Will stand any work. 

JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO. Ltd , MONTREAL 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal Managers, Canadian Branch. 



SHREWD DEALERS RECOMMEND THE "SOVEREIGN" 
BECAUSE IT PAYS THEM TO DO SO. 




That's one reason for the immense success of the 
" Sovereign " Hot Water Boiler. 

There are other reasons quite apparent to all practical 
men, and enumerated by many dealers as they describe the 
simplicity, economy and perfections of the "Sovereign." 

The "Sovereign" Hot Water Boiler has simplified 
the heating problem, and, as a consequence, the demand is 
increasing with startling rapidity. 



/V.B.— Are You Getting Your Share of the Profits ? 



TAYLOR - FORBES COMPANY, Limited 

Head Office and Works : CUELPH, ONT. 



TORONTO -1088 King St. West. 



MONTREAL 122 Craig St. West. 



See Classified List of Advertisements on Page 71. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



T. 



SPORTING GOODS 




G 
U 
N 

S 



AND 




BLUE ROCK TRAP 



R 

I 

F 
L 
E 
S 



TARGET Rl 




Write for Prices 





Shot 
Shells 

We have a full 
stock of shells 
loaded with 
Smokeless or 
Black Powder. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LI/1ITED 



TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Wouldn't you, Mr. 
Store-keeper, be 
worth more if you 
could do 100 per 
cent, more work ? 



That means that you 
can do ten hours work 
in five, because you 
can enter up your 
accounts and make up 
your customer's bill 
with one writing. You 
can do your york bet- 
ter, more quickly, and 
more accurately by 
the use of 




THE CRAIN CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 

than by the old out-of-date methods. Then, again, theCrain binders 
are more durable, and better made than any other, and do not have 
metal parts protruding to scratch your desks. They will hold one 
or a thousand sheets, as you wish. 

Drop us a card about any system you are interested In. 

The Rolla L Crain Co., Limited 



OTTAWA, CANADA 



TORONTO : 
18 Toronto Street 



MONTREAL: 
Alliance Bitig., 107 St. James St. 



WINNIPEG: 11 Nanton Block 



WE CARRY IN STOCK 

Horse-shoers' Clip Horn Anvils 

Prospectors' Anvils and Bellows 

Prospectors' Picks, Shovels and Stoves 

The Famous Blacksmith Blower No. 400 

The Grand Bay Blower No. I00 

Challenge Forges with Hood, Extra Strong 
Frame 

Hero Forges With and Without Hood 

Navy Wheelbarrows with Steel or Wood 
Trays 

Steel Pulley Blocks, Single, Double or 
Triple 

Write for prices. Prompt shipment. 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

Wholesale Hardware 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



LIMITIB 



Other Tools are very " 
Good Tools, but 

SCREW DRIVERS 



YANKEE TOOLS" 



aire: 



The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 
of the KIND. 




No. 30— SPIRAL RATCHET -right and left hand and rigid. 
No. 31— " " (heavy pattern) 

No. 20— " " right hand only. 



No. 41— AUTOMATIC DRILL. 



Chuck and 8 Drill Points 

for iplral ratchet 
■crew driver. 




c* 1-L-c- IBW/Vl H J.m »K L - : 



Countersink, 

for spiral ratchet 
■crew driver. 



SCREW DRIVER 7 E2ZZr. "o. 44— AUTOMATIC DRILL, with adjustable tension on spring. 





No SO— RECIPROCATING DRILL, for wood or metals. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, F»«. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Pi|\lr'c MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 



Rend for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Patent Open Socket Peaveys. 
Pink's Patent Open Socket Cant Dogs. 
Pink's Patent Clasp Cant Dogs, all Handled 
with Split Rock Maple. 

These aro light anil durable tools. 

Sold throughout the Dominion 
by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants 

MANUFACTURED BY 

WJSKr THOMAS PINK 
Pembroke, Ont, Canada. 



Established 1855 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

PIG IRON 



ENGLISH and 

Prompt and forward delivery. 



SCOTC H 

Interesting prices. 



Warehouse: 54-56-58 Front St. West and 1 Piper St. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Go 



TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Progressive Hardware Merchants 

Buy Disston's Files 

— Join that Rank and Order Now 





Our aim is to please you 
Your aim is to please your customer 
Therefore buy something good 

Buy DISSTON'S Files 



The name Disston's is a warrant 
that sells the goods 

Made of the Best Steel 




O of Disston's Files will outlive £t 
^ of any other kind— last as long 
and won't cost you any more. 



Sold by Hardware Dealers throughout the world. Get after us so that we may get after you. 
Write us for prices— We carry a heavy stock. No delay— Shipped same day order is received. 

LEWIS BROS., LIMITED 

Wholesale Hardware, MONTREAL 
And at— OTTAWA, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, CALGARY and VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



Consumers Cordage Co., 

Manufacture every variety of 

BINDER TWINE 



LIMITED 



CORDAQE 



PACKING 



LATHYARN 



SMALL TWINES 



From Manilla, Sisal, Italian, Russian, Jute 

Tallow Laid Transmission Rope, 3 or 4 Strand 

Oil Well Drilling Cables, Lariat Rope, 3 or 4 Strand, 

Halyards, Deep Sea Line, Snap Halters, Snap Plow Lines, 

Clothes Lines, Hide Cord, Pulp and Paper Cord, 

Tarred Rope, Marline, Houseline 

Wrapping, Rolling, Seaming, Sewing and Grape Twines 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment 

Mills: flONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 



BRANCHES: 



F. H. ANDREWS & SON, Quebec. CONSUMERS CORDAQE CO., Limited, St. John, N.B. MacQOWAN & CO., Vancouver 

TEES 4 PERSSE, Limited, Winnipeg, Calgary and Edmonton. QEO. WOOD, London, England. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg, Binder Twine Distributors for Northwest. 



Supplies for Sugar Makers 




Cuts 

Show 

Full 

Size 

Of 

Spouts 



MAPLE SYRUP CANS 



"EUREKA" "LOWER CANADA' 



Steel Sap Spouts 




Patented 1896 




All packed in cardboard boxes, 100 each 




"IMPERIAL" 



Steel 

Sap 

Spouts 



(Specially adapted for Covered Sap Buckets) 



ROUND and SQUARE - With 
Screw Tops. 

Plain or Lithographed. 
Capacity : 

l Qt. Wine Measure. 

1 Qt. Imperial Measure. 

'A Gall. Wine Measure. 

'A Gall. Impl. Measure. 

1 Gall. Wine Measure. 

1 Gall. Impl. Measure. 

Special design made up, if sufficient 
quantities are wanted. 




Sap 
Buckets 



Long Pattern 



Noa. 
Quarts 



12 
8 



Western Pattern 

6 and 10 Quarts 




Long pattern 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co. Ltd., 



MONTREAL and 
WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 




Pruning Saws 

One Cutting Edge. 



runing Saw/9 'arid Shears 




Tree {Prunern 

No. 1561. Steel Frame, Cast Steel Knife 12 in. long, detachable. 




Tree Pruners. Length, 6, 8, 10, 12ft. 





Pruning Satvs 

Two Cutting Edges. 




No. 60. 9 in. long, Light, Half Polished, Flat Spiral Spring. 




No. 85. 9'A in. long. Full Polished, Adjustable, Flat Spiral Spring. 



No. 0. 9 in. long, Japanned Handle, Brass Spiral Spring. 
" 12. 8K " " " Flat 





No. 40. 8jn. long, Black, Flat. Spiral Spring. 



No. 128. 9 in. long, Nickel Plated, Adjustable, Flat Spring. 



For other Pruners see our Hardware Catalogue 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



We 8hip promptly 



Opposite Union Station. 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 

Factory : Dufferin Street, Toronto, Ont. 

5 



Our Prices are Rlg^t 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you intend to sell files, why not sell the best ? 




The best goods will capture the best trade and 




keep it. JOWITT FILES are made in an 




English factory where theflwholejjprocess is con- 




trolled, from making the steel to the finished file, 




They wear longer and cut faster than other files. 



km 




We have sold them| for|"nearly 40 years. Sell 



JOWITT FILES. Packed in pasteboard boxes 

Hardware 
Montreal 



JUYVll 1 ril^CO. rw 

F.^W. 





FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, Limited, MONTREAL, CANADA. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




SAFETY HAMMERLESS REVOLVERS 
.22, .32, .38 Calibres 




Iver Johnson's grip can be furnished on 
these Revolvers at an extra charge. 



REVOLVERS 



No article should be select- 
ed with more care than a[Re- 
volver. 

For defence it must be sure 
and reliable. 

For safety it must be so 
constructed that it will not 
"Fire" at the wrong time. 

Dealers handling Iver 
Johnson Revolvers know that 
each of these weapons is 
absolutely safe. Accidental 
discharge is impossible. 

THIS IS WORTH 
CONSIDERING 

With these safety features 
the cost is no greater than 
for Revolvers without them. 



Wholesale Distributors 

MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE mND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 




No. 81 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish considered. 
Every saw warranted, Carved applewood handle. Patented, wave finish blade. 




SHU^Tio D ^THlcHJ 

■»■ RAZOR STEEL y 

,I0'0 FORONE CUT. 

»S0O OAYS\MP"K # 

SlOOO WEEKS. A 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and the No. Racer are tempered under 
our secret process. 





-;■••: - {fm&m*^™ 



No. O Narrow Racer Cross-Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



Manufactured 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



GALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Brantford— Roofings 

This Represent* Our 
^?T!^OTlIl^ ASPHALT" 




No. I, 2, 3 

"RUBBER" 
No. I, 2, 3 

Each Roll Is complete with Nails 
and Cement to lay. Best selling 
goods in the market. 

BRANTFORD ROOFING CO. 

LIMITED 
BIANrr'OM), OtfTAMO 



Ft 




Y5.WK - \&w\»& 



mWA^ vMKWMa CaUv^U) 



SIMPLE 




STYLE F. 



Trie 



LEADER 



n 

r- 



A Name Familiar to Boiler Makers in Connection with the 

Highest Grade Churns 



ITS STRONG POINTS: 

Stiff Steel Frame, with malleable iron fittings, Combination Bow 
Lev. r and Pedal Drive. Bicycle Ball Bearings. Bolted Trun- 
nions. Cream Breakers. Barrel easily drained and conveniently 
detatchable for cleaning. 
Dealers : When you handle this line you handle QUALITY. 

The Dowswell Manufacturing Co., Limited 



IV. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal 

EASTERN AGENTS 



HAMILTON 

ONTARIO 



8ALVANIZED FENCE HOOK PKe" """" W00D " P ' CKET °* "'" 



FENCE HOOK/ 

THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO.. Limited. 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 

-LONDON, ONT. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 



ARE THE BEST 

Highest Quality Grooming am 
Sheep -8 hearing Machine*. 

WE MAKE THEM 

8ZKD FOB CATALOG tH TO 
l»wUu ghMrav Mfc- Oft* »»*»M,m-^ 

Weibueoh & Hilger, limited special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





The Peterborough Lock Manufacturing Company, Limited 





Peterborough, Ont. 



Manufacturers of all kinds 



Rim and Mortise Locks, 
Inside, Front Door, and 
Store Door Sets, also full 
line High-class Builders' 
Hardware. 

Sold by all Leading Jobbers 
In the Dominion. 



Cylinder Night Latch, No. 103. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Serviceable 
Combination ™ TABLE 
Cabinet 



FOR 

HARDWARE 

TRADE 



A COMBINATION THAT 
EVERYBODY MUST HAVE 



Price Complete 

Lie 
SILVER PLATED $22.30 

LIST 

$14.00 



LIST 



BEST 

NICKEL SILVER 



CONTE NTS 

6 Table Knives 
6 Dessert Knives 
6 Table Forks 
3 Table Spoons 
6 Dessert Forks 
6 Dessert Spoons 
6 Tea Spoons 
2 Salt Spoons 
1 Mustard Spoon 

42 Pieces 

JOHN ROUND & SON, umjied 

MANUFACTURING 

Cutlers and Silversmiths 

Factories MONTREAL Established 

SHEFFIELD, Eng. 1847 




Size of Case 16 , -in. x H< ...-in. x 2% -in 




Dame Quality at 
Our Bidding Waits 



Our HCLndSCLWS are made of "top-notch" Crucible Cast Steel, they 
are tempered in oil and carefully tested. Every one is guaranteed. 

The illustration shows one of our Patent Ground, Hollow-Back, Highly-Tempered, 
Highly-Finished Handsaws. It is praised the world over. 

We also make Back Saws. Circular Saws, Hack Saws, Mill Saws, Canada Webs, 
Files, Edge Tools, etc. 

The sun never sets on Spear & Jackson's Wares 

A POSTCARD SENT TO US MAY MEAN A PILE 
OF BUSINESS SENT TO YOU. 

SPEAR & JACKSON s »gg&2teg 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



i 

y 
f 

I 



i 

? 

y 
y 

t 

y 
y 
y 
$ 



? 
? 

? 

? 

y 
t 

I 

y 
y 
y 

y 



X 

MANY OF THE BEST ARCHITECTS ARE SPECIFYING i 



Stanley's Bail-Bearing Hinges 



FOR ALL THEIR IMPORTANT WORK. 



DEALERS SHOULD HAVE THEM IN STOCK. 




CUT OF WASHER 

FULL SIZE 

IT IS SO CONSTRUCTED 

THAT IT WILL NOT 

COME APART 

IN USE 




I 



MADE IN 

WROUGHT 

BRONZE 

AND 

STEEL 



ARTISTIC BOOKLET ON APPLICATION 

THE STANLEY WORKS, New Britain, Conn. 



I 
I 

| 
| 

y 

i 



FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. •> 

♦> 




We want every hardware dealer handling this 
staple line to have one of our attractive 
Calendars, lithographed in 10 colors, which 
will be mailed free to all bona fide appli- 
cants. Write NOW. 

We also want all dealers In horse 
nails to watch this space weekly 
for some interesting information. 

™j Capewell Horse Nail Co. 



Dept. C 



TORONTO, ONT. 



u 



HARDWARE AND METAU 



THE 

SPECIALLY ROLLED STEEL 

used in making 

Hamilton Rifles 

gives the maximum strength with the minimum weight — 
the condition par excellence in rifle-making. 

HAMILTON RIFLES are made in three models — 
Nos. 15, 19, 23. 

No. 15 sells at $2.00 
No. 19 sells at $2.50 
No. 23 sells at $3.50 

ORDER FROM THE JOBBER 



THE HAMILTON RIFLE CO. 

Dept. 71 Plymouth, Mich. 



Are you interested in any of the lines that are advertised ? 
A Post Card will bring you price list and full information. 
Don't forget to mention Hardware and Metal. 



Working Iron ' 



n Common or 

Refined Bars 



London Bars are made in the following sizes : 

Flats, - - » 7, 16 inch to 4 inch x 3, 16 inch to \% inch 

Round Edge Tire, 1 inch to 3 inch Rounds, 3/16 inch to 2% inch 

Ov 



Squares, - % " to 2% " Ovals, ]/ 2 " tol.'j 
Half Ovals, - Yt " to 2^ " Half Rounds, % " to 2% 

London Rolling Mills _ 



54 



S 



London, Canada. 




WRIGHT'S 

NO. 10 TRACTION ENGINE 

HEAD tl^HT 




Best of its 
knul on the 
market, Brass 
Nickel Plated 
conical Burner, 

lli'.iv\ Copper 

Nickel Plated 
R eflector, 
throw s a strong 

brilliant stead] 
li^ht over a 
large area. 

Supplied with 
without. 

Brackets, as 

required. Full 
stock ol wicks 
chimneys, etc. 
always on hand 



Write us for illustrations and prices. 
MANUFACTURED Bf 



E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 



HAMILTON, CAN. 




Will Hold up a Shelf 

That'i what a shelf brackets for. 
For this purpose there can he 
Nothing Butter. Nothing 
Cheapbh than the BRADLEY STEEL 
BRACKFT. It is well Japanned, Strong and 
Light. The saviuii on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at which the goods 
are sold. Order direct or through your jobbers. 
TLA8 MFC. CO., 
*i«w Haven, Conn.. 



Expert Bookkeeping 

Investigation and auditing of all 
classes of accounts undertaken. 
Trading, profit and loss accounts 
and balance sheets prepared. Sets 
of books opened and office systems 
devised in an up-to-date manner. 
Collection of accounts a specialty. 

PERCY P. DAVENPORT 

622 Mclntyre Block, - WINNIPEC, MAN. 

Square your accounts 



INTERNATIONAL PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY, Limited 

OTTAWA, - - ONTARIO. 

Manufacturers ot strictly high-grade Portland Cement 
made by the most improved method of manufacture in 
existence. Each barrel contains three hundred and fifty 
pounds ot pure Portland Cement with no adulteration. 

The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO 

Manufacturer! of the celebrated 

'Saugeen Brand" 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT 

Prices on application. Prompt shipment 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO 

LTD. 

HEAD OFFICE WORKS BRANCH 

MONTREAL LACHINE TORONTO 



IRON and STEEL WIRE 

BARB WIRE PLAIN TWIST 

GALVANIZED WIRE 

GALVANIZED COILED SPRING FENCING 

STRANDED GUY WIRE 

BRASS WIRE 

PURE COPPER WIRE for Electrical Purposes 

WIRE NAILS 

WOOD SCREWS 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

STAPLES 

JACK CHAIN 

SPRING COTTERS 

STEEL WIRE BARREL HOOPS 




When ordering PLEASE speciify 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co's. Goods 

13 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




SPADES, SHOVELS, Etc. 

Entrust your trade to the house that 
can supply the "just right" Spades and 
8hovels 

By getting in touch with 
us you will become ac 
quainted with the favorite 



"Peterborough," "Lundy," "Irwin," and 'Hill" 

• Send in a postcard for our Catalogue and you will see where we stand. 

The Peterborough Shovel & Tool Company, Limited, Peterborough, Ont. 




MSTRON& 



STR( 



TOOL 
HOLDERS 



STRONG 



MARE ONE POUND 

OF TOOL STEEL EQUAL TO TEN 

POUNDS IN FORGED TOOLS 

SAVE ALL FORGING, 70% GRINDING 



CUTTING Off T001 



I 



%#f%| J CANNOT AFFORD TO BE WITHOUT THEM IF 



YOU DO LATHE AND FLANER WORK. 

SOLD IN CANADA BY: 

Williams & Wilson. Montreal Frothingham & Workman, Limited. Montreal 

Aikenhead Hardware, Limited, Toronto H. W. Petrie. Toronto 

A. K. Williams Machinery Co . Toronto, Winnipeg, Vancouver 

Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton Write for our latest catalog. 

ARMSTRONG BROS. TOOL CO. 



} 



"THE TOOL. HOLDER PEOPLE" 

106 N. FRANCISCO AVE., CHICAGO, U.S.A. 



STRAIGHT TOOL MOlOiH 



BORING TOQI 



A BOY'S POCKET MONEY 

Any boy can earn money in his spare time after 
school or on Saturday. 

We want a bright, intelligent boy, between 
9 and 16 years old, in every town and city and 
village in Canada. 

We will start him in business selling our 
useful publications. 

You will make a profit on each sale and 
earn a watch as well for good work. 

Simply send your name to us. 
Address 

The MacLean Pub. Co. 

10 Front St East, Toronto 



The Canadian Bronze Powder Works 

R. E. THORNE & CO. 

The only bronze powder works under the British flag. 
High Crade bronze powders and bronze liquids. 
Can fill all orders at short notice. 



MONTREAL 

WORKS AT VALLEYFIELD. 

14 



TORONTO 

NO ORDER TOO LARGE 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Let US 

Help You 
Increase 
YourBusiness 

Why not go after 

and get the fire brick • 
trade in your locality. 

Our expert informa- 
tion is at your com- 
mand and will enable 
you to make this a pay- 
ing line. 

Make this one of the 
New Year resolutions 
and KEEP IT. 



Francis Hyde & Co, 

Contractors 

and 

Foundry Supplies 

31 WELLINGTON ST. 
MONTREAL 



A MATTER OF DOLLARS 

Here you see the strongest, cheapest and 
best Ladder on the market. Bi^ talk, but we 
stand ready to make good every claim we make 
for our goods. 

There are no nails in this ladder. It is put 
together with screws and rivets and constructed of 
thoroughly seasoned ash. Durable, safe and a 
money saver. 

That Waggon Jack is a new 

article on the Canadian market 

and it already holds the United 

States market. It holds what 

it raises— because it has double 

acting dogs. 
It is built of steel and malleable iron, there is 
nothing to get out of order about this Jack. Built 
to lift all kinds of buggies, heavy waggons and 
general work. 

SEND FOR PARTICULARS NOW. 

SHIRREFF MANUFACTURING CO. 





BROCKVILLF, 
ONT. 



Don't Stop 




to ask your neighbor, lift 
the load yourself with 
The Burr Self-Locking 

Tackle Block Saves the labor of two or three 

men. 600 to 5,000 pounds capacity. 



Lewis Bros., Ltd., Montreal 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg 
Vokes Hardware Co., Toronto 
F. Hamilton & Co., Hamilton 
The Burr Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio 




Cap Screws, Set Screws, 
Machine Screws, Cold Pressed 
Nuts, Studs, Coupling Bolts, 
Special Milled Work, etc. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE and WORKS. TORONTO. ONT. 

District Off ioes : Montreal, Halifax. Ottawa, Winnipeg 
Vancouver. Rossland 




OUR LINES ARE SELLERS ! 

Why Not Write for Particulars? 

CABLE ADDRESS " SUPERIOR " FARLEY WORKS, SHEFFIELD, ENG 

CEORGE PHILLIPS & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Silverware, Electroplate and Cutlery 

We also make the best Razor on the market. Four exclusive brands with advertised names that will help 
every dealer. It costs a two cent stamp to find out about these solid old country lines which you cannot 
duplicate elsewhere. ALL MONEYMAKERS. 

OFFICE FOR CANADA, PACKARD BUILDING, MONTREAL telephone m .57 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Money for You, 

Lots of it 



Yea. there are 




more dollars in retailing Window Glass than some dealers think — and 
most dealers know it. 

You certainly are not giving yourself a square 
deal — if you have not seen our prices for spring 
deliveries. Besides, you do save money by importing 
direct. 

These strong cases assure delivery in good order, 
while our facilities assure promptitude. 

We are always glad to quote prices. 

Have you our catalogue ? 



The Hobbs Manufacturing Co., Limited 



LONDON 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 




The John Morrow Screw, Limited 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 

INGERSOLL, ONTARIO 



CELEBRA tD 



HEINISCH*»» 



Tailors' Siiears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, eto. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 




NEW YORK OFFICE. '•• Chinbin St 
NEWARK. N.J.. U.S.A. 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY UNQUESTIONED." 

Each pair of our »hear3 bears th- above trade mark. 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



Uomplft* Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS' 
und TAILORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Cc/npany 

WIEBUSOH A HILOIR, Limited, NEVA/ YORK Sole Agents 

15 





TRADE MAKE 

Latest Cata 
logue will be 

sent in 
exchange for 
your business 

card 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and Wagon Jacks 

Harness Snap*, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

SOLD BY ALL LEADING JOBBERS. 



STREET PAVING and SIDBWALKS ■ SPECIALTY 

SILICA BARYTIU ST ONE M. 

OF ONTARIO, Limited. 

Head Office 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills.General Manager 
Ask for quotations for 



Wator Proof Floors foi 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel- 
lar, Stable Floors, etc- 



Septic Tanks. 




"The Tool Holder People" 

ARMSTRONG 
BROS. TOOL CO. 

Manufacturers of Armstrong Patent Lathe and Planer 
Tools and other machine shop specialties. 

106 N. Francisco Ave., CHICAGO, ILL. 



GALVA«ng 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen this adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



HARDWARE AND METAt 



DREADNOUGHT 



A HIGH-GRADE ENAMELLED WARE 




Write for Catalogue 



Ontario Steel Ware, Limited 

115-121 Brock Ave. and "73-31 Florence Si:. 



TORONTO, ONT 



A. RUDD & CO., St. Helens, Lancashire, England 



Manufacturers of highest grade 





til A7ITDC' niAllnlinC ina " P atterns - Also Circle Boards. Beam Composes, Cauge 
OLHilLna UIHHIUI1UO Class Cutters, Boxwocd Squares and Laths, Plate Class Nippers, 

=^ Atmospheric Soldering Irons, etc., etc., etc., 

Canadian Agent : J. B. GI6SONE, P.O. Box No. <*78. MONTREAL 



NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities d - irable In a 
Closer They work silently an effec u dly, and 
never get out <»f order. In use in many of tho 
public buildings throughout Great bntain and 
the Colonies. 

MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



"QUALITY UNSURPASSED.' 

BAR IRON 



. •www- vw-vwwwv%/v •» 



h '^/VWX'WW'VX'VX'W'W'W'V/' 



or F^romp-t Shipments -t 



ry : 



TORONTO AND BELLEVILLE ROLLING MILIS, LIMITED 



ELLEVILLI 



ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Talking Points That Tell 
H. & /?. REVOLVERS 



Excellence of Construction 
Accuracy 
Rapidity of Action 
Absolute Safety 




Greatest Revolver 

Value for the 

Money. 



N.» matter which model or at what price it may be sold, every H. & R. Revolver under- 
goes the most rigid inspection both as to material and workmanship. Every part is accurate 
to the thousandth part of an inch and absolutely without a flaw. 

H. & R, POLICE PREMIER REVOLVERS 

combine more good features than any revolvers of other make selling for twice the money. 
The safety hammer enables them to be discharged quicker than any other hammer revolver. 
Automatic Ejector, Independent Cylinder Stop (found only on other make revolvers of 
much higher price), Light Weight, Beautiful in Design and Finish are the points that 
make them sell rapidly. 

Our Catalog tells about our full line and gives valuable selling points. 

HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. W0R „ c . E s s s TER - 



314 Park Ave. 




HAND HAMMERED 

CAREFULLY 

TEMPERED AND 

TESTED 

Dc/NMSAXeWorks. 

0u NOas,Canada.. i 



ILL STEEL AXE 



There are those who not only want a 
good Axe, but a good looker, one 
that they can take a pride id, and take 
care of. There is nothing in the variety 
of painted axes that looks quite as well 
as the All Steel Full Polished Axe. Our 
All Steel Axe is as good as it looks and 
is an easy seller. 



The Dundas Axe Works 



DUNDAS, ONT. 



To ba continued, 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



POPULAR OPINION 

may be ignored by the 
politician ; bu t the 
business man who 
ignores popular 
opinion woos com- 
mercial disaster. 

TK. 

Empire 

Queen 

Range 

is strongly endorsed 
by thousands of en- 
thusiastic users all 
over the Dominion. Its splendid appearance rivets atten- 
tion, while the many devices making for stove perfection 
have made it a general favorite with all dealers who are 
careful to please the trade. Let us mail you particulars. 




The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 



OWEN SOUND, Ontario. 



Limited, 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limited, 238 King St., Winnipeg:, Man., 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., 126 West Craig- St., 
Montreal, Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



THIS IS IT 



* 




4 



The Joy Malleable Range— Perfection of Construction- 
Elegance of Plain Ornamentation — The Highest 
Standard of Durability at Reasonable Cost 

A money-maker for you for 1907 

IAV L1FA tf*ft 32 tlumberside Ave., 
«IVI 'II U. 1_W., IOROSIO, ONT. 

TEES& PER88E CO., - Western Distributors, Winnipeg 

CHAS. H. FOX, - Agent for British Coumbla, Vancouver. 



"Samson" Milk Cans, Trimmings, Etc. 




"SAMSON" 



Now is the time when you should get your 
stock of these goods into shape for spring 
business. 

If you handle the "Samson" line you know 
you have something better than your competitor. 

You know when you recommend ''Samson" 
Milk Cans and Trimmings to your customers 
that the goods will bear out your recommend- 
ations. 

We can ship the finished articles or the 
trimmings promptly. 




•SAMSON" 



THE McCLARY MFG. CO. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, 
ST. JOHN, N.B., HAMILTON, CALGARY. 

'EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP" 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAl 



The Tank that Saves 



The loss ol From 1 5 
to 50 . which experts 
say is customary when 
oil is stored in faulty- 
barrels and cans, is en- 
tirely stopped by the 
Bowser. 

A Bowser Oil Storage 
Outfit prevents evapor- 
ation, leakage, waste, 
spilling and dripping and 
provides a safe, clean, 
economical, convenient 
and altogether satisfac- 
tory method of storing 
oil. 

If you want a clean 
siore, a safe store, and 
bigger profits on your oil 
business, write for cata- 
log V. It tells how. 




Cut 



S. F. BOWSER & CO., Inc. 



66-68 Fraser Ave. 



Toronto, Ont. 




Peerless Woven Wire Fence 



Here is a fence that will sell. Once up no need for repairs. 
It lasts for years — just what you are looking for. It's horse- 
high, pig-tight and bull-strong. No stock can [get over, 
under or through it. The most unruly animal can't butt it 
down and there are no barbs to tear and injure stock. It's 

WIND AND WEATHER PROOF 

The Peerless lock holds it perfectly rigid and the wires can't 
slipup, down, nor sidewise. Cold weather won't snap it 
and hot weather won't make it sag. It's the greatest thing 
out for farmers, stockmen and all other fence users which 
makes it a red hot proposition for dealers. It comes in rolls 
all ready to put up. It's easy to handle. Write for prices. 

The Banwell Hoxie Wire Fence Company, Ltd. 

Dept. J, Hamilton, Ont. 



Jowitt's 
Cast 



Steel 



All Standard Sizes 
in Steel. 

SPECIAL PlttCES FOE IMPORT. 

H. G. EADIE, 

22 St. John St. Montreal 



ESTABLISHED 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

WOLVERHAMPTON, Limited 

WOLVERHAMPTON 



Soil Pipe, 
Canada Plates, Tin Plates, 
Galvanized Sheets, Black Sheets, 
Sheet Zinc. 



JAMES BARBER, Era Works, Sheffield 

Best quality only 
TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY, 

RAZORS, CARVERS, Etc. 



J. H. ROPER 

Canadian Representative 
82 St. Francois Xavier Street - MONTREAL 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Common Sense and Dollars 



The man who is blessed with the former usually 
corners a fair supply of the latter. 

We claim that we manufacture CANT HOOKS 
AND AXE AND HAMMER HANDLES just a 
little bit better than our best competitors on this 
continent. 

We can make it worth your while to deal with 
us, because we own hujjfe timber reserves in the 
Southern States, import the raw material and manu- 
facture the goods ourselves. Does this mean any- 
thing to you ? 

Our three best lines are branded as follows : 



Empire 
Imperial 
"Champion" 



Write for particulars. 



J. H. Still Manufacturing Company, 

ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 



Limited 



Business Getters for Tinsmiths 

Are there any defective chimneys 
in your locality ' 

I ben it is your chance to t;<-t business. 

THE 

ZEPHYR Ventilator 




saves the expense of building a high 
chimney. 

It it so constructed as to guarantee a 
perfect draft and, therefore, easy com- 
bustion. 

By using the ZEPHYR it is possible to 
burn soft coal with the best results. 

The smoke is easily drawn off, enabling 
an even heal to be generated. 

THE ZEPHYR IS STRONGLY PDT UP AND WILL 
RESIST ANY STORM 

This is what others think of it : 



Montreal, June, 1901. 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Co., Ltd. 
Dear Sirs, 
We have been using two (2) of your " Aeolian " Ventilators 
for the past three years and would say lhat they have given en- 
tire satisfaction and are certainly all that you claim for them. 

Yours respectfully, Warden Kim, & Son. 



We manufacture and guarantee 

The Harris Filter The Zephyr Ventilator 

The Aeolian Ventilator Expansion Conductor Pipe 

The J. W. HARRIS COMPANY, Limited 

Successors to LESSARD & HARRIS 
Contractors Montreal 



Win 




Sausages made with the ENTERPRISE SAUSAGE STUFFER have no air inside the casing. For this reason they 
keep better. The corrugated spout allows the air to escape as the casing is stuffed. Buyers appreciate this, and other 
good points — like the acurate boring of the cylinder— in the 

ENTERPRISE 
SAUSAGE STUFFER, LARD and FRUIT PRESS 

NOW is the time to push these good for the 
fall trade. 

Ask for electros for advertising and advertising 
printed matter. 




The Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Pa. 

Philadelphia, U.S.A. 

New York Branch, 10 Warren Street 

San Francisco Branch, 438 Market Street 




^ ^:\>2y 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ftiiur, Cofneille & Co, 

MONTREAL 

Glue and Gelatine 

An •xt«nalv« ■ ••ortmant, to suit all rtqulrtmenti. 
WILL BE PLEASEO TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS * CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TUENEK * SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention HARDWARE ANT) MlTAL when writine. 



ALABASTINE 


A familiar household word. 
A necessity in every home. 


"Homes Healthful and 
Beautiful." "Health and 
beauty go hand in hand. 


The best advertised, the 
most saleable Wall Coat- 
ing. 


Notaint, no smell, no viti- 
ated a i r in rooms with 
Alabastined walls and 
ceilings. 


Has no competitor. There 
is no other "just-as-good." 


Ever more and more in 
popular favor and demand. 


Winsgolden opinions from 
Painters and Decorators. 


Ready for use with Cold 
Water. Simple and easy 
of application. 


Order NOW, so as to be 
ready for the Spring rush. 


Direct or through your 
jobber. 


THE ALABASTINE CO., 

Limited 
PARIS, ONT. 



A CARLOAD Or STEEL 

Just think of it 




A full carload of steel just arrived, to be 

manufactured into the celebrated 

"Best" Mops. 



Demonstrating the enormous sale on this favorite article 



Order early to ensure 
prompt shipment 



Made by- 



The Gumming Mfg. Co., Ltd 



Ask your 
Jobber 
for them 



R©n-Fro\A/, Or»"t. 

WINNIPEG : 608 Athdown Bldg. 



22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SPECIAL SKA TES 

FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 



Have you ever thought 
of the value of being able 
to meet every taste, or 
whim, or fancy, or need 
of your customers ? Of 
course, it's a pretty hard 
thing to do, but you can 
at least doit in SKATES 
if you have our complete 
line in stock. COM- 
PLETENESS AND 
QUALITY are the in- 
vincible combination that 
have made our line so 
successful. 

We draw your atten- 
tion to a few illustrations 
of special skates which 
we make. 

Figure skating is com- 
ing in again, which is 
evidenced by the demand 
we have for figure skates 
this year, and you will 
find the STARR 
FIGURE SKATE the 
most satisfactory you can 
put on your counters. 




THE "STARR TUBE 




THE "ACADIA" 




THE "LADIES' AND GENTS' BEAVER 




THE "LADIES' AND GENTS' BEAVER' 
With Flanged Runner 




THE "STARR FIGURE' 




THE "STARR TUBE RACER 



HIGHEST AWARDS WHEREVER EXHIBITED 
AT INTERNATIONAL AND OTHER EXHIBITIONS 

GOLD MEDAL at the 

DOMINION EXHIBITION 1S06 



THE 



STARR MFG. C° 



LIMITED 



Head Office and Works, DARTMOUTH, N.S. 
Branch Office, 126 Wellington St. W., TORONTO 



Not only are our skates 
of various forts. — self- 
fastening, hockey, fancy- 
skating, rink - skating, 
racing, etc. — popular 
with skaters, but our 
hockey sticks are popular 
with hockey players, and 
enjoy the very highest 
reputation. What more 
could the dealer want 
behind him than such a 
reputation ? 

Our representative is 
now on the road soliciting 
orders for 1907-08, and 
will call on you shortly ; 
but in case you would 
rather not wait for him, 
drop us a line; we are 
always pleased to answer 
letters. 



The 
"Rex" 
Hockey 
Stick. 






/ 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



No Trade Like the Hardware 

TO RECOGNIZE A GOOD THING QUICKLY 
AND HERE'S THE GOOD THING 





Canada's Famous 
"AUTOMOBILE" AND "CYCLE" SKATES 

New 1907 Designs Just Out 



YOU'LL WANT THEM 



WAIT FOR TRAVELLER 



Canada Cycle £> Motor Co., Limited 



TORONTO JUNCTION 



Everything For Sugar Making 



This is the season of the year to get 
your stock in shape for Spring 
business. 



SAP PAILS SAP SPOUTS 

Straight, Flaring. Eureka, Maple Leaf, E.T. 

Write for Prices. 

Letter Orders Shipped Promptly. 




KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, ONT. 

THE KEMP MFG. CO. OF MONTREAL THE KEMP MFG. AND METAL CO., Limited 

58 McGill St., Montreal, Que. McDermot Ave. E., Winnipeg, Man. 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




February is a short month, but for 
the live hardwareman there is ;i lot to 
do. II stocktaking has qo1 been done 
in January, It should be tackled at 

once as it is not only a big job in itself 
but it suggests many other important 
things to be done. An Inventory sale 
should be advertised, short lines should 
be stocked up, departments which have 
not paid their share of the profits and 
expenses should be reorganized or done 
away with and the results of the in- 
. < ni orv should be carefullj si udied Eoi 
ins showing how bet lei: results can 
be procured during the coming year. 

* * * 

Stocktaking is probably the most 
disliked job of the year. It is a mean 
job, but it is necessary and if it is 
gone after in the proper spirit the re- 
sults can be made of far greater value 
than if it is tackled gingerly with kid 
gloves. Go at stocktaking as though it 
was determined to get something out of 
it. Keep an accurate memorandum of 
every article in stock and clean up 
everything that is dirty or shopworn. 

* • * 

An Eastern Ontario dealer recently 
bought a $4,000 stock of hardware and 
put ten tons of the stock in the scrap- 
iron pile. He didn't pay for the scrap 
— the man who had to stand the loss 
was the fellow who had evidently 
scamped his stocktaking. He had 
probably gone on year after year mak- 
ing an inventory of goods and fooling 
himself into the belief that he had sev- 
eral thousand dollars worth of saleable 
stock. Instead of having an annual in- 
ventory sale he kept hoarding up the 
old unsaleable goods, allowing them to 
become more unsaleable all the time. 
He evidently didn't figure that the 
space in his store, on his shelves and 
in his warehouse was given to goods 
which ought to be gotten rid of for 
anything above the scrap-iron price 
over the counter or for the old material 
figure out of the back door. He didn't 
count up the lost time in repeated hand- 
ling of the stuff during the year and at 
stocktaking. But finally he learned his 
lesson-— or if he didn't he ought to. He 
sold to a dealer with modern methods, 
a man who will have nothing but sale- 
aide goods taking up shelf room or floor 

space. 

* * * 

Another concern we have heard of 
went on paying splendid dividends for 
a number of years. It made a big 
name for itself, but one day there came 
a bump and when creditors put in an 
appearance it was Eound that the divi- 
dends had been paid on the strength of 
a wind-filled inventory. The concern 
thought they were sound and borrowed 
■ in their credit. The day came when the 
balloon burst, creditors flocked in and 
the house of cards crumbled to pieces. 

* * * 

Many a merchant who thought bim- 

seU worth ten or twenty thousand dol- 
lar- has found that instead of having it 



in casb or its equivalent it was in old 
and worthless tod Make sure that in 
the inventory taken this year that the 
figures totaled up repre ent real dollars 
and not wind. 

When a man taki tocktaking his 

aim should be to find out what he is 
worth and how much has been made dur- 
ing the past year. In too many cases 
he is anxious to make himself believe he 
is worth more than be really is. lie 

wants a favorable result and the tenden- 
cy is for him to make the stock sheet 
tell too favorable a story. 1 >u t some 
day this man will have to close out his 
stock and try and make his imaginary 
personal worth measure up with the 
real selling figures. If a merchant wants 
to know what stock he has he should 
know it exactly, figuring a fair percent- 
age for depreciation. A wind-filled in- 
ventory won't fool the credit man in a 
wholesafe house. The only person it is 
apt to fool is the dealer himself. 

If a system of stocktaking cannot be 
adopted showing at the end of each 
day the real condition of the business, 
try, by all means, to have an accurate 
inventory showing the actual situation 
at least once in each year. 

* * * , 

After stocktaking has been completed 
and everything has been cleaned up an 
"inventory sale" will fie in order to 
clean out any goods which are deterior- 
ating in value. Many dealers have such 
a sale before stocktaking in order to 
bring down stocks to as low a point as 
possible. Both seasons are opportune 
times to push off such goods which the 
merchant has not found profitable and 
which can be replaced by better selling 
lines. It will he far better to stand a 
small loss now than a larger one later 
on. particularly as it brings cash into 
the till during the dull season. 

* * * 

There is no better season of the year 
to plan a new arrangement of the store 
than at stocktaking time. Stocks are 
at their low 7 est point. Holiday and 
winter goods are largely out of the way 
and spring shipments have not yet ar- 
rived. More time can be given now to a 
"spring housecleaning" or to installing 
a new silent salesman, cabinet of shelf 
boxes, etc., than later on, so the dealer 
who aims to make his store move with 
the times will get busy at once on se- 
curing quotations from the manufactur- 
ers of sehlf boxes, silent salesmen and 
similar fixtures. 

Much depends upon the arrangement 
of the stock, and any dealer who has 
found during stocktaking that the 
under the counters, or the top shelving 
or in out of the way corners in the 
warehouse has become a catch-all for 
odd articles, should devise some means 
whereby a better system can be follow- 
ed in future. The more modern fix- 
tures there are installed, the les>. oppoi 
t unity there is for slovenly clerks to 
dispose of odd things. There should be 
a place for everything and everything 

25 



should be kept in its place. But to 
keep things in their places a m 

stock card system should fie used in 
connect ion with model a si oi e fixl ures. 

* « * 

While stocktaking time is not usually 
a season when extensive buying is done 
it behooves every dealer to keep a keen 
eye upon the market reports, pari 
larly this year, when near! line 

either advanced sharply or is likely 
to move up higher-. By buying early the 
dealer not only has tin- advantagi 
making certain the delivery of goods 
which are likely to be but he, 

gets the advantage of present, pi 
often with a protection against a de- 
cline. From no quarter does there, ap- 
pear to be any indications, however, of 
lower prices during 1907 on the most 
used metals and materials which govern 
the great bulk of articles sold in the 
hardware store. 

* * * 

Take stoves, for instance. The cold 
winter has run stocks in the hands of 
manufacturers and retailers down to 
the lowest point in years. Pig iron 
holds firm at sky-high prices with 
stocks hard to procure in foreign 
markets, all Canadian furnaces being 
booked up for about a year ahead. 
Stove founders have already adva 
stove prices once and furnaces and reg- 
isters twice. Some have had to close 
down on account of the shortage of 
iron. A further advance seems certain. 
Under the circumstances it would ap- 
pear that the dealer who books orders 
early stands a better chance of making 
money than the one who holds off in 
the possible hope that prices of iron 
may drop or that stove manufacturers 
will continue to disagree on the ques- 
tion of an advance. 

* * * 

Paints and white lead arc other- lines 
which should be booked early. Paint 

materials have gone up in price and the 
stiffness in the lead market and growing 
shortage of white lead on both home 
and foreign markets would point to 
further advances in the spring. 
since the Government put the duty on 
white lead the tendency has been up- 
ward and the turning point appears to 
be a long distance off yet. 
• • • 

And in staple hardware lines the con 
ditions are about the same. Jobbers 
find their chief' difficulty to lie the mat- 
ter of securing goods to fill orders. 
Manufacturers are loaded up with busi- 
ness and with the increase in popula- 
tion the demand is steadily increasing 
Prices, too. are on the advance, al- 
though most lines have already been 
marked up. It can be safely said of all 
shelf and heavy snoods, as well ;* 
metals, that the dealer who books his 
orders earliest this year i> the one who 
stands the best chance of showing a 
margin on the right side of the li 
when another stocktaking season comes 
around. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Retailers Stirred to Action 

Thousands of letters of protest being sent to the Postmaster General and Members of Parliament Strong Arguments 
against proposed Parcels Post legislation Extracts from copies of a few of the letters written by Retailers. 



It is doubtful if anything has ever 
stirred the retailers of Canada so deep- 
:\ as the announcement made in Par- 
liament on Dec. 7th last, by Postmaster- 
General Lemieux, thai he was preparing 
legislation to amend the Parcels Po i 
Law. the proposal including provision 
for a C. O. d. system, whereby goods 
could be sent to any point and collec- 
tion made by the post office. It can 
easily be realized how this would work 
in favor of the retail catalogue houses. 
by obviating the necessity of sending 
the purchase price with every small 
onler. 

The announcement came just when 
Christmas activity was at its greatest. 
and consequently few retailers noticed 
,the incident, particularly as the large 
daily newspapers which carry pages of 
mail order advertising took care not to 
emphasize or draw attention t<> the an- 
nouncement, which was of particular 
interest to their thousands of retail 
•aders. 

Trade Papers Take Action. 

The MacLeau trade newspapers, how- 
ever, were alive to the interests <>f the 
retailers and promptly investigated the 
report and suggested a method by which 
the trade could effectively oppose the 
measure. We urged that each one com- 
municate at once with the local member 
of Parliament denouncing the proposal. 
and stating that he would be expected 
to cast his vote against it. 

We also urged dealers to write the 
Postmaster-General direct, giving rea- 
sons why the legislation should not he 
passed and further suggested that the 
editors of the country newspapers be 
asked to support the position taken by 
their local advertisers whose business 
is endangered. The Ontario and West- 
ern Canada Retail Hardware Associa- 
tions hacked this up by circularizing 
every dealer in the four provinces which 
their organization covers, hardware 
dealers being urged to take prompt and 
united action in bringing their influ- 
ence to bear on the Postmaster-Oen- 
eral in opposition to his proposed 
amendments to the Parcels Post Law. 

in every part of the Dominion the 
retail trade has responded promptly, 
and thousands of letters of protest 
have been forwarded to Ottawa. Tn 
many cases petitions containing the 
i of every retailer in a town have 
been sent to the members of Parlia- 
ment to be forwarded to the Post 
er-General. This is as it should 

The retail trade should not lie 
down and bp trampled upon -without 
•est. 



In one tow n close to Ton nlo the re 
tail trade has suffered severely from 
mail order competition and yet have 
failed to take action, taking the pes- 
simistic view that their efforts would 
lie futile. That Ibis ; s an exception, 
however, is (dear fiom the large num- 
ber of dealers who have sent to 
us copies of the letters they have for- 
warded to Ottawa. As will be seen 
from the following' extracts from a few 
of them neatly every section of the Do- 
minion is represesnted in the corre- 
spondence : 

Extracts from Merchants' Letter?. 

"Now 1 am dec ; dedlv opposed to any 
such legislation. We have express com- 
panies who forward narcels with promp- 
titude and at reasonable rates. Such 
a bill would build up catalogue houses 
and tear awav manv local businesses. 
Tf this Dominion is to prosper it must 
lie bv making trade conditions of such 
a nature as to give the <neatest good 
to the greatest number. This bill 
would handicap such conditions." — On- 
tario. 



"We believe such legislation would 
tend to favor a few monopolists, to the 
iniurv of a multitnde of local mer- 
chants who. as a rde. rank amongst 
our best cHi/eiis and nay beavv tax p s 
For tn» benefit of th- localities in. which 
thev do bxisiness. Cnmnefition : s suf- 
ficiently keen anions local merchants to 
protect the cons"in<T from nver-char<re. 
The narties solicitinir this lo"- : sl">finn 
aim a-t securin ' a srond portion of the 
mercantile business i n sections of the 
conntrv where thev oav no taxes."— 
Ontario. This W«S signed <•>- a number 
of merchants and a Gentleman signing 
himself an ex-M.P. 

Wn« Hurt Trade in Prit<>ir>. 

"We lpnrn that •.. Kill will bo intro- 
duced into Parliament at the nresent 
session tn establish a ehean nnrcel post 
c vstem in Canada, and wh" r ebv the 
nost office will collect on all narcels, 
that is. provide a e.o.d. service This 
means the introduction of the 'British 
parcel nost system, a svstem that- has 
ruined the business of the local dealer 
outside of the laree centres in that 
conntrv. The merchants n* Canada W'Tl 
oppose this measure in the most em- 
nhatie manner, and we ->sV -on to use 
con,'" infinence in have this Kin defeated. 
as it will seriouslv inft>r«, if not de- 
stroy, in mm" r>Jaces the enternrises 
thqt do ro st towards nromot'ne a 
vie-orons and nrosnerous e-rovvth in local 
towns and villages." — Ontario. This 
communication was signed V»v all the 
leading merchants of the town. 
* * 

"The passage of such a bill would put 
a great many local retailers out of 

26 



business, ami put a large amount, of 
extra work and expense on the post- 
masters. I hope you will oppose the 
measure" -Ontario. This merchant is 
also a postmaster. 



"1 would ask you to earnest L oppose 
this measure, as, in my opinion, it 
would be a great detriment to at least 
three-fourths of the people engaged in 
mercantile business. As it tends 
towards the centralization of trade in 
one or two cities, it would injuriously 
affect hundreds of other cities, towns 
and villages. It would also tend to the 
further burdening of the mails, on ac- 
count of which the public is already 
suffering. T cannot see that there would 
be any general benefit resulting from 
such a measure, and in the interests of 
a large proportion of the people of Can 
ada, and especially of this city and dis- 
trict, T would again ask you tn oppose 
it." — Ontario. 



"The growth and prosperity of this 
Western Canada surely depends upon 
the energy, prosperity and success of her 
local citizens." — Manitoba. 

Will Affect Farmers Adversely. 

" Ff this becomes law it will greatly 
facilitate the progress of Toronto and 
Montreal catalogue houses, which have 
already become a menace to the pros- 
perity of our town and county. A 
consideration of this growing evil shows 
that it is unfair to local merchants, and 
in the end will he disastrous to those 
who encourage it. Local support is 
necessary to ensure good, healthy busi- 
ness, and progressive merchants are. 
necessary to the growth and success of 
their towns. Without them there is 
no market, the largest taxpayers dis- 
appear, there is little or no demand for 
labor, and as a direct result, farmers' 
lands decrease in value, as an active 
market is necessarv for the profitable 
sale of their produce. Merchants in 
small towns, particularly in a farming 
community, are obliged to give their 
customers long credits, often tide them 
over a period of misfortune, and handle 
at a loss much inferior produce, con- 
sequently they are placed at a disad- 
vantage when brought into competition 
with catalogue concerns, wdiose business 
is conducted on a strictly pay-in-ad- 
vance basis, and who are not called 
upon to pay anything locally." — Nova 
Scotia. 



"I feel that we already have enough 
competition from this class of traders, 
who pay nothing in the way of local 
taxation, and I also feel that the gen- 
eral public would not benefit by the 
proposed change. People can buy as 
cheaply at home as from the catalogue 
houses, but they are innuenced by the 
advertising features of the latter." — 
Quebec. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"You are, of course, aware of the 
immense amount of monej sent out of 
the small towns every (lay to the cat a 
[ague houses for goods that command a 
good profit, Leaving the local dealer to 

supply the staples at a Very small 

pioiit, and pay the taxes/ Quebec 
Would Kill Local Trade. 

"Not onlv would such legislation be 
unfair to the merchants, but every busi 
ness would be adversely affected. The 
tendency would be to. kill local trade, 
lessen local competition and enterprise, 
and depreciate real estate values. In 
order to make our ideas as plain as 
possible we will view as an illustration 
this village, with a population of about 
800, six general, five grocery and two 
hardware stores, two harness shops, 
three merchant tailors, and a number 
of smaller businesses besides. I □ 
doubtedly it may be admitted that com- 
petition is keen enough here. We con- 
duct one of these general stores, carry 
a stock of from $12,000 to $16,000, em- 
ploy ten hands the year round, pay 
rent, taxes and insurance. We take an 
interest in the progress of the village 
and foster the growth of our market. 
The result is good prices and accommo- 
dation for the farmers from the sur- 
rounding country. They cannot do 
without the local market and stores ; 
it is impossible lor them to drive to 
Toronto with their butter, eggs, fowl, 
etc. It is clear that prosperous towns 
and villages tend to create prosperous 
farmers. One cannot well do without 
the other and this condition is a natur- 
al one that exists all over Canada. We 
purchase the product of the farm for 
which we pay prices established by local 
competition. During the past few weeks 
we paid out for fowl alone over $5,000. 
B\ the combination of retailing goods 
and handling farm produce we are able 
to conduct and sustain a fairly profit- 
able business, and at least four other 
stores here are conducted on similar 
lines. We have nothing to fear from 
fair competition, hut u -M be protect- 
ed from legislation giving the mam- 
moth mail order houses any unfair ad- 
vantages." — Ontario. 

Detrimental to Progress. 

"Such a bill, should it become law. 
would be a menace to our interests in 
proportion as it would benefit a class 
of merchants who reap where they do 
not sow, and who do business in com- 
munities to whose progress they do not 
contribute bv their presence, their ener- 
gy or their taxes. We would be sorry 
to oppose a measure that would con- 
tribute to the comforts and convenien- 
ces of the people as a whole, but in 
opposing the measure in question — 
which we will do most determinedly, 
and which we ask you to do as repre- 
senting us — we would point out that a 
policy which tends to the centralization 
of business, and the nurture of large 
concerns, cannot but be detrimental to 
that progress in country communities 
which we must all desire to see. "—Al- 
berta. 

* 
"We could fill pages giving our indi- 
vidual reasons for asking you to oppose 
such a bill, but have confidence in your 
ability to grasp the full effect that it 
would have without our going further 
into the matter." — Saskatchewan. This 
was signed by every business man in 
the town. 



"\\ c would ask you to keep tab bn 

this matter, and oppose it to the 

tent of >our abilit \ , a . il eriouslv men 

aces trade, in every place ea I ol Mon 
treal. especially in Pi ini e Edwai d 
Island. . . . Every dollar that 
out of the province impoverishes it 

Mist that much."- Prince Edward 

Island. 



"I respectfully call your attention to 
the stand which I take in the matter 
of the lull about to be introduced re 
extension of the pal eel post system. I 
believe this is merely a scheme of the 

departmental stores. If adopted it 
would be a source of injury to every 
rising town in the west. Our country- 
needs population, not monopoly— legis- 
lation that will fill the west with busi- 
ness centres instead of crushing out the 
small dealer." — Alberta. 

In the Interests of the Few. 

"This legislation would be in the in 
terests of the few. It would be unjust 
to the local retailer, who would, in ef- 
fect, have the Government in league 
against him. It would be another step 
toward centralization. and another 
favor given to large corporations. It 
is of great importance to the farmers 
that large and up-to-date stores be 
found at their very doors. The legisla- 
tion referred to would not help this, 
but operate against it." — Ontario. 



"This measure, I think, would be very 
unfair to town, village and country 
merchants. We are here on the ground 
where we have to pay our taxes, anil 
where we have an interest in the wel- 
fare of our particular locality. We have 
a right to be protected so tar as pos- 
sible from what would certainly be un- 
fair means employed by mail-order 
houses, who have no interest whatever 
in our community, except to get our 
trade from us. If you can see your way 
clear to oppose this measure T think 
you would be conferring a favor on not 
only the business men, but the whole 
community in general. "—Ontario. 



"Progressive communities the country- 
over are almost exclusively those who 
have the spirit of, and practice, home 
protection. Progressive towns always 
increase the land value of the adjacent 
territory. The large retail catalogue 
houses, by absorbing the trade of the 
smaller towns and villages, act as a 
detriment to their welfare, and also 
that of the country adjacent." -Saskat- 
chewan. 

Merchants Pay the Taxes. 

"For the Government to step in and 
assist mail order houses to distribute 
their goods, at a nominal charge, would 
be most unfair. . . . We pay taxes 
to keep up our roads, streets, bridges, 
etc., but if the mail order houses, with 
out assisting us in our municipal ex- 
penditures, are to be enabled to take 
our business away— the means provided 
by the Government— what benefit do we 
get from these taxes '"—Ontario. 



".Mail order houses do great injury to 
our town and country stores, and are 
no benefit to those who purchase ernnds 
from them. 1 have compared the goods 

27 



wnli what we sell, and sec no dif- 
ference." \o\a Scotia. 

Manifestly Unfair. 

"We do not fear any competitoi if he 
is placed on an equal tooting with oui 
selves, but it is so manifestly unfair 

that we should have to paj a bu 

tax. support our schools and OUT 

churches and be expected to respond to 
every local demand, and the 

houses come in without paying anv of 
these things, that we shall pect 

to oppose t In- measure « hen it . 
up."— Ontario. 



Bj passing such a bill the Govern 

ment would certainly, whether con 
seiouslj or not, be playing into the 
hands of the catalogue houses."— Que 
bee. 



"Quite a number of our people are 

thoughtlessly -ending a great di 
their money to the city stores, tl 
cutting their own throats, ruining then 
home town, decreasing value ol proper- 
ty, etc. They are building up Toronto 
and other cities at the expense, and to 
the stagnation, of their own community 
if people would spend their money at 
home it would come back to them in a 
better town, better schools, better 
churches, better stores, better social ad- 
vantages, and increased value of proper- 
ty. The city stores, on an average, 
(on t sell any cheaper than we do. They 
don t help pay taxes, etc. They are 
great and clever advertisers, and", you 
know, fields are green far away. ' Mail 
order competition is harmful enough in 
the smaller towns without giving them 
extra legislation."— Ontario. 

No Special Favors. 

The retail trade do not seek ally 
special favors from the Postal Depart- 
ment, and are quite right m protesting 
against special privileges being given 
the huge mail order houses. I be To- 
ronto Globe, in commenting editorially 
on the Postmaster-General's statement 
in Parliament, said: " In this promised 
reform there is nothing revolutionary 
ami the moral, sense of the people, as 
well as of the Government, gives' an 
assurance that no private interest will 
he treated unfairly." The real object 
of the bill, however, is the unfair treat - 
lll(, "l of private interests, and behind 
it are the T. Eaton Co. and other mail 
order concerns. The editorial comment 
referred to, whether intentionally or 
not, tends to disguise as a public bene- 
faction a measure which will benefit 
one section of merchants at the expense 
of another section. 

In order to guarantee that " no pri- 
vate interest will he Heated unfairly" 
the retail dealers must hi' up and do- 
ing. If there are any who have not 
vet written their M.P. and the P 

master-General they should do so at 
once. And in every town from Hali- 
fax to Vancouver a meeting of the 
merchants should he called to make cer- 
tain that the campaign will he contin- 
ued until the objectionable features of 
the proposed legislation have been with- 
drawn. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Doing Business on Cash Basis 

Sensible Article by £. Thurston in the National Hardware Bulletin How a Credit Business was 

transferred to a cash system. 



Perhaps I can interest you and 

u readers in a few words about 
f and my business, as m\ method 
of doing business is somewhat distinct- 
ive from the general run of hardware 
store policies in the fact that I con- 
duet a hardware store on a cash basis 
and keep so elo»e to cash in :very tran- 
■n, both in store and shop, that I 
feel that 1 can rightly claim the dis 
tinction that I do a cash business. His 
tory i- always dull unless it r-.>mcs 
home to the reader of it. I hope to get 
near home to some of my fellow hard- 
waremen, and not only interest lr.it be 
of some benefit to them in point oul a 
surer and pleasanter path to n irsue 

ago 1 bought oit a small 
tinshop that was being- run in connec- 
tion with a general hardware store and 
lumber yard, and as 1 was handy at 
all kinds of mechanical work and having 
a pretty thorough knowledge of the 
tinner's" trade I got along fairly well, 
managing to save up a few dollars \>\ 
close application to business and still 
r to collections for work done. 

Things went well along this line foi 
about two years when for lack of room 
in my then limited quarters, and what 
appeared to me then a splendid oppor- 
tunity to engage in the merchandise 
business, I bought out a small hard- 
ware stock and added it to my shop 
work, also leased the building for a 
term of years. 

Tinsmith Became Merchant. 

At that moment I became a merchant 
ad of a tradesman in the eyes of 
the public, and then and there I was 
expected to conform to the rules of the 
town and the customs of the other mer- 
chants of the town. While 1 worked at 
my trade my customers seemed to be- 
lieve I had need for the money earned 
and payments came readily, but as a 
merchant all I needed was to sell them 
goods on credit, so in my timidity in 
business decision and lest T should of- 
fend some of my customers, I decided 
to do a little credit business in a very 
conservative way. 

Well, things went about as you would 
suppose. Before the first year had 
closed 1 discovered that in spite of all 
my conservatism and as I thought 
shrewd business tact, my books showed 
more goods scattered out over the coun- 
>n unlimited time, than J had in the 
1 realized the situation fully, T 
saw that a change must lie made speed 
il'- otherwise there would be a case of 
•failure of health" and a "splendid 
busini portunity for sale," so I 

took counsel with more experienced 
and older business heads and through 
their friendly advice and due considera- 
tion of the situation myself, on January 
1st following. I issued in print in our 
town paper this proclamation to the 
public : 

A New Year's Resolution. 

After due consideration we have de- 
cided from this date forward to do a 



cash business in selling goods. We do 
not wish to humiliate anyone bj > 
ing them credit, neither do we wish to 
become embarrassed when our bills be- 
come due and we have nothing to pay 
with. Every favor and accommodation 
consistent with good business principles 
will be accorded our customers in buy- 
ing goods. We do not invite open ac- 
counts. By selling for cash we can and 
will sell cheaper, will have more friends, 
will lie able to promptly meet our obli- 
gations, t,, present, no duns and to do 
more business. Khopwork same terms 
as heretofore. 

(Signed.) E. Thurston. 

Such was the determined step that 
we took several years ago and such is 
our policy today, and proud we arc 



A Pertinent Question 



It has frequently been stated that in order 
to make it possible to do business on a cash 
basis it is necessary for alt the dealers in a 
town to agree to do away with the credit system 
at once. This week we publish the experience 
of a retail hardwareman who had the nerve to 
stand on his own shoe leather and who made a 
success of the cash system in spite of the 
opposition of dealers who continued to give 
credit. 

In the Western Provinces where the trans- 
portation problem makes it hard for farmers to 
get cash for their grain without selling at low 
prices it is said that the " Cash System " can- 
not be adopted. We know, however, of several 
dealers in the West who have successfully 
changed their store policy. Why should 
farmers hold their grain for months and make 
big money while at the same time borrowing 
money in the form of goods from the merchant, 
who in many cases does not even charge 
interest? Too many farmers leave money in 
the bank drawing interest while at the same 
time running long accounts at the hardware 
stores. If the merchant loses it is largely his 
own fault. 

The editor of Hardware and Metal wants to 
hear from'the hardware dealers in Canada who 
have been progressive enough to put their 
business on a cash basis. It is hoped that 
some helpful suggestions can be given if a list 
of " We Sell for Cash Only " hardwaremen is 
compiled. Travellers and merchants are, 
therefore, requested to forward the names of 
dealers who do not give credit. 



that we have departed from that annoy- 
ing and vexatious credit plan, and that 
we have placed our business on as near 
a strictly cash basis as it is possible to 
do so in a business with its varied 
make up such as we have done. 

Tn our shonwork we have never at- 
tempted to do a spot cash business as 
the very nature of it would not permit 
us to do so. It would be disastrous to 
any shot) that deoends on public patron- 
age, and unite a hardship on the patrons 
to demand of them a cash settlement 
the moment the work was done. This 
would be utterly impractical for often 
in ease of a breakdown repairs must be 
made at once, regardless of cost or 
terms. 

We have in connection with the store 
both a harness and tinshop. Now some 
may conclude this method of conducting 

28 



shopwork in connection with store 
would tend to depreciate the cash stat- 
us of tin- ^torc, but not so. It works 
the other way, the rigid policy of the 
store tends to draw the shop to its 
high level. 

A Man with a Principle. 

Perhaps you would like to know what 
we did about those customers who said 
they "would not spend their money 
where they could not get credit." Well 
we let them go their way, refusing to 
discuss our method with them in open 
conversation, but fighting our battle 
unceasingly through the town paper, 
and in most cases they came back and 
traded with us and really admired our 
pluck. The world admires a man for 
having a principle and sticking to it. 

With a great many our plan of doing 
business served as an advertiser as it 
singled us out as distinct from the other 
merchants of the town. We have lone: 
since found that no one man can sell all 
the goods of the town nor can he sell 
to everybody. It is our opinion, based 
largely on the last few years' experience 
and close observation, that the time is 
ripe for radical changes in methods of 
doing business. Credit is an old fogy 
and will prove disastrous sooner or 
later to the advocate of it. The cata- 
logue house gets the cash anywhere 
from a week to months before the 
goods appear. Surely we can demand it 
when the goods are delivered to our 
customers. The poor merchant has per- 
mitted himself to be made a pack horse 
until everyone feels that he is invited 
to ride because he goes easy. 

Telephone Calls. 

Now as to the price question on goods 
sold under the cash plan of doing busi- 
ness : Well, we have leaders, as we 
have always had, with very close prices, 
usually on staple articles, but the great 
bulk of hardware goods can be pushed 
on quality to a better advantage than 
on price. When we changed from credit 
to cash we made a slight change in 
price but, rather defended our position 
on the theory that the goods were the 
equivalent, of the money and that we 
were justly entitled to the money for 
our goods. 

We keep no customers' books — only a 
little memorandum book in which we 
note goods sent out in response to 
telephone orders or otherwise. These 
are usually settled in a day or two. If 
the goods are not settled for promptly 
and the party does not treat the tran 
saction as a favor shown him. his call 
is passed by next time. 

This we believe to be as near a 
practical cash business as it is possible 
to do under the existing surroundings. 
We live up to our motto in dealing with 
our customers. We pay them cash on 
the spot, rarely giving cheques, only 
for large sums, thus forging our way by 
example as well as precept. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Catalogue Houses. 

The effect of the catalogue house is 
si ill